Doctor and patient close-up of hands. Doctor holding a pen, hovering over a clipboard.

Clinical trials

Novel clinical research conducted by the Lambert Initiative’s clinical team and collaborators within Australia

Our clinical team, in collaboration with expert clinicians and researchers around Australia, are focused on developing clinical evidence for cannabinoid-based therapeutics and understanding Australian community use of medicinal cannabis in a range of disease areas.

Clinical Trials

Cannabidiol for Acute Psychosocial Stress, Situational Anxiety and Nausea (CAPSTAN): A Randomised Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a non-intoxicating constituent of the Cannabis sativa plant that is now widely used as both a prescription drug and a nutraceutical product. CBD exhibits a good overall safety and tolerability profile and has a low potential for abuse.

There has been recent evidence supporting the use of CBD to treat anxiety disorders and is generally demonstrated at relatively high oral doses of CBD. However, in North America and many European countries, a wide range of ‘low-dose’ CBD products are widely available in pharmacies and health food stores as “wellness” products

This study aims to determine the effects of 'low dose' cannabis-based medication on stress and nausea in healthy participants using Virtual Reality scenarios that are designed to elicit mild stress and nausea responses.

You may be eligible if you are:

  • a healthy adult
  • between 18-50 years old
  • proficient in English
  • living in Greater Sydney

Trial Coordinator: Zeeta Bawa (University of Sydney)

Chief Investigator: Professor Iain McGregor (University of Sydney).

You can register your interest via our online pre-screening survey.

Human Research Ethics Committee approval has been granted by The University of Sydney [2023/307].

Cannabidiol (CBD) as an adjunct to Maudsley Family Based Treatment (MFBT) in young persons (12-18 years) with Anorexia Nervosa (The CAFTAN study)

CBD has demonstrated promising reductions in treatment-resistant anxiety in young persons. CBD may reduce the anxiety provoking re-feeding phases of MFBT improving response to MFBT.

The ‘CAFTAN’ study is an open-label pilot. 800mg/day CBD will be administered every day for 3 months alongside MFBT. Participants will also have an option to enrol into an extension arm of the trial and continue taking CBD for an additional 3 months if deemed appropriate by research team and patients care team.

You may qualify if you:

  • Are aged 12-18
  • Have anorexia nervosa
  • Are in the care of a medical practitioner
  • Are willing to commence Maudsley Family Based Treatment
  • Are medically stable

This is a collaboration between the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics and the InsideOut Institute for Eating Disorders

Trial Coordinator: Sarah-Catherine Rodan (University of Sydney)

Chief Investigators: Associate Professor Sarah Maguire OAM (InsideOut Institute, University of Sydney), and Professor Iain McGregor (University of Sydney).

For more information and to register your interest, visit the CAFTAN website.

If you have any questions, please contact the Trial Coordinator (caftan.study@sydney.edu.au)

Human Research Ethics Committee approval has been granted by the Sydney Local Health District [X21-0440].

Can cannabidiol (CBD) increase exercise enjoyment and enhance exercise tolerance?

Findings from a recent pilot study conducted by the Lambert Initiative suggest that CBD may increase feelings of pleasure during exercise and alter physiological processes (e.g., oxygen consumption) in such a way that improves exercise tolerance.

While these results suggest that CBD may have potential as an exercise aid for patient populations, further investigation is required to better understand its effects.

This randomised, double- blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial will investigate the effect of CBD on exercise tolerance in twenty-five healthy individuals. Endurance-trained male and female runners will be recruited for this initial investigation.

Participants will complete three research sessions involving a controlled bout of running exercise on a treadmill (60 min), a short (30 min) recovery, and an incremental run to volitional exhaustion.

This is a collaboration between The Lambert Initiative  for Cannabinoid Therapuetics and Griffith University.

Chief Investigator: Professor Paul Haber (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital)

Project Coordinator: Ayshe Sahinovic (The University of Sydney)

If you are interested in participating in this study, please contact Ayshe Sahinovic (ayshe.sahinovic@sydney.edu.au)

Human Research Ethics Committee approval has been granted by the Sydney Local Health District [X21-0392].

Cannabidiol for chronic neuropathic pain caused by spinal cord injury 

This research project will investigate the chronic pain that commonly occurs after spinal cord injury.

Using advanced brain imaging and other assessments, the project aims to:

(a) examine if 6-week treatment with CBD can reduce neuropathic pain

(b) to better understand the specific changes occurring in the brain after SCI that lead to the development of chronic neuropathic pain.

This is a collaboration between the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics, the Brain and Mind Centre and the School of Medical Sciences at the University of Sydney.

Chief InvestigatorProfessor Luke Henderson (Brain and Mind Centre, School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney)

Research Team: Professor Iain McGregor (Lambert Initiative, University of Sydney), Dr Elizabeth Cairns (Lambert Initiative, University of Sydney), and Dr Sachin Shetty (Prince of Wales Hospital).

Trial Coordinator: Anastasia Suraev (Lambert Initiative, University of Sydney)

PhD students: Rebecca Robertson and Fernando Tinoco (Brain and Mind Centre, School of Medical Sciences, University of Sydney)

If you are interested in participating in this study, please call 0439 804 551 or email (scan_study@sydney.edu.au).

You can also register your interest via our online pre-screening survey: https://bit.ly/SCAN_study

Human Research Ethics Committee approval has been granted by the University of Sydney [2021/936]

We have a number of clinical trials that are yet to start recruiting. Check back soon for updates.

  • MINI trial: CBD vs. THC/CBD in pediatric palliative care (A/Prof Anthony Herbert, QUT and Children’s Health Queensland)
  • CANARY trial: Low-dose CBD wafer in situational anxiety (Zeeta Bawa, Brain and Mind Centre)
  • CANCLOZ trial: High-dose CBD in clozapine-resistant pyschosis (Prof Dan Siskind, Princess Alexandria Hospital, Brisbane)

Surveys

Cannabinoids for Adult and Paediatric Epilepsy Survey (CAPE)

Many people with epilepsy continue to face barriers in accessing medicinal cannabis, suggesting that further refinements to the Australian treatment framework may be beneficial. 

This survey will help us better understand the lived experience of individuals with epilepsy are currently using or have previously used, illicit and/or prescribed, medicinal cannabis to treat their epilepsy.

The results of this survey will provide us with invaluable information that we can use to better advocate for the needs of people with epilepsy when speaking to policymakers and health professionals about cannabinoid medicines.  

You can take part in this research study if you are:

  • at least 18 years of age,
  • reside in Australia,
  • an adult with epilepsy OR a parent/guardian of a person with epilepsy, and
  • have used medicinal cannabis, prescribed (legal) and/or non-prescribed (illegal), to treat the epilepsy.

Trial Coordinator: Dr Anastasia Suraev (Lambert Initiative, University of Sydney)

Research Team: Douglas Skene (Master of Brain and Mind Sciences, University of Sydney), Professor Iain McGregor (Lambert Initiative, University of Sydney)

For more information, and to get involved, please click here.

This project is a collaboration between the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics at the University of Sydney and Epilepsy Action Australia.  

Human Research Ethics Committee approval has been granted by the University of Sydney [2023/313].

Related articles