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Industry and community projects

3000 level - projects and partners

The following projects are 3000 level units. If you’re studying in a Bachelor of Advanced Studies, see information on our 4000 level projects.

Because industry and community projects are run in collaboration with partners outside of the University, project partners and topics are subject to change prior to the start of teaching.

If you have any questions about the projects, you can email pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au or the project supervisor listed in each project. 

Availability of projects

Places in each project are limited so we encourage you to register early to avoid missing out.

You will only see projects that are available for your enrolled shell unit and still have places available. If you can’t see a project when you register, you will need to select a different project. Project availability is subject to change.

Intensives

Intensives are full-time equivalent offerings, and the exact timing of each day is outlined in the intensive timetable below. Students are expected to attend the scheduled class times for the relevant session.

In 2023, intensives projects will be delivered face-to-face on campus. For our February intensives, online learning options will be available to offshore students enrolling in ‘Remote – Online’ units only. All other intensive sessions will be delivered face-to face on campus only.

If you have any questions about a specific intensive project please email the relevant project supervisor, for any other questions please contact pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au.

February intensives take place over 4 weeks from 23 January to 17 February 2023. Timetable is shown below. 

July intensives take place over 4 weeks from 19 June to 14 July 2023. Timetable details to be released in May 2023.

August intensives take place over 6 weeks from 24 July – 1 September 2023 Timetable details to be released in May 2023.

October intensives take place over 6 weeks from 18 September to Friday 27 October. Timetable details to be released in August 2023.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Timetable

February intensive projects take place over 4 weeks from 23 January till 17 February 2023.

There will only be one class per project. Please consider the project timetable before registering for a project and make sure that you are available for the allocated class times.

Projects will be delivered face-to-face on campus. For some projects, online learning options will be available to offshore students enrolling in ‘Remote – Online’ units only.

It will take 7-9 days for your personal timetable to reflect your project registration. If you are an offshore student attending online, you will be emailed the zoom link by your Project Supervisor when the project starts via Canvas.

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Week 1

10 am - 1 pm

2 pm - 4 pm

10 am - 1 pm 10 am - 1 pm Australia Day

10 am - 1 pm

2 pm - 4 pm

Week 2 10 am - 1 pm   10 am - 1 pm 10 am - 1 pm

10 am - 1 pm

2 pm - 4 pm

Week 3 10 am - 1 pm   10 am - 1 pm 10 am - 2 pm 10 am - 1 pm
Week 4 10 am - 12 pm     10 am - 12 pm  

Students are expected to contribute a total of 120 – 150 hours of effort towards the intensive unit which includes 47 hours of scheduled classes plus an additional 73 – 103 hours (18 - 26 hours per week) outside of class times.

Adobe – Big Data Big Insights

As we enter an era where digital and physical technologies are integrated across all industries and business areas, companies of all sizes are amassing more data than ever before. With such importance, value, and often reliance now placed on data insights it is imperative to be equipped with the right digital literacy skills; ensuring capability to comprehend, interpret, and communicate the ‘story’, data insights reveal to various audience and stakeholders. What is the future of data and how can businesses best ensure they are equipped with the right tools, resources, and capability to utilise data in a meaningful way. In this project you will investigate the art of data storytelling to formulate strategies and frameworks for how businesses can use their data to make informed business decisions, improve business services, enhance user experiences, and focused talent recruitment.

Delivery mode: In -person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Project Supervisor: Sonia Khosa, sonia.khosa@sydney.edu.au

Mission Australia - Reducing the Impacts of Climate Change on People Experiencing Disadvantage

The effects of climate change impact disproportionately the most vulnerable people in our society. Impacts being experienced include increasing extreme weather and natural disasters, rising energy and utilities bills and food affordability and availability, as well as resultant health impacts. People on low incomes are less likely to be able to mitigate or remediate the impacts experienced as the climate changes. Climate change needs urgent action and a meaningful climate change response requires actions from all citizens. Climate change mitigation strategies can also improve food security and financial security for people experiencing disadvantage. In this project you will explore ways to support people experiencing disadvantage to build resilience to the effects of climate change, reduce their vulnerability to climate change and respond to natural disasters.

Delivery mode: In -person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Project Supervisor: Abe Bakar, abe.bakar@sydney.edu.au

Argyle Food Group and Meat and Livestock Australia - Carbon Neutrality and Consumer Perception in the Meat and Livestock Industry 

Australian agricultural products, particularly red meat, is increasingly coming under pressure from consumers and government to deliver more sustainable products. Argyle Food Group takes their commitment to the land and the environment seriously and are investing in every aspect to make thier livestock production more sustainable, including undertaking carbon and biodiversity projects to support existing regenerative agricultural practices. Argyle Food Group works closely with the Meat and Livestock Australia who have set out to establish Australia as a world leader in environmental sustainability and set the ambitious target to be Carbon Neutral by 2030. By 2030, Australian beef, lamb and goat production, including grazing, lot feeding and meat processing, will be making significant progress toward zero net release of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. However, for Argyle Food Group as a red meat company, it is unclear exactly what this means to consumers and what they need to do to demonstrate thier sustainability credentials and create a trusted product.  In this project students will work in interdisciplinary groups to understand current consumer perceptions and come up with solutions for how Meat and Livestock Australia and Argyle Food Group can position themselves to consumers as trusted world leaders in sustainability. 

Delivery mode: In -person (CC) 

Project Supervisor: Bruce Chapman, bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

Details on our July intensives projects will be available here in May 2023.

Details on our August intensives projects will be available here in May 2023.

Details on our October intensives projects will be available here in August 2023.

Semester-long projects

Semester 1 projects will commence 20 February 2023. Students are expected to attend scheduled class times for 3 hours per week.

2023 semester-long projects will be delivered in-person on campus, with online learning options for offshore students only.

If you have any questions about a specific project please email the relevant project supervisor. For all other questions please contact pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Timetable

Industry partner and project Timetable Delivery mode*
Allianz Australia Insurance
Reducing our digital and carbon emissions
Monday 12 pm – 3 pm CC
Bridge Housing
Community engagement of social and affordable housing residents
Monday 2 pm– 5 pm CC
RE
Ernst and Young Australia and The University of Sydney
Student success at the heart of the University
Wednesday 9 am – 12 pm CC
Elizabeth Broderick and Co
Putting intersectionality at the heart of gender equality policies
Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm CC
RE
Gilbert and Tobin
Towards a sustainable energy transition
Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm CC
nandin Innovation Centre
Supporting startups to generate valuable opportunities in sustainability
Friday 9 am – 12 pm CC
nandin Innovation Centre
Supporting startups to generate valuable opportunities with technology in a post COVID world
Friday 9 am – 12 pm CC
North Coast Aboriginal Development Alliance
Supporting responsive flood recovery with aboriginal communities
Monday 4 - 6 pm Wednesday 5 - 6 pm CC
PTW Architects
Building for a sustainable future
Monday 9 am – 12 pm CC
Solve-TAD
Enhancing services for children living with disability
Friday 1 - 4 pm CC
RE
Tata India
The future of automotive and mobility
Wednesday 3 – 6 pm CC
RE
TerraCycle
Reengaging schools with advanced recycling programs
Tuesday 12 pm – 3 pm CC
RE
Universities Admission Centre
Reimagining university admissions for wider access to higher education
Wednesday 9 am – 12 pm CC
Westpac Banking Corporation
Using digital technologies to improve user experience
Friday 9 am – 12 pm CC
Youth Justice NSW
Multicultural practice and outcomes in the Youth Justice System
Wednesday 12 – 3 pm CC

* CC is Camperdown/Darlington campus, the project will be delivered in-person. RE is remote for offshore students only.

Allianz – Reducing our digital and carbon emissions

Stakeholders across industry, government, arts, sciences, designers, and engineering (to name a few) are employing their disciplinary expertise and creativity to innovate for global reduction in CO2 emissions. For Allianz, limiting global warming and countering climate change to secure a healthy planet is a crucial priority.  Allianz has been carbon-neutral since 2012. We collaborate with external organisations such as the Science-based Targets initiative (SBTi), which compels members to set long-term emissions reduction targets to lead the way to a zero-carbon economy. We identify and manage climate-related risks and opportunities within our business operations, products and services. We systematically assess our insurance business and our propriety investments against ESG criteria, considering matters such as carbon emissions, energy efficiency and biodiversity. At the core of every business is its people: we want to further engage Allianz employees on issues of climate change, greenhouse gas reduction and carbon emissions. In this project students will work in interdisciplinary groups to produce creative solutions aimed at educating and raising awareness to motivate Allianz employees to reduce their carbon and digital emissions.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Monday 12 – 3 pm

Project Supervisor: Jennifer Fletcher, jennifer.fletcher@sydney.edu.au

Bridge Housing - Community Engagement of Social and Affordable Housing Residents

Social housing residents are some of the most vulnerable people in our community. Bridge Housing currently manages a portfolio of 3,500 properties providing a safe, secure and affordable home for over 5,500 residents. Our residents are particularly vulnerable to social isolation as they are predominantly single, ageing and/or have a disability. Many have entered Bridge Housing from homelessness, with past histories of domestic violence, trauma, addiction or mental health crisis. Bridge Housing is more than a landlord, we also focus on supporting residents to sustain their tenancies, to have a say in our service delivery and to access opportunities in the broader community. Our Sustainable Communities Team focuses on community development activities of benefit to our resident communities and our Building Bridges Strategy provides a framework for our work. Our questions relate to deepening our community engagement approach with residents. What are some of the best practice approaches to engagement for vulnerable social housing residents? How can we best leverage technology to support our community engagement work? What is some of the latest innovations in relation to reducing social isolation and giving tenants a say in our services? Are different approaches needed for different cohorts?

Delivery mode: In-person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Timetable: Mondays 2 pm – 5 pm 

Project Supervisor: Monica Marzouk, monica.marzouk@sydney.edu.au

Elizabeth Broderick & Co – Putting Intersectionality at the Heart of Gender Equality Policies

Gender equality strategies have typically treated women and girls as one monolithic group, often making the diverse experiences amongst women and girls invisible. There has also been the assumption that strategies targeted to women and girls will automatically benefit all women and girls. However, by assuming that all women and girls have the same experience, gender equality policies end up inadvertently benefitting more privileged women and girls and reinforcing intersectional inequalities. Too often ‘intersectionality’ becomes a last minute ‘add-on’ rather than integrated from the start. How can we design gender equality policies to be more responsive to intersectionality? How can we ensure they reach and benefit all women? The UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women and Girls is examining effective approaches to embed intersectionality in policies to advance gender equality. Against this background, this project will involve exploring ‘what works’ to integrate an intersectional approach within gender equality policies across three domains: violence against women, women’s political participation and women’s economic empowerment. The project will draw on insights from research and case studies of promising practices from across the globe and highlight leading practice examples. Projects will make recommendations on actions that governments and other actors can take.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Timetable: Tuesdays 9 am – 12 pm  

Project Supervisor: Jinqi Xu, jinqi.xu@sydney.edu.au  

Ernst and Young and University of Sydney - Student success at the heart of the University

The University of Sydney released its 10-year strategy in August 2022, with an ambitious goal to become one of the world’s truly great universities. A key aspiration of the strategy is that every Sydney student – from recent school leavers preparing for their first professional job to those seeking targeted development opportunities throughout their lives – to know the whole University community is invested in their success. To progress towards this goal, we need to form a richer understanding of what our diverse community of learners understands to be ‘success’, what their current experiences look like, and how we can better support them to achieve their goals. Among many other directions, this project could address questions of equity and support for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Or, it could look at the development of learning experiences and assessments that prepare students authentically for who they want to become. Or, it could interrogate the ways in which we come together (physical and digital) to foster community in the broadest sense. In this project, in collaboration with the USyd VP-Strategy team and experts from EY, we ask you to develop recommendations for what we might do over the next three years to address these questions. Many perspectives may be instructive to informing this question, including education or anthropology, market research and management, ethics and data science, software development and engineering, law and political studies, or architecture and design.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Wednesdays 9 am – 12 pm

Project Supervisor: Fabian Held, fabian.held@sydney.edu.au

Gilbert & Tobin – Towards a sustainable energy transition

The energy transition is one of the great endeavours of our age, both as decisive action to combat climate change and as a key step towards a new way of doing business. The uptake of renewable generation has, however, created new challenges that must be overcome to achieve a properly sustainable solution. Such challenges (and opportunities) might include for example: How do we keep the lights on after coal? Does renewable generation have a social licence at the scale required to decarbonise the economy? What technology mix can balance peaks and troughs of generation across days, weeks and seasons? Can hydrogen be both a cost effective and a sustainable means of energy storage in the Australian context? Is there a place for nuclear energy in solving these challenges? How can we utilise undispatched generation? What legislative scheme would best manage the recycling of solar and wind farm components and who should pay? In this project, students will examine the challenges and opportunities posed by the energy transition and will work in interdisciplinary teams to propose sustainable ways of achieving it.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Tuesdays 9 am – 12 pm  

Project Supervisor: Laura Kotevska, laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

nandin Innovation Centre - Supporting Startups to Generate Valuable Opportunities in Sustainability 

At nandin, imaginative and inventive minds come together to challenge, design, create and innovate. As ANSTO’s platform for design, innovation, and commercialisation, nandin is at the heart of deep technology innovation, supporting entrepreneurs and SMEs to start, scale and grow their business. The University of Sydney has partnered with 8 nandin businesses to provide students the opportunity to collaborate directly with founders on real challenges they face in their businesses. In this project students will work in interdisciplinary groups on one of the four topics with nandin startup founders focusing on the theme of sustainability. Areas to explore within this project include air quality and green building design with bioair, making sustainability accessible and affordable for all with EoT, sustainable long-term decision-making for councils with SVSR and water sustainability in healthcare structures with Enware.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Fridays 9 am – 12 pm

Project Supervisor: Fabian Held, fabian.held@sydney.edu.au

nandin Innovation Centre - Supporting Startups to Generate Valuable Opportunities with Technology in a Post COVID World

At nandin, imaginative and inventive minds come together to challenge, design, create and innovate. As ANSTO’s platform for design, innovation, and commercialisation, nandin is at the heart of deep technology innovation, supporting entrepreneurs and SMEs to start, scale and grow their business. The University of Sydney has partnered with 8 nandin businesses to provide students the opportunity to collaborate directly with founders on real challenges they face in their businesses.  In this project students will work in interdisciplinary groups on one of the four topics with nandin startup founders focusing on the themes of technology and a post-COVID world. Areas to explore within this project include workspaces of the future in a post-covid world with CoUspace, building trust around cleanliness in high traffic environments with elavo, improving online learning and training environments with MAS Management Systems and creating a smarter care approach for the future of ageing with Crypses.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Fridays 9 am – 12 pm

Project Supervisor: Bruce Chapman, bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

North Coast Aboriginal Development Alliance - Supporting Responsive Flood Recovery with Aboriginal Communities

This ICPU project will be delivered in partnership with SLIC (Service Learning in Indigenous Communities). For this project students will be working directly with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Therefore, students are required to complete an interview process to partake in this ICPU. Please read the information carefully on the SLIC website to ensure you understand what is required from participants of this project.

The project builds upon a 2021 SLIC/NCADA project in which 23 SLIC students conducted interviews with Aboriginal service providers and NCADA partners working across housing, youth and women’s wellbeing and services to small communities on the NSW north coast. The students documented many complex challenges for NCADA. In 2022, the north coast was hit multiple times with excessive rainfall and extensive flooding, propelling a housing shortage that was already extreme for Aboriginal residents into a shelter and housing crisis. Planning for recovery out of this crisis is difficult without a clear indication of the state of housing and the kinds of reparations most needed to make housing safe and healthy for occupants and without clear understanding of the most pressing wellbeing support needs. Students will produce group reports that detail what they learn from speaking to community partners and householders about the state of their housing and its impacts on wellbeing across the community. This information will be provided back to NCADA to enhance their strategic planning, resource allocation and decision making to provide the best possible support for effective recovery and resilience-building against future disasters for Aboriginal people.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Mondays 4 – 6 pm and Wednesdays 5 – 6 pm

For any questions regarding the SLIC ICPU please contact slic.info@sydney.edu.au.

PTW Architects – Building for a Sustainable Future

Our world is changing. Much of our built environment was created to suit other times and is now in need of renewal. We have an opportunity to adapt existing, underutilised environments to suit current needs. How do we make the most of the opportunity to reinvent the places and spaces in which we live, work, transact and socialise, in ways that respond to contemporary human needs, but are also sustainable? This project invites students to find areas ripe for change - empty car parks, abandoned office buildings, redundant industrial areas, disused land and propose how these environments can be transformed to contribute to sustainable cities of the future. Working in groups to leverage your diverse perspectives, you may choose to explore local, regional, or global shifts in urban living, working to understand the different needs of the stakeholders (community groups, governments, businesses, etc.) that shape the evolving needs of the city. Collaborating in interdisciplinary groups  

students can identify the most pressing environmental challenges in an urban context or consider technological advancements that bring us closer to harmonious solutions for a sustainable future. 

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Monday 9 am – 12 pm

Project Supervisor: Laura Kotevska, laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

Solve-TAD - Enhancing Services for Children Living with Disability

Solve-TAD’s unique value proposition as a disability service provider is the after-market customisation it offers its clients. In a competitive marketplace and in a context of multiple drivers of disruption, it is an opportune time to deep dive into how Solve-TAD can grow its relevance and quality of service for clients. The transition in 2016 to a ‘National Disability Insurance Scheme’ (NDIS) in Australia, significantly reshaped the operating environment within which Solve-TAD delivers its services. In turn, new technologies such as microcontrollers, 3D printing, and the internet have the potential to more radically transform the lives of people with disabilities. However, most of the Solve-TAD volunteer workforce falls within an older demographic, and many volunteers are inexperienced when it comes to developing cutting-edge technical solutions.  In this project, you will explore how Solve-TAD can navigate an increasingly complex operating environment – including changing technology, production processes, market landscape and volunteering industry – to help broaden its reach and impact. Specifically, you will focus on how the organisation can enhance its services for children living with disability. Interdisciplinary groups are encouraged to focus on a specific aspect of this complex problem to deliver core insights, recommendations and possibly even solutions for the organisation. 

Delivery mode: In-person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Timetable: Fridays 1 – 4 pm

Project Supervisor: Bruce Chapman, bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

TATA India - The Future of Automotive and Mobility 

Tata Autocomp Systems is a leading supplier of automobile components and engineering services. Tata AutoComp has a presence in 7 countries with 51 manufacturing facilities spread across India and 8 facilities spread across North America, Latin America, Europe, and China. Some of its leading clients include Jaguar Land Rover, Tata Motors, Mercedes Benz, Ford, Audi and Volkswagen. Tata AutoComp Systems business requires it to be future ready to meet the ever-changing technology landscape and demands of the growing automotive industry. While the organization has ventured into Electric Vehicles, as well as Automotive Power Electronic components, it is imperative for us to constantly innovate, learn and adopt new technology and products to stay ahead of the curve in the future of automotive and mobility. In this project, students will evaluate and research the latest technology and product requirements in the automotive industry and provide recommendations on new technology and products TATA AutoComp can adopt, as well as potential expansion into new geographic markets.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Timetable: Wednesdays 3 – 6 pm 

Project Supervisor: Sonia Khosa, sonia.khosa@sydney.edu.au  

TerraCycle - Reengaging Schools with Advanced Recycling Programs 

TerraCycle is on a mission to Eliminate the Idea of waste. Thousands of products pass through everyone’s hands each day, usually ending up in landfill, without a recycling solution available. TerraCycle engages thousands of schools and local communities around Australia to collect and recycle used products and turn them into new products, materials, or even art. Through our free recycling programs, we are able to educate students about the end of life of their products, teach them about recycling and offer fundraising opportunities for schools. Throughout COVID, however, our ability to engage and interact with school communities has diminished. How would you re-engage schools and students to revive their education programs around recycling and embed mindful consumption and sustainable practices into the hearts of the emerging generation? Through this project you'll have the opportunity to analyse how schools in Australia are currently recycling and determine if there are opportunities to improve recycling processes, facilities and student education, with available programs in Australia or even to adopt more advanced processes that may exist around the world.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC) & Remote (RE for offshore students only)

Timetable: Tuesdays 12 – 3 pm

Project Supervisor: Maria Amigo, maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

Universities Admissions Centre - Reimagining University Admissions for Wider Access to Higher Education 

Currently university admission is predominantly a numbers game and the personal attributes of an applicant, critical thinking, digital literacy, problem solving etc., are generally inferred from academic qualifications rather than specifically assessed as part of admissions. However, there is now a strong push for universities to admit students on broader criteria, while still ensuring that students are well prepared academically for university study. In this project, students may wish to consider how the current ATAR-based admission system works and how the key characteristics and attributes can be improved. Exploration of alternative models and frameworks used in other countries may be useful in determining the aspects of the current system that are worth retaining. Students are encouraged to propose new models including whether any new technologies can be leveraged to improve outcomes. Students must consider the implications of any recommended changes to the equitable allocation of university places, ensuring no group is significantly advantaged or disadvantaged.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Wednesdays 9 am – 12 pm

Project Supervisor: Jinqi Xu, jinqi.xu@sydney.edu.au

Westpac - Using Digital Technologies to Improve User Experiences 

Westpac is Australia’s oldest bank and company; they provide a broad range of banking and financial services. Westpac is focused on helping Australians succeed, ensuring customers can save and invest with confidence. Helping with the financial needs of small businesses, multi-national corporates, institutional and government clients, Westpac puts customers at the centre of everything they do. Westpac want to ensure the experiences for their customers and staff are quick and effortless, using technology to improve productivity, whilst focussing on user experience. In this project you will work in mixed disciplinary groups to explore solutions that take advantage of ways in which digital technologies can be used to deliver superior personalised services for customers or staff, to help put customers in control of their finances and to better understand and anticipate customer or staff needs. At the end of the project, you will pitch an innovative idea to help Westpac improve productivity or the experience of customers or staff in their branches, contact centres, corporate offices or in digital channels. 

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Fridays 9 am – 12 pm

Project Supervisor: Sonia Khosa, sonia.khosa@sydney.edu.au  

Youth Justice NSW - Multicultural Practice and Outcomes in the Youth Justice System

The cohort of young people in contact with the youth justice system in NSW is multiculturally diverse, with some groups disproportionally overrepresented. The overrepresentation of Aboriginal young people in the youth justice system and the poorer outcomes achieved from public services for Aboriginal people more broadly is well documented. However, little is known about the efficacy and experiences that young people from other cultural backgrounds have when involved in mandated services. Youth Justice NSW seeks to further understand the unique culture background of youth from Pacific Islander, Arab, New Zealand and African origins. Importantly, to understand how insights into culture and culturally appropriate practices might be leveraged for effective intervention and to improve outcomes for all in the Youth Justice System. In this project, interdisciplinary teams are asked to produce actionable insights on the experiences and possible interventions for young people from diverse backgrounds across Youth NSW services. Students will explore the ways in which services and thereby outcomes could be enhanced for specific young people of Pacific Communities (including Māori) backgrounds, young people from African countries (and refugee or refugee-like) and young people from Arabic-speaking backgrounds.

Delivery mode: In-person (CC)

Timetable: Wednesdays 12 – 3 pm

Project Supervisor: Maria Amigo, maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

Details on our semester 2 projects will be available here in May 2023.

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Last updated: 23 January 2023

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