Dr Catherine Grueber
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Dr Catherine Grueber

BSc, MSc, PhD (Otago)
Robinson Fellow
School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Dr Catherine Grueber

Broadly, Catherine’s work reveals how evolutionary and population processes affect individual- and population-level genetic diversity of small populations. In doing so, she aims to develop new techniques for measuring and mitigating loss of diversity in conservation. Catherine’s technical strengths lie in molecular population genetics, understanding the evolutionary consequences of genetic diversity loss (such as impacts of captive breeding, inbreeding depression, genetic rescue, and evolution of immune-gene diversity), and modelling approaches to hypothesis testing in evolutionary genetics.

2016: Faculty of Veterinary Science, Award for research that has made a significant impact in the field.

2015: Alan Wilton prize, presented by the Genetics Society of AustralAsia to recognise outstanding contributions to the field of genetics research by an Australasian scientist early in their career (more info)

2015: Named as a "Top Reviewer" for Molecular Ecology (among the top 8% of reviewers, based on number, timeliness and quality of reviews) (2014) by The Molecular Ecologist (more info)

2015: Faculty of Veterinary Science (University of Sydney) Award for the publication with the most citations in the last 5 years, for work published in the Journal of Evolutionary Biology (view at publisher's website)

2014: Named as a "Top Reviewer" for Molecular Ecology (among the top 8% of reviewers, based on number, timeliness and quality of reviews) (2014) by The Molecular Ecologist (more info)

2010: PhD thesis was recognised by the Division of Sciences (University of Otago) as being of “exceptional quality”.

2010: DG Catcheside prize, presented by the Genetics Society of AustralAsia to the top doctoral scholar in genetics (more info)

Project titleResearch student
Conserving Australia's iconic marsupials; one genome at a time.Parice BRANDIES
Investigating the diets of two critically endangered Australian bird speciesAngie JARMAN
Assessing the success of the rewilding of small mammals into North HeadAngela RANA

Publications

Download citations: PDF; RTF; Endnote

Selected Grants

2018

  • Evolutionary genetics of managed animal populations, Grueber C, DVC Research/Robinson Fellowships (SIF)

2017

  • Molecular diet analysis of an introduced island population of Tasmanian devils, Belov K, Grueber C, Hogg C, McLennan E, Equity Trustees Limited/Holsworth Wildlife Research Endowment

In the media

Captive-bred Tasmanian devils susceptible to car strike Roadkill is the biggest threat to the survival of Tasmanian devils after facial tumours and now a study by an international collaboration of experts has found a correlation between death by car strikes and time in captivity.

May 2017

7LA Launceston interviewed Dr Catherine Grueber from the Faculty of Veterinary Science about the ‘Save our Tasmanian Devils’ crowdfunding campaign

"America and Australia in partnership to save the Tassie devil" Sydney University News

Feb 2014

"San Diego Zoo joins a heck of an effort: to save the Tasmanian devil" LA Times

Mar 2014

Related research articles

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