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Industry and community projects

3000 level - projects and partners

The following projects are 3000 level units. If you’re studying in a Bachelor of Advanced Studies, see information on our 4000 level projects.

Because industry and community projects are run in collaboration with partners outside of the University, project partners and topics are subject to change prior to the start of teaching.

If you have any questions about the projects, you can email pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au

Availability of projects

Places in each project are limited so we encourage you to register early to avoid missing out.

You will only see projects that are available for your enrolled shell unit and still have places available. If you can’t see a project when you register, you will need to select a different project. Project availability is subject to change.

Intensives

February intensives take place over 4 weeks from 17 January to 11 February 2022.

July intensives take place over 4 weeks from 20 June to 15 July 2022.

Intensives are full time equivalent offerings, the exact timing of each day will be determined by your project supervisor. If you anticipate being unable to commit to the time expected, please contact your project supervisor.2022 intensive projects will be delivered in-person on campus, with online learning options for those unable to come onto campus. If you have any questions about a specific intensive project please email the relevant project supervisor, for any other questions please contact pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Chau Chak Wing Museum - Reframing the Museum for Impact

Bringing together the University of Sydney’s fascinating scientific, artistic, and archaeological collections, the Chau Chak Wing Museum (CCWM) is Sydney’s newest cultural beacon, offering visitors state-of-the-art exhibitions, galleries and learning spaces. Yet, despite our world-class offerings, the CCWM’s following tends towards school groups, some university students and retirees – how do we reach everyone else? How can we reimagine our programs, onsite and online, to get new audiences excited about the CCWM? Where are the highest-potential areas for growth? In this project, you will devise new ways for the CCWM to become more relevant, accessible and engaging for broader audiences, and a must-see destination for any visit to Sydney.

Project supervisor: Helena Robinson – helena.robinson@sydney.edu.au

KPMG - Disrupting Business as Usual to Create ESG Futures

Environment, Social and Governance (ESG) factors are becoming increasingly significant to the growth opportunities of organisations. ESG is predicted to be at the core of every successful business strategy in the next decade; with consumers expecting organisations to act in a manner conscientious of social and environmental factors. Thus, new opportunities for innovation are emerging everywhere from supply chains, product design and data, to community engagement and organisational management. What does a leading ESG organisation look like in 2025? What challenges will organisations have to overcome in bringing an ESG focus to their business models? How can digital transformation and technology enable this transition? What adjacent industries will emerge from bringing a focus to ESG factors? What are the key customer problems that organisations will be solving? In this project, students will explore ESG business transformation and identify emerging opportunities for professional service firms and beyond.

Project supervisor: Bruce Chapman - bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

Solve-TAD - Using Assistive Technology to Change Children’s Lives

You are the parent of twin girls aged 5, Ella who has a disability and Louise who does not. You love to cycle together as a family, but Ella misses out because she cannot ride a standard bike. You are heartbroken that Ella may never experience an important part of growing up and the sense of accomplishment and freedom that comes with learning to ride a bike. Solve-TAD changes the lives of children just like Ella by providing personalised technology, equipment and services. We have over 200 volunteers who dedicate their time, skills and energy to produce life-changing solutions including Freedom Wheels bikes. Solve-TAD aspires to help everyone in the community regardless of location, cultural background and financial means. In this project, you will explore how Solve-TAD can increase its impact on children living with a disability to reduce barriers they may experience in home, school and play. Specifically, you will examine how Solve-TAD can navigate an increasingly complex operating environment – including changing technology, production processes, market landscape and volunteering industry – to help broaden its reach and impact.

Project Supervisor: Elisabeth Valiente-Riedl - elisabeth.valiente-riedl@sydney.edu.au

Cartier - Breaking the Mould of Traditional Retail

With customers empowered to easily switch providers or substitute products, more than ever it is critical to provide quality customer experiences. Brands need to continually improve the customer experience by providing personalised and superior purchasing experiences. Cartier is a luxury designer brand creating jewellery, watches, and perfumes. At Cartier, the customer experience is at the centre of everything we do, and we want to further understand our clients' behaviours and preferences. Students are encouraged to use an interdisciplinary lens to investigate clients’ patterns and identify their behaviours and preferences particularly in the luxury industry. Students will explore how Cartier can further enhance customer experiences and pitch ideas as to how Cartier can innovate and change the way retail is traditionally done.

Project supervisor: Jinqi Xu – jinqi.xu@sydney.edu.au

Chau Chak Wing Museum - A Museum for the Future

The Chau Chak Wing Museum at the University of Sydney was designed with environmental factors in mind and complies with the University of Sydney’s sustainability goals. However, museums have overly complex and specific needs to care for collections and visitors, and this can create a sustainability challenge. For example, maintaining the required temperature and humidity range for museum storage and display areas requires 24-hour energy consumption, and it can be difficult to recycle or reuse tailor-made furniture, object mounts and other materials used in temporary exhibitions. The University has just announced updated sustainability goals, and now the museum must re-evaluate how we can improve our sustainability. In this project, students will be challenged to develop creative solutions for the museum’s ongoing sustainability across various areas of operation, assessing our strategic objectives against evolving sustainability goals and constraints.

Project supervisor: Helena Robinson – Helena.robinson@sydney.edu.au

Elizabeth Broderick and Co - Putting Intersectionality at the Heart of Gender Equality

Gender equality strategies have typically treated women and girls as one monolithic group, often making the diverse experiences amongst women and girls invisible. There has also been the assumption that strategies targeted to women and girls will automatically benefit all women and girls. However, by assuming that all women and girls have the same experience, gender equality policies end up inadvertently benefitting more privileged women and girls and reinforcing intersectional inequalities. Too often ‘intersectionality’ becomes a last minute ‘add-on’ rather than integrated from the start. How can we design gender equality policies to be more responsive to intersectionality? How can we ensure they reach and benefit all women? The UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women and Girls is examining effective approaches to embed intersectionality in policies to advance gender equality. Against this background, this project will involve exploring ‘what works’ to integrate an intersectional approach within gender equality policies across three domains: violence against women, women’s political participation and women’s economic empowerment. The project will draw on insights from research and case studies of promising practices from across the globe and highlight leading practice examples. Projects will make recommendations on actions that governments and other actors can take.

Project supervisor: Maria Amigo – maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

Harris Farm Markets – Reducing Emissions from Farm to Plate

Climate action needs to be accelerated to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and transition to resilient and regenerative business models. Insetting is a strategy for companies to invest in value chain partners, both downstream and upstream, to support the transition to more sustainable practices. For example, a food retailer may engage in carbon insetting by supporting producers to reduce their carbon footprint through agroforestry or adoption of regenerative farming practices in order to sequester carbon. Alternatively, companies may invest in initiatives that encourage their staff to adopt low emission means of travelling to and from work. Insetting increases capacity for improved sustainability within the boundaries of the value chain. In short, insetting is about harmonising companies with nature from within. While insetting can address some of the concerns related to offsetting being used as a licence to emit, it relies on exerting influence over third party emissions (ie. scope 3 emissions) in the value chain and hence is dependent on building relationships that go beyond financial transactions. In this project you will explore what insetting opportunities are available to Harris Farm Markets? What role can Harris Farm play in helping the transition to regenerative farming so farmers can derive value from their time and initial investment? How could carbon insetting help create a carbon positive shopping experience for customers? How can Harris Farm contribute to programs that divert plastic packaging and food waste from landfills?

Project supervisor: Robyn McConchie – robyn.mcconchie@sydney.edu.au

HSBC UK – Reimagining Stakeholder Experiences

The past few years have created a great deal of change for our customers, employees and the communities we serve. To support our customers and the communities we serve, HSBC provided a series of support packages, including both government schemes and non-government scheme lending, totalling £15.5bn. As we continually evolve and aim to support customers, employees, and the communities we serve, we seek to bounce back better than ever. We are asking students to investigate how we can continually improve the way we cater to the needs of various stakeholders, including customers, employees, shareholders, and competitors, in line with our values and strategy. Students can explore improvement in areas such as sustainability, cross-segment collaboration, digital enhancements, industry specific improvements and business client support.

Please note that due to the industry partner being based in the UK, sessions with the industry partner will be conducted virtually from 6pm to accommodate the time differences.

Project supervisor: Camilla Scanlan – camilla.scanlan@sydney.edu.au

JLL Australia - Innovative Repurposing of Urban Spaces

Cities are sprawling outwards like never before, creating commuting challenges and congestion, while housing affordability is declining. We are seeing innovative use of unused spaces such as rooftop vegetable gardens and carpark basements converted to urban farms. The home office is replacing traditional office spaces, and traditional offices are now offering additional tenant benefits such as gyms. The status quo is being even further challenged by the shifts in the workplace due to the pandemic. We have an opportunity to adapt existing, underutilised environments to suit current needs. How do we make the most of the opportunity to reinvent these places and spaces in in ways that cater to current societal needs, but are also sustainable? This project invites students to explore where we can innovate in the repurposing and reuse of urban spaces and places to improve lifestyle, sustainability outcomes and combat urban sprawl.

Project supervisor: Laura Kotevska - laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

KPMG. Commonwealth Bank, Ferrero, illycaffe and TheEuropean Commission- Rethinking Food Systems for Better Health and Sustainability (in partnership with Padova University, Italy)

This project will be run in conjunction with Padova University (Italy) and the class will be made up of half University of Sydney students and half Padova University students. You will also engage with Italian industry partners. Due to the involvement of Padova University students and Italian industry partners, this project is timetabled from 4:30pm – 7:30pm Monday to Friday over the July intensive period to accommodate the time differences.

Food is central to family, cultural and community identity. It is essential to sustain life and food-related activities, provide income and livelihoods for billions of people on earth. With the continuing rise in global food production and manufacturing to meet increasing demand and the additional impact on ecosystems and climate, there is a pressing need to rethink our food systems. In this project, student teams representing unique mixes of disciplines will explore questions such as: How can we transform food systems so it can meet the changing needs of consumers in a more sustainable way? What role can consumers, producers, manufacturers, industry leaders and government play to achieve ambitious targets? How can we rewrite the narrative of food production and supply to reflect a progressive industry that will engage a diverse future workforce and facilitate a more comprehensive approach to solving complex issues within the sector? Through collaborative research into these areas, students will provide solutions on how we can rethink food systems for better health and sustainability.

Project supervisor: Rosalind Deaker – rosalind.deaker@sydney.edu.au

NewsCorp - The Future of the Subscription Economy

Consumers have begun fundamentally re-assessing their traditional perceptions of ‘ownership’, with today’s consumers preferring the advantages of access and value, over the complexity (and wastage) of ownership. It is no longer just internet services like Netflix and Spotify; even firms like Porsche and Volvo are reinventing themselves as solutions providers – moving into the business of ‘mobility as a lifestyle’, rather than just selling cars. In this project, you will explore the future of the subscription economy. What are the ingredients that create subscription services that truly delight? What are the emerging consumer behaviours, needs, and economic choices that will drive customers towards (or away from) these service models? And in a future where subscriptions will permeate every context of our lives, how might companies differentiate themselves from the pack, and communicate their value proposition to consumers? You are encouraged to create a perspective that is future-proof but grounded in customer insights. With a clear view on the design principles, value-drivers, economics, and brand considerations that will deliver exceptional subscription experiences over the next decade.

Project supervisor: Geoffrey Harrison - geoffrey.harrison@sydney.edu.au

Solve-TAD - Using Assistive Technology to Change Children’s Lives

You are the parent of twin girls aged 5, Ella who has a disability and Louise who does not. You love to cycle together as a family, but Ella misses out because she cannot ride a standard bike. You are heartbroken that Ella may never experience an important part of growing up and the sense of accomplishment and freedom that comes with learning to ride a bike. Solve-TAD changes the lives of children just like Ella by providing personalised technology, equipment, and services. We have over 200 volunteers who dedicate their time, skills, and energy to produce life-changing solutions including Freedom Wheels bikes. Solve-TAD aspires to help everyone in the community regardless of location, cultural background, and financial means. In this project, you will explore how Solve-TAD can increase its impact on children living with a disability to reduce barriers they may experience in home, school, and play. Specifically, you will examine how Solve-TAD can navigate an increasingly complex operating environment – including changing technology, production processes, market landscape and volunteering industry – to help broaden its reach and impact.

Project supervisor: Monica Marzouk - monica.marzouk@sydney.edu.au

Semester-long projects

Semester 1 projects will commence 21 February 2022. Students are expected to attend scheduled class times for 3 hours per week.

2022 semester-long projects will be delivered in-person on campus, with online learning options for those unable to come onto campus. The classroom/venue will be communicated by your project supervisor upon project start via Canvas.

If you have any questions about a specific project please email the relevant project supervisor, for all other questions please contact pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Accenture - Ethical Technology for Better Public Health Outcomes

Public health measures have become a cornerstone of pandemic management in Australia and globally. As governments attempt to set policies and regulations on the far side of the pandemic, much of the advice has been premised on knowing the movements and health characteristics of individuals: are they vaccinated or not? Have they travelled widely (or not)? To date, the challenge of citizen accountability has been solved through technology that links our health records to our government service apps. However, is this a silver bullet? Technology is being employed to make the process ‘easier’ but raises a number of complex issues that require careful deliberation. How can technological solutions cater to digitally excluded individuals i.e. people who do not have access to technology, have difficulty using, or object to the sharing of health information? How can the technological solutions governments develop be secure, transparent, and accountable and how can the information they collect about their citizens be appropriately safeguarded or avoid function creep? For this project, you will examine the technological, social and policy dimensions of this problem and develop proposals for how governments can navigate this complex environment given the policy pressures unique to Australia.

Project Supervisor: Laura Kotevska – laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

Adobe - Closing the Digital Skills Gap

Technology is rapidly growing and transforming on a daily basis and organisations have been forced to be more dynamic, agile, and adaptable to survive in this changing environment. Much of this survival is hinged upon employing a versatile workforce with the necessary skills and experience required to address this technological revolution. However, industry is struggling to find talent with these required digital skills. How might this skills shortage be addressed and who is responsible for closing the digital skills gap? In this project, you will investigate the future of education and look to formulate creative and innovative ways that businesses, schools, universities, and governments can tackle industry skills shortages. You are encouraged to find tangible solutions that address the future of education so that human talent aligns with technological advancement.

Project Supervisor: Jessica Kean – jessica.kean@sydney.edu.au

Allianz - Mental Health and Wellbeing at Work

Employee mental health and well-being is imperative for Allianz. As the next generation enters the workforce, a key enterprise-wide focus is on the various factors that affect employee mental health and their well-being at work. Traditionally, mental health focused on individuals and their immediate social, family and environmental sphere of influence. However, the ways in which young people connect, communicate and engage with the world around them has undergone rapid change. Furthermore, current and future generations of young people face increasing socio‐economic, political and environmental uncertainty on a global level. Students in this project will work in interdisciplinary teams to explore a wide range of influences on the next generation’s mental health at work. Developing a future enterprise-wide strategy for Allianz that will administer a positive impact on the mental health and well-being of the next generation entering the workplace.

Project Supervisor: Jennifer Fletcher – jennifer.fletcher@sydney.edu.au

ANZ – Data Privacy and Ethical Design

The impacts of data are enormous, delivering recommendations about what to watch on television, suggestions about what to study, insights into our health and wellbeing, and information about tailored product offerings. Yet these innovations, which can vastly improve our quality of life, present challenges and invite moral deliberation. In some cases, innovations cause unintended harm, violate informational privacy or result in discrimination. Long after Forbes declared that privacy was “completely and utterly dead”, citizens, including corporate citizens like ANZ, have privacy and the ethical uses of data front of mind. In this project, your group will examine principles of data ethics and use these to develop an innovative strategy or banking solution that has the potential to do good. As part of achieving this goal, interdisciplinary teams can examine how ANZ can implement a data strategy that will mitigate the risk of unintended harm, increase freedom of choice and equity, and preserve individual rights.

Project Supervisor: Laura Kotevska – laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

Elizabeth Broderick & Co - Building Men’s Accountability for Ending violence Against Women

Violence against women and girls persists at alarming rates as a universal problem affecting women in all countries, across all socio-economic groups, locations and education levels. What is the role of men in ending violence against women and girls? The collective efforts of women’s rights organisations have been and continue to be largely responsible for advocating for laws, services and prevention responses to address violence against women. However, without men’s engagement and accountability for change – in fostering equal and respectful relationships, challenging violence and abuse, and fostering social norms of respect and equality - efforts to reduce and prevent violence against women will not succeed. What are effective and promising approaches to engage and build men’s accountability for driving change? The United Nations Working Group on Discrimination Against Women will be examining effective strategies to strengthen the role and accountability of men in driving change to achieve gender equality, including ending violence against women and girls. Against this background, this project will involve exploring ‘what works’ to build men’s engagement and accountability for ending violence against women and girls, focusing on insights from research and case studies of promising practices from across the globe and highlighting leading practice examples.

Project Supervisor: Maria Amigo - maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

EY – Reframe our Future

The global pandemic has accelerated the pace of change, from fast-tracking the adoption and use of technology and new ways of working, to the need to pivot quickly to keep up with changing markets and consumer expectations. The new landscape forces reinvention, and at EY, we see transformation as evermore critical to long-term value creation. So, how can an organisation reframe its future? Where are the as-yet-unseen opportunities that will generate future growth? How can an organisation rebuild and operate, not for business as usual, but for business that builds a better working world? In this project, students will explore how to transform the future of an organisation or sector, such as education, government, transport, health, and retail through the power of people, technology and innovation. Students will identify an untapped human need as a result of the pandemic and design and develop a proposed solution which creates long-term value for all stakeholders.

Project supervisor: Bruce Chapman - bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

IBM - Artificial Intelligence and Ethics in Law and Order

There have been significant advancements in technologies that support law and order activities. Including advanced facial recognition, DNA analytics, and the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence in the identification of crimes and their perpetrators. This rise in the use of artificial intelligence has the power to rapidly identify a potential criminal and bring them to justice. For law enforcement agencies, this is an incredible opportunity to solve crimes and get criminals off the street quickly. For civil libertarians, this technology has risk of invading individual privacy and rights, and potentially make significant errors through bias. In this project, students will explore the question of -should law enforcement rely on artificial intelligence to identify suspects to develop a case against them? Students should consider the balance of the needs of the community, versus the rights of the individual, the impact of bias on analysis and decision-making and what is needed in regulation and education to address the counter side’s concerns.

Project Supervisor: Abe Bakar - abe.bakar@sydney.edu.au

NewsCorp - The Ecology of Trust

The internet was born with the vision of becoming a platform for diverse views that expands global knowledge. While this has happened to some extent, we have also seen the detrimental impact of echo chambers and fake news. In an age of deep fakes and growing consumer distrust, how might we create a trusted source of news and entertainment that truly delivers on this promise of balance and truth. In this project, you will explore how trust is created and built. This may include defining the role of the storyteller - from trusted authorities to familiar fellow citizens. Are echo chambers inevitable or are there ways for people to escape them? How will we be able to tell fact from conspiracy fiction in the future? What role might technology play, and what will be the enduring roles of people and brands in the creation, formatting, and distribution of content? You are encouraged to create a perspective that is future-proof but grounded in customer insights, with a clear view as to how the content creators of the future will operate in order to build loyalty through trust.

Project Supervisor: Geoffrey Harrison - geoffrey.harrison@sydney.edu.au

NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment – Futureproofing for NSW

The NSW Government provides a range of essential services and as at June 2020, owns and manages around $365 billion in physical assets. This includes Crown lands, social housing, National Parks, as well as major infrastructure such as roads and railway lines. These assets and service delivery responsibilities are exposed to damage and disruption from climate risks such as flooding, bushfires, and extreme temperatures. The impact of these vulnerabilities is magnified for communities experiencing chronic stressors including inequality, as well as challenges to accessing housing and a diversity of jobs. The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment is responsible for land use planning policies in this complex context, tasked with managing these challenges but also harnessing opportunities to drive positive change for communities, the environment, and our future. However, what are the key opportunities to leverage State resources for sustainable outcomes? How can government ensure that resilience and adaptation planning is inclusive and participatory, particularly for sections of the community who are more vulnerable to climate change impacts? In this project, interdisciplinary groups will develop strategies to futureproof the built environment, protect NSW assets and support communities’ capacity to respond and adapt to shocks and stressors.

Project Supervisor: Elisabeth Valiente-Riedl - elisabeth.valiente-riedl@sydney.edu.au

NSW Treasury Corporation (TCorp) – Reimagining Social Housing

Demand for social housing is on the rise. An increasingly unaffordable rental market, growing homelessness, and fewer social housing vacancies have driven growth in the social housing waiting list, which has now reached 60,000 households. In 2016, the NSW Government launched ‘Future Directions’ for Social Housing in NSW, a 10-year strategy to transform the social housing system in the State. However, what is the best way to achieve the government’s vision for social housing transformation? Social housing is a complex problem that sits at the intersection of numerous factors and stakeholder interests. A unique opportunity exists to optimise the roll-out of Future Directions through interdisciplinary research to develop innovative, sustainable, ethical, financially viable and client-focused social housing models. Students could explore the social housing planning and consultation process, design fit for purpose social housing infrastructure, or research solutions that ensure a healthy and social environment for tenants.

Project supervisor: Helena Robinson – helena.robinson@sydney.edu.au

PTW Architects - Building for a Sustainable Future

Our world is changing. Much of our built environment was created to suit other times and is now in need of renewal. We have an opportunity to adapt existing, underutilised environments to suit current needs. How do we make the most of the opportunity to reinvent the places and spaces in which we live, work, transact and socialise, in ways that respond to contemporary human needs, but are also sustainable? This project invites students to find areas ripe for change - empty car parks, abandoned office buildings, redundant industrial areas, disused land and propose how these environments can be transformed to contribute to the sustainable cities of the future. Working in groups to leverage your diverse perspectives, you may choose to explore local, regional or global shifts in urban living, working to understand the different needs of the stakeholders (community groups, governments, businesses, etc.) that shape the evolving needs of the city. Collaborating in interdisciplinary groups students can Building for a Sustainable Future identify the most pressing environmental challenges in an urban context, or consider technological advancements that bring us closer to harmonious solutions for a sustainable future.

Project supervisor: Helena Robinson – helena.robinson@sydney.edu.au

TATA India - Sustainable Investing in Advanced Material Start-ups

Focusing on Innovation, Technology, Sustainability and People, Tata Steel strives to be a global steel industry leader for value creation, sustainability and corporate social responsibility. Tata Steel is looking to enter into the space of corporate venture capital, exploring opportunities beyond steel in advanced materials and sustainability - including decarbonisation, green hydrogen and reducing water consumption. In this project, students will work in interdisciplinary groups to look into how TATA Steel can make a definitive step towards embedding sustainability and circular economy principles in their operations through corporate venture capital. Students will look into opportunities for how TATA could invest in start-ups in this space and develop a set of decision making criteria for investments that include environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues. At the end of semester, students will have the opportunity to present to senior members from TATA Steel and provide recommendations on how to approach investments in sustainability start-ups.

Project Supervisor: Sonia Khosa - sonia.khosa@sydney.edu.au

Universities Admissions Centre - Reimagining University Admissions for Wider Access to Higher Education

Currently university admission is predominantly a numbers game and the personal attributes of an applicant – critical thinking, digital literacy, problem solving etc. are generally inferred from academic qualifications rather than specifically assessed as part of admissions. However, there is now a strong push for universities to admit students on broader criteria, while still ensuring that students are well prepared academically for university study. In this project, students may wish to consider how the current ATAR-based admission system works and how the key characteristics and attributes can be improved. Exploration of alternative models and frameworks used in other countries may be useful in determining the aspects of the current system that are worth retaining. Students are encouraged to propose new models including whether any new technologies can be leveraged to improve outcomes. Students must consider the implications of any recommended changes to the equitable allocation of university places, ensuring no group is significantly advantaged or disadvantaged.

Project Supervisor: Jinqi Xu – jinqi.xu@sydney.edu.au

Veolia - Reimaging Australia’s Circular Economy

In today’s society when we buy a product, we pay for the material, manufacturing, transport and marketing costs of that product. We pay for everything, except the costs to recycle or dispose of that product, including the associated carbon emissions. The collection and treatment of your product’s waste is not paid by you, but by the community through their taxes. The problem with this model is that there is no direct relationship between the manufacturer, the consumer, and the authority responsible for product disposal. Without these relationship silos being addressed, it will be challenging to have an efficient and effective circular system. Creating a true circular economy means involving the entire supply chain, throughout every stage of the product lifecycle. In this project, Veolia is interested in understanding “how Australia can reduce the environmental impact of packaging over the entire packaging lifecycle”. Specifically, how could a "Pay On Purchase System (POPS)" encourage better designed products, secure end markets for recycled materials and help to reduce our reliance on virgin materials? Would the costs to dispose be any different? Can we solve the packaging crisis if we were too simply POP!

Project supervisor: Bruce Chapman - bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

Westpac - Using Digital Technologies to Improve User Experience

Westpac is Australia’s oldest bank and company, they provide a broad range of banking and financial services. Westpac is focused on helping Australians succeed, ensuring customers can save and invest with confidence, to helping with the financial needs of small businesses, multi-national corporates, institutional and government clients, Westpac puts customers at the centre of everything they do. Westpac want to ensure the experiences for their customers and staff are quick and effortless, using technology to improve productivity, whilst focussing on user experience. In this project you will work in mixed disciplinary groups to explore solutions that take advantage of ways in which digital technologies can be used to deliver superior personalised services for customers or staff, to help put customers in control of their finances and to better understand and anticipate customer or staff needs. At the end of the project, you will pitch an innovative idea to help Westpac improve productivity or the experience of customers or staff in their branches, contact centres, corporate offices or in digital channels.

Project Supervisor: Maria Amigo - maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

ANZ - Data Privacy and Ethical Design

The impacts of data are enormous, delivering recommendations about what to watch on television, suggestions about what to study, insights into our health and wellbeing, and information about tailored product offerings. Yet these innovations, which can vastly improve our quality of life, present challenges and invite moral deliberation. In some cases, innovations cause unintended harm, violate informational privacy or result in discrimination. Long after Forbes declared that privacy was “completely and utterly dead”, citizens, including corporate citizens like ANZ, have privacy and the ethical uses of data front of mind. In this project, your group will examine principles of data ethics and use these to develop an innovative strategy or banking solution that has the potential to do good. As part of achieving this goal, interdisciplinary teams can examine how ANZ can implement a data strategy that will mitigate the risk of unintended harm, increase freedom of choice and equity, and preserve individual rights.

Project supervisor: Laura Kotevska - laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

Cochlear - Improving Access to Healthcare Using Digital Technologies

As the market leader in implantable hearing solutions, Cochlear is constantly looking for new ways to evolve the hearing care delivery model and make it easier for people with hearing loss to access our technology and get the best possible outcome once they receive an implantable hearing solution. Connected Care is a long-term initiative at Cochlear that aims to use software, mobile apps and other digital health tools to transform the care delivery model for cochlear implants and bone anchored hearing aids. In this project, students will explore the likely future trends of telemedicine and the impact of digital technology on the future access and delivery of healthcare. Cochlear is interested in working with groups of interdisciplinary student groups to explore the future of Connected Care and the potential implications for the Cochlear product and services pipeline.

Project supervisor: Bruce Chapman – bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

DIPEx International – Building a Post Covid New Normal

This project will be conducted fully online via Zoom.

The global Covid-19 pandemic continues to be fought on multiple frontiers. As well as the ongoing physical health impacts, we can anticipate enduring social, economic, political, and mental health impacts for generations to come. As a result of the pandemic, we have also seen innovation that we could have only dreamed about pre-Covid, from digital classrooms and workplaces to mass roll-out of tele and online health. As we begin to navigate ‘living with Covid’, ‘the prevalence of Long Covid’ and optimistically, a ‘post-Covid world’, how can we move from reactive to proactive planning and create interventions that support individuals, families, communities, and businesses to recover and look forward? DIPEx International (DI) is an international consortium of qualitative researchers who study patient experiences of health and illness. DI aims to provide World Health Organisation with recommendations regarding the individual, social, health and political aspects of building a post-Covid ‘new normal’. DI asks students to consider: How can we leverage lessons learned to be better prepared for the next pandemic? How can we manage ongoing media and communications around health behaviours? What are the lasting effects of the workplace? What physical and mental health factors should we consider as we recover from lockdowns, economic stress, and other effects of the pandemic?

Project supervisor: Jennifer Fletcher – jennifer.fletcher@sydney.edu.au

Elizabeth Broderick and Co - Putting Intersectionality at the Heart of Gender Equality

Gender equality strategies have typically treated women and girls as one monolithic group, often making the diverse experiences amongst women and girls invisible. There has also been the assumption that strategies targeted to women and girls will automatically benefit all women and girls. However, by assuming that all women and girls have the same experience, gender equality policies end up inadvertently benefitting more privileged women and girls and reinforcing intersectional inequalities. Too often ‘intersectionality’ becomes a last minute ‘add-on’ rather than integrated from the start. How can we design gender equality policies to be more responsive to intersectionality? How can we ensure they reach and benefit all women? The UN Working Group on Discrimination Against Women and Girls is examining effective approaches to embed intersectionality in policies to advance gender equality. Against this background, this project will involve exploring ‘what works’ to integrate an intersectional approach within gender equality policies across three domains: violence against women, women’s political participation and women’s economic empowerment. The project will draw on insights from research and case studies of promising practices from across the globe and highlight leading practice examples. Projects will make recommendations on actions that governments and other actors can take.

Project supervisor: Jessica Kean – jessica.kean@sydney.edu.au

EngageRM - Is Covid-19 a Full Time Whistle or a Time to Change Direction

Regular physical activity is a well-established protective factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes and some cancers. It is also associated with improved mental health and delayed onset of dementia. Despite the benefits of physical activity, it is estimated that 1 in 4 adults and 3 in 4 adolescents globally do not meet the WHO recommendations for physical activity. The direct health care costs associated with inactivity are estimated to be $54 billion per year. Covid has changed the way that society engages with physical activity. Organised sports activities have not been possible due to Covid related restrictions. This has resulted in a decline in physical activity levels. Many elite and competitive athletes have been unable to train and compete under covid restrictions. Some of these athletes choose to leave elite/professional sports. The skills and characteristics of these athletes are often underutilised post sporting career. Wearable fitness technology enables a more personalised engagement with physical activity including the way that data is shared over social media platforms. Wearable fitness technology provides opportunities to better understand potential customer needs. This project will explore the changing relationship between society and physical activity. Is there a need to fundamentally reset our relationship with physical activity?

Project supervisor: Bruce Chapman – bruce.chapman@sydney.edu.au

Ernst and Young and The University of Sydney – The Future of Higher Education

The University of Sydney is developing an ambitious 10-year strategy to become one of the world’s truly great universities. By the time we celebrate our 200th anniversary in 2050, we want our work to be more compelling, more impactful, and more important to society than at any other time in our history. As we look to 2032, what potential do you see in the digital technologies in enabling higher education experiences and how we come together as a university community? How might we respond to the increasing need for personalised experiences to improve individual learners’ outcomes and the desire for a shared university experience? How could the digital and the physical come together in our future campuses and our learning experiences? And what are the opportunities and challenges for diversity, inclusivity and creating a connection between learners and the University? In this project, we ask you to present options for what we might do over the next decade in response to these questions. You are encouraged to interrogate your recommendations from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, to ensure you are putting forward the most robust proposal.

Project supervisor: Fabian Held – fabian.held@sydney.edu.au

IBM - Artificial Intelligence and Ethics in Law and Order

There have been significant advancements in technologies that support law and order activities. Including advanced facial recognition, DNA analytics, and the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence in the identification of crimes and their perpetrators. This rise in the use of artificial intelligence has the power to rapidly identify a potential criminal and bring them to justice. For law enforcement agencies, this is an incredible opportunity to solve crimes and get criminals off the street quickly. For civil libertarians, this technology has risk of invading individual privacy and rights, and potentially make significant errors through bias. In this project, students will explore the question of should law enforcement rely on artificial intelligence to identify suspects to develop a case against them? Students should consider the balance of the needs of the community, versus the rights of the individual, the impact of bias on analysis and decision-making and what is needed in regulation and education to address the counter side’s concerns.

Project supervisor: Jinqi Xu – jinqi.xu@sydney.edu.au

Jacobs Engineering - Decarbonisation of the Transport Network

Amidst several pressing global challenges, the adverse impacts from climate change as per the latest findings from IPCC remain among the biggest threats faced by our planet. These issues have brought to the forefront an urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, through coordinated and decisive decarbonisation. Jacobs is working towards sustainable future transport networks in cities across the world. In this project, students will work in interdisciplinary groups to investigate how the transport sector can effectively contribute to decarbonisation, and how carbon emissions from different modes of public and private transport infrastructure can be decreased. Students will apply a broad approach thinking to social, financial, economic, and environmental benefits and barriers of decarbonisation commitments. In finalising their recommendations, students will consider a range of questions, such as: are alternative fuels such as hydrogen, or public transport and transport infrastructure upgrades across multiple regions a possible solution? Are policy changes needed to shift away from business-as-usual and adopt innovative ways of producing and consuming energy? And essentially, can the movement of people and goods be decarbonised?

Project supervisor: Sonia Khosa – sonia.khosa@sydney.edu.au

KPMG - Data Security and the Future of Privacy

Privacy is a fundamental human right, and yet each year Australians are faced with thousands of personal information data breaches whereby confidential or sensitive information is accessed or disclosed without authorisation, stolen or lost. The recent escalations of geopolitical tensions have heightened data security risks, as government, critical infrastructure, social media platforms, health services, banks, retailers and universities race to shore up defences. The world is changing, and how we interact is changing and evolving; the impacts of COVID-19 together with the acceleration of emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence and the growth of digital platforms threatens the individual’s right to privacy and raises fundamental questions about the appropriateness of the current privacy and cyber regulatory framework. While legal and regulatory uplifts are in motion, there is a struggle to keep pace with the rapid rate of change. At the same time there is a push to enable more access to and sharing of data. In this project, your group may look at the impact of emerging technologies on the privacy rights of business, consumers and other priority groups, or alternatively explore the current state of privacy law, policy or regulation to ascertain if they are fit for purpose in the rapidly changing world. Your interdisciplinary team should work together to advocate for a privacy framework that will stimulate the responsible collection, use and management of data in Australia, having regard to your chosen issue.

Project supervisor: Laura Kotevska - laura.kotevska@sydney.edu.au

Nib Health Insurance - Proactive Solutions for better Health Outcomes.

Traditionally, health insurers have been focused on providing financial protection in the event a member becomes sick or requires medical assistance, with expenses claimed post treatment. However, the value of proactive and preventative health is becoming increasingly more recognised by customers. Demand is shifting from the traditional model of reactively treating illness to proactively reduce the risk of illness in the future. At the same time, the wellness industry has exploded with the introduction of new and innovative solutions designed to improve health outcomes with methods outside of the traditional medical model. However, as a consequence the wellness and medical ecosystem has become fragmented, complex and confusing. In this project you will investigate the health ecosystem and develop creative and innovative ways to bring together services from the clinical, wellness and financial services industries to assist consumers make informed decisions about their health. You are asked to answer questions including: How can traditional health insurers become a partner for health? how do consumers know that the health services being delivered are scientifically proven? how can consumers trust their health partner to empower them to make informed decisions about their option? how does a traditional health insurer earn credibility in this space given the current perception? And ultimately, how can their health partners help them achieve improved health outcomes for life?

Project supervisor: Fabian Held – fabian.held@sydney.edu.au

Optus - How Digitisation is Reshaping Education in Australia

Australia’s higher and vocational education sectors have been a major economic driver for the past two decades and a symbol of this country’s evolution into a knowledge-intensive economy. As a result of the disruption felt by the sector in the last 24 months, institutions are now urgently reviewing their strategy and operations to identify short-term cost efficiencies and revenue generating opportunities. But the impact of COVID-19 is not simply restricted to finances. It has fundamentally changed traditional operating models and made areas such as remote learning and working not only viable, but potentially permanent. Student engagement and student experience has now become a strategic imperative for institutions. Much of the student engagement activity has tended to focus on the physical campus, including significant recent efforts to activate campuses and encourage social and peer-to-peer interactions among students. Institutions must now think beyond the physical environment and understand how digitisation, mobile applications and cloud services can create seamless, agile and outstanding experiences for both student, educators and employees. Digitisation presents an opportunity for our institutions to not only survive, but thrive in a new digital world where consumer expectations have never been greater.

Project supervisor: Elisabeth Valiente-Riedl - elisabeth.valiente-riedl@sydney.edu.au

Powerhouse Museum - Evolving the Powerhouse for a Changing World

The renewal of the Powerhouse marks a major shift in how Sydney thinks about itself, its culture, and its communities. The Powerhouse will establish a new paradigm for museums through the creation of an institution that is innately flexible. It will be a place designed to constantly evolve its collections, programs and spaces in response to the needs of its growing communities. How can we create cultural infrastructure that amplifies our voices, gives us space to sit with difficult conversations, and creates stories, places, and experiences so compelling that they force us to raise our eyes from the screen and step beyond our constraints even for a moment? This project challenges students to envisage a new museum that changes with the world, sustains its relevance and vitality, and claims its place as the centrepiece of a creative industry precinct.

Project supervisor: Helena Robinson – helena.robinson@sydney.edu.au

PTW Architects - Building for a Sustainable Future

Our world is changing. Much of our built environment was created to suit other times and is now in need of renewal. We have an opportunity to adapt existing, underutilised environments to suit current needs. How do we make the most of the opportunity to reinvent the places and spaces in which we live, work, transact and socialise, in ways that respond to contemporary human needs, but are also sustainable? This project invites students to find areas ripe for change - empty car parks, abandoned office buildings, redundant industrial areas, disused land - and propose how these environments can be transformed to contribute to sustainable cities of the future. Working in groups to leverage your diverse perspectives, you may choose to explore local, regional, or global shifts in urban living, working to understand the different needs of the stakeholders (community groups, governments, businesses, etc.) that shape the evolving needs of the city. Collaborating in interdisciplinary groups students can identify the most pressing environmental challenges in an urban context or consider technological advancements that bring us closer to harmonious solutions for a sustainable future.

Project supervisor: Maria Amigo – maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

Randstad - Humanising AI in the Recruitment Process

AI and technology, in general, have the potential to deliver tremendous benefits, as well as new challenges for the recruitment sector. As a global leader in HR services, we invest in combining the power of today’s technology with our passion for people. Today, investment in, development, and use of AI has skyrocketed and enabled automation of many steps in our recruitment activities. In this post-covid era employers are desperately trying to keep their people, whilst also doing anything they can to attract new staff. The questions you will explore in this project are how can automation provide a more human experience in the workplace? How can AI or machine learning improve our clients and job seekers experience? How can we use technology to attract and retain talent? How can corporate Australia utilise disruptive technology to provide more agile career paths for their employers and break the mold of the traditional corporate ladder?

Project supervisor: Helena Robinson – helena.robinson@sydney.edu.au

The University of Sydney - Ethical and Sustainable Impact through Supply Chains

What we buy makes a difference. From reducing modern slavery and plastic waste to supporting Indigenous enterprises, the goods and services we purchase, and how we chose to do so, have an important role to reduce human rights and environmental harms. Our buying behaviours and decision can promote economic participation and employment in local communities and under-represented areas of the economy. In response to the world’s challenges and increasing community expectations, organisations are beginning to prioritise people, planet and purpose in their supply chains. The University is no different. Every year, the University spends hundreds of millions of dollars in purchasing a myriad of goods and services, and partners with thousands of suppliers to support our teaching, research and operations. The University’s Procurement team has an important opportunity to continue to transform our purchasing power for good – across modern slavery, Indigenous procurement and sustainability. Your project is to create a strategy to drive behavioural change amongst our students, staff and suppliers. How do organisations translate values into actual impact? How do we inspire staff and students to buy ethically, sustainably and support Indigenous enterprises? How do we partner with our suppliers to educate them about Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) expectations?

Project supervisor: Maria Amigo – maria.amigo@sydney.edu.au

Universities Admissions Centre - Reimagining University Admissions for Wider Access to Higher Education

Currently university admission is predominantly a numbers game and the personal attributes of an applicant, critical thinking, digital literacy, problem solving etc., are generally inferred from academic qualifications rather than specifically assessed as part of admissions. However, there is now a strong push for universities to admit students on broader criteria, while still ensuring that students are well prepared academically for university study. In this project, students may wish to consider how the current ATAR-based admission system works and how the key characteristics and attributes can be improved. Exploration of alternative models and frameworks used in other countries may be useful in determining the aspects of the current system that are worth retaining. Students are encouraged to propose new models including whether any new technologies can be leveraged to improve outcomes. Students must consider the implications of any recommended changes to the equitable allocation of university places, ensuring no group is significantly advantaged or disadvantaged.

Project supervisor: Jinqi Xu – jinqi.xu@sydney.edu.au

Westpac - Using Digital Technologies to Improve User Experience

Westpac is Australia’s oldest bank and company; they provide a broad range of banking and financial services. Westpac is focused on helping Australians succeed, ensuring customers can save and invest with confidence. Helping with the financial needs of small businesses, multi-national corporates, institutional and government clients, Westpac puts customers at the centre of everything they do. Westpac want to ensure the experiences for their customers and staff are quick and effortless, using technology to improve productivity, whilst focussing on user experience. In this project you will work in mixed disciplinary groups to explore solutions that take advantage of ways in which digital technologies can be used to deliver superior personalised services for customers or staff, to help put customers in control of their finances and to better understand and anticipate customer or staff needs. At the end of the project, you will pitch an innovative idea to help Westpac improve productivity or the experience of customers or staff in their branches, contact centres, corporate offices or in digital channels.

Project supervisor: Sonia Khosa – sonia.khosa@sydney.edu.au

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Last updated: 08 August 2022

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