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Industry and community projects

3000 level - projects and partners

The following projects are 3000 level units. If you’re studying in a Bachelor of Advanced Studies, see information on our 4000 level projects.

Because industry and community projects are run in collaboration with partners outside of the University, project partners and topics are subject to change prior to the start of teaching.

If you have any questions about the projects, you can email pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au or the project supervisor listed in each project. 

Availability of projects

Places in each project are limited so we encourage you to register early in Sydney Student to avoid missing out.

You will only see projects that are available for your enrolled shell unit and still have places available. If you can’t see a project when you register, you will need to select a different project. Project availability is subject to change.

Intensives

Intensives are full-time equivalent offerings, and the exact timing of each day is outlined in the intensive timetable below. Students are expected to attend the scheduled class times for the relevant session.

If you have any questions, please contact pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au.

February intensives take place over 4 weeks from 22 January to 18 February 2024. Timetable is shown below. 

July intensives take place over 4 weeks from 24 June to 21 July 2024. Timetable is shown below.

October intensives take place over 6 weeks from 16 September to Friday 27 October 2024. Timetable details to be released in August 2024.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Timetable

February intensive projects take place over 4 weeks from 22 January till 16 February 2024.

There will only be one class per project. Please consider the project timetable before registering for a project in Sydney Student and make sure that you are available for the allocated class times.

Projects will be delivered face-to-face on campus. 

It will take 7-9 days for your personal timetable to reflect your project registration.

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Week 1 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm No class
Week 2 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm No class 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm
Week 3 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm
Week 4 No class No class No class No class No class

Students are expected to contribute a total of 120 – 150 hours of effort towards the intensive unit which includes 40 hours of scheduled classes plus an additional 79 – 109 hours (20 - 27 hours per week) outside of class times, including significant independent groupwork as indicated.

Consent Labs – LGBTQIA+ Consent Awareness in Schools

Please note that this project deals with the topic of sexual and gender-based violence. Due to the sensitive nature of this topic some students may find the content in this project to be triggering. If you feel as though you may be triggered by this project, we encourage you to enrol into another one of our projects.

Consent Labs is a youth-led not-for-profit organisation providing holistic sexual, respectful relationships and consent education for young people and their communities. Sexuality or gender diverse (LGBTQIA+) young people make up more than 20% of school populations, and currently experience substantially poorer outcomes in school belonging, feelings of social safety and academic performance. School communities (including peers, teachers and parents/carers) face personal biases and have varying levels of understanding of complex factors such as minority stress, cisnormativity, heteronormativity and transphobia/homophobia; these factors can cause LGBTQIA+ people to be vulnerable to higher rates of violence. Research has demonstrated that teachers feel unsupported, ill-equipped and fearful to discuss gender and sexuality at school, or to intervene when sexual or gender-based violence takes place. Consent Labs is seeking to bridge this gap by creating innovative and engaging workshops and digital resources that prevent sexuality and gender-based violence in high school aged young people. In this project, you will explore these key issues, and deliver insights and recommendations which will contribute to the co-design of our new workshops and resources.  

Meat and Livestock Australia – Market Growth and Sustainability in the Meat and Livestock Industry

Meat and Livestock Australia’s (MLA) purpose is to foster the long-term prosperity of the Australian red meat and livestock industry by investing in research and marketing activities. Currently, MLA is facing some exciting communication and research challenges and is inviting interdisciplinary student groups to explore topics including growth in niche markets and encouraging sustainability practices amongst producers.

With the movement of people becoming more common globally, niche markets have arisen internationally and domestically. One emerging market segmentation is the halal market. Looking at the next 5 – 10 years, how can the Australian red meat industry communicate, market and supply to these different groups to best capture the growth in halal consumers? Which of these market segments should be prioritised and should they be communicated with differently depending on location and the maturation of the market?

Another challenge within the beef industry is that research indicates that a large proportion of producers exhibit a level of resistance to changing on-farm sustainability practices. Engaging with this resistance to encourage practice change is crucial to enable the industry to demonstrate sustainable action to the public and to meet targets such as CN30. Students are encouraged to develop a series of recommendations for future communications and engagement efforts based on social science and sustainability research.

The University of Sydney – Reimagining Tertiary Education for Graduate Success

New disruptors, such as AI, the gig-economy, automation, and remote working, are creating an increasingly complex and rapidly evolving work landscape. Universities play an integral role in equipping graduates with the skills and knowledge they need to be job ready. However, the range of skills required across diverse career paths and the constantly evolving expectations of industry mean that how universities can best equip students is a complex question. In this project, students critically investigate the fourth year of undergraduate study and consider how it can best meet graduate and employer needs. In interdisciplinary teams, students are encouraged to embrace 'blue-sky' thinking explore and re-imagine a purposeful transition from classroom to career.

In this project students will also have the opportunity to collaborative with and hear from industry experts from Affirmative recruitment, who will provide insight into changing trends in the workforce and various elements that recruiters and companies are looking for in recent graduates.

Timetable

July intensive projects take place over 4 weeks from 24 June till 21 July 2024. 

There will only be one class per project. Please consider the project timetable before registering for a project and make sure that you are available for the allocated class times.

All projects are delivered face-to-face on campus unless otherwise stated, please check project descriptions for details.

It will take 7 - 9 days for your personal timetable to reflect your project registration. 

  Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
Week 1 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm
Week 2 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm Independent study 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm
Week 3 10 am - 1 pm 10 am - 4 pm Independent study 10 am - 4 pm 10 am - 4 pm
Week 4 Independent study Independent study Independent study Independent study Independent study

Students are expected to contribute a total of 120 - 150 hours of effort towards the intensive unit, which includes 41 hours of scheduled classes plus an additional 79 - 109 hours (20 - 27 hours per week) outside of class times. This will include group meetings scheduled outside class hours and independent research. 

Rotary International - The Next Generation of Service 

Rotary International is a global humanitarian organisation that was founded in 1905. With over 1.4 million members in over 200 countries, the organisation aims to promote peace, fight disease, provide clean water, save mothers and children, support education, and grow local economies. Rotary International is a global organisation with members from a diverse range of backgrounds and demographics. However, the majority of its members are typically middle-aged or older professionals, such as business owners, executives, and managers. This is partly because Rotary has a long history and was originally established as a networking and service organisation for business leaders. However, Rotary is now working to attract a more diverse range of members, including younger people, women, and individuals from different cultures and backgrounds. In recent years, Rotary has made efforts to expand its reach and increase the diversity of its membership by implementing programs and initiatives designed to engage younger generations and promote inclusiveness. Despite these efforts, the demographic makeup of Rotary International's membership is still largely determined by its historical roots. Rotary is looking for solutions to broaden its demographics and include more young people. These solutions would need to focus on youth-led initiatives and leverage the power of social media to develop projects that engage, empower and encourage more individuals from diverse backgrounds, including younger people, to become involved and to make positive and sustainable change.  

SAGE - Engaging men as equal partners in achieving equity in science higher education in Australia

Please note this project is only available to students who are enrolled in units of study from Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM). 

The Australian higher education and research sector plays a vital role in driving innovation and societal progress. However, deeply rooted barriers hinder the participation of women and marginalised groups in research careers, limiting the sector's potential by restricting the diversity of ideas, knowledge, and perspectives. Science in Australia Gender Equity (SAGE) supports this journey through the internationally recognised Athena Swan Charter accreditation program, which offers a framework to identify and address disparities in the education workforce.  One notable challenge facing SAGE is the observed lack of male involvement in Gender Equity and Inclusion (GEDI) initiatives. Consequently, women and people from marginalised groups primarily bear the responsibility for driving progress in this vital area. The question arises: How can we effectively engage men as equal partners in co-designing and implementing GEDI interventions within the Australian higher education and research sector? Your task is to propose professional, sensitive, and inclusive solutions, ideas, and strategies to address the lack of male involvement in GEDI initiatives. Consider approaches that foster genuine collaboration and partnership between men, women and marginalised groups in designing and implementing GEDI interventions. Proposals should aim to elevate male engagement beyond mere allyship, fostering authentic collaboration. Proposals should be feasible while demonstrating creativity, innovation, and sensitivity to the diverse needs of the stakeholders involved.  

JLL Australia - Shaping Tomorrow for Sustainable Cities 

JLL helps buy, build, occupy and invest in a variety of assets including industrial, commercial, retail, residential and hotel real estate. From tech startups to global firms, our clients span industries including banking, energy, healthcare, law, life sciences, manufacturing, and technology. We see the built environment as a powerful medium with which to change the world for the better. By combining innovative technology and data intelligence with our world-renowned expertise, we’re able to unveil untapped opportunities for success. The past few years have seen the biggest disruptors to cities, in how we live in them and use them.  Whilst a time of rapid change can be unsettling it can also be seen as an opportunity to shape the future. In this project student are required to look at how we can shape our cities to be more sustainable- environmentally, socially, and commercially. We will consider potential partnerships in driving progress, to pool resources and capability. JLL will present some considerations and case studies for making cities more environmentally and socially sustainable, clever repurposing of buildings and precincts, and examples of social enterprise where there is money to be made from being socially and environmentally sustainable.

Enfold (India) - Promoting Global Accessibility to Sexuality Education

Please note that this project deals with the topic of sexuality and gender identity. Due to the sensitive nature of this topic some students may find the content in this project to be triggering. If you feel as though you may be triggered by this project, we encourage you to enrol into another one of our projects. 

There is a clear global need for gender equity, sexuality, and personal safety education. The UN recognises that effective education on these issues is key to the prevention of gender based and sexual violence against children and adults and to a future of gender sensitivity and gender equity. While there are organisations doing effective work on these issues in many national contexts, programs looking to expand their reach can face cultural, religious, linguistic, and policy barriers. In this project, students are invited to work with Enfold – an organisation working to address sexual violence in India through education, rehabilitation, restorative practices and research – to develop strategies for ensuring young people around the world have access to stigma-free sexuality education that is culturally relevant, restorative, and non-alienating. Students will research how sexual education would need to be adapted to meet the needs of people in different cultural contexts. How can organisations navigate local policy and legislation, educational and healthcare systems, and community and religious attitudes while ensuring that the offering remains comprehensive and inclusive. Students will be invited to: tailor content and interventions that is inclusive of diversity in sexual orientations, gender identities with an intersectional lens; identify innovative and effective mediums for learning and discussing sensitive topics; identify any significant barriers to the translation of existing programs to new contexts and suggest recommendation to implementComprehensive sexual education and personal safety education. 

Little Scientists - Fixing the Learning Gap Through Early STEM Education in Australia

Please note this project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001. 

Little Scientists is Australia’s only dedicated provider of STEM professional development (PD) to the Early Childhood Education and Care sector. There is very low awareness of early STEM education in Australia and public policy is yet to catch up with scientific consensus recognising STEM education as critical to early childhood development. Both government and non-government interventions to improve students’ participation and success in STEM have focused almost exclusively on tertiary, secondary, and (now increasingly) primary levels of education. However, these efforts are on quicksand without investment in early childhood as the first — and arguably most influential — stage of the STEM learning pipeline. The stark reality is that children in Australia have very limited and inequitable access to evidence-based early STEM education. This is because:  

Educators receive very little STEM teaching training as part of their TAFE and university pre-service qualifications. 

Educators are not supported to prioritise early STEM teaching professional development  once they start working in the field.  

Educators and services who do seek STEM professional development are strongly concentrated in the most affluent suburbs of major cities. 

In this project, teams are asked to analyse and develop strategies to address how Little Scientists can increase investment in, prioritisation of, and access to early STEM professional development at the state and territory government level. 

DBG Health - Crafting a Diverse and Inclusive Culture at DBG Health

DBG Health, a dynamic player in the health, wellness, and beauty industry, was established in 2023 and is headquartered in Melbourne, Australia. Operating globally, DBG Health distributes more than 150 million packages of affordable health, wellness, and beauty products annually. At the core of its success lies VidaCorp, an integral division of DBG Health, leading the way in over-the-counter medications, wellness offerings, personal care, and beauty items. VidaCorp prides itself on its extensive collection of consumer brands, each designed to meet diverse consumer needs across a range of therapeutic categories. In line with its commitment to excellence, DBG Health strives to be an employer of choice, prioritizing the well-being of its employees and fostering their talents. Recognizing the importance of diversity and inclusion, DBG Health seeks to promote its brand values effectively to attract and engage a diverse workforce. Through interdisciplinary collaboration, students will explore innovative strategies to enhance DBG Health's employer branding, with a focus on attracting and retaining diverse and inclusive talent.  

ARE Media - The Use of Generative AI to Help Scale E-commerce Content and Revenue 

The project focuses on leveraging generative AI for scaling e-commerce content creation while mitigating potential penalties from Google's algorithm changes, addressing the complex challenge faced by Are Media, Australia's leading content company, in transitioning to an omnichannel media entity with robust content commerce capabilities. Teams will explore interdisciplinary solutions to ensure scalability of shopping content creation, prepare for evolving search and online shopping trends, and develop staff skills in AI tools. Through a transdisciplinary approach, research will encompass consumer engagement, online transactions, technology adaptation, and fostering innovation. Additionally, scenario planning will be employed to anticipate future industry shifts and their implications.   

This project aims to integrate interdisciplinary perspectives and methods, as well as stakeholder knowledge and values, to address the complex and real-world problem of finding better ways of using generative AI for shopping content creation to increase our affiliate revenue. Students are required to devise innovative strategies to propel Are Media's transformation journey in the dynamic media landscape, fostering open-mindedness, curiosity, and adaptability among staff while aligning with the company's five-year strategy for success.  

October intensive projects take place over 6 weeks from 16 September till 27 October 2024.

There will only be one class per project. Please consider the project timetable before registering for a project in Sydney Student and make sure that you are available for the allocated class times.

Projects will be delivered as either online or face-to-face on campus and have a 90% attendance requirement.

You will be manually added to the project timetable and it will take 7-9 days for your personal timetable to reflect your project registration.

Students are expected to contribute a total of 120 – 150 hours of effort towards the intensive unit, which includes 41 hours of scheduled classes plus an additional 79 – 109 hours (20 - 27 hours per week) outside of class times. This will include group meetings scheduled outside class hours and independent research.

October Intensives timetable and projects to be released August 2024. 

In 2024 we will be delivering ICPU global programs in: 

  • Padova, Italy in partnership with Padova University

This project is a collaborative project organized by three internationally renowned Universities, i.e. the University of Padua (Italy), the University of Sydney (Australia) and the University of Lausanne (Switzerland). This year’s edition will be hosted by the University of Padua. The project class will be made up of a mix of students from the three above mentioned universities (up to 75 students, 25 from each university). External partners (industries, community-organizations, other stakeholders) will also be involved throughout the project.

  • Rethinking food systems for better health and sustainability

Food is central to family, cultural and community identity. It is essential to sustain life and food-related activities, provide income and livelihoods for billions of people on earth. With the continuing rise in global food production and manufacturing to meet increasing demand and the additional impact on ecosystems and climate, there is a pressing need to rethink our food systems. In this project, student teams representing unique mixes of disciplines will explore questions such as: How can we transform food systems so it can meet the changing needs of consumers in a more sustainable way? What role can consumers, producers, manufacturers, industry leaders and government play to achieve ambitious targets? How can we rewrite the narrative of food production and supply to reflect a progressive industry that will engage a diverse future workforce and facilitate a more comprehensive approach to solving complex issues within the sector? Through collaborative research into these areas, students will provide solutions on how we can rethink food systems for better health and sustainability.

Global Intensives are run during the July Intensive session over a 4-week period. Students will spend 2-3 weeks in-country working in a collaborative learning space where you’ll have the opportunity to engage directly with industry partners and take part in relevant site visits and excursions. In the final week of the intensive students are expected to conduct independent study where you'll write up your final assessments through self-directed learning as advised by your project supervisor.

Applications for our 2024 Global ICPUs have now closed. Keep an eye on this webpage for information on our 2025 Global ICPUs from November 2025.

Semester-long projects

Semester 1 projects will commence 22 February 2024. Semester 2 projects will commence 29 July 2024. 

Students are expected to attend scheduled class times for 3 hours per week.

2024 semester-long projects will be delivered face-to-face on campus.

In both semester sessions we will be running Science intradisciplinary projects. These projects are only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001. 

If you have any questions, please contact pvceducation.enquiries@sydney.edu.au.

Find out how to enrol in an ICPU.

Timetable

Industry partner and project Timetable
ACON
Improving Health and Wellbeing Outcomes for LGBTQIA Peoples in Western Sydney 
Thursday 9 am - 12 pm
Australian Broadcasting Corporation
Levelling the Playing Field and Increasing Diversity in Sports Media
Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
Shaping a Greener Future Through Science with Impact*

Friday 9 am - 12 pm 
Australian Science Communicators 
Rethinking Approaches to Science Communication*
Tuesday 3 - 6 pm
Ernst and Young Australia and The University of Sydney
Reimagining Campus Food and Retail Culture 
Friday 9 am - 12 pm
Freedom Solutions 
Clever Solutions Made for Freedom
Friday 1 - 4 pm
Girringun Aboriginal Corporation
Listening to Aboriginal Community Voices
Monday 4 - 7 pm
nandin Innovation Centre
Startup Challenges  

Friday 9 am - 12 pm

National Rugby League
Diversifying and Growing NRL Participation in Underrepresented Market

Monday 2 - 5 pm

NSW Department of Education  
The Ethical use of AI in Early Childhood Education
Monday 9 am - 12 pm
Paratus Clinical
Changing Public Attitudes Surrounding Vaccinations
Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
Powerhouse Museum
Creative Industries Collaboration
Tuesday 12 - 3 pm
PTW Architects
Building for a Sustainable Future
Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm
Rotary International
The Next Generation of Service 
Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm
Settlement Services International
Enhancing Volunteer Experiences

Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

TATA India
Crafting the Future of Retail Innovation  
Wednesday 3 - 6 pm
TerraCycle
Increasing Efficiencies Across Recycling Supply Chains

Monday 12 - 3 pm

The Infants Home 
Valuing Early Childhood Educators
Wednesday 12 - 3 pm
Universities Admissions Centre
Reimagining University Admissions for Wider Access to Higher Education
Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm 
Westpac Banking Corporation
Using Digital Technologies to Improve User Experiences
Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

* SPCU students can enrol into all available projects. This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001. 

ACON – Improving Health and Wellbeing Outcomes for LGBTQIA Peoples in Western Sydney

Greater Western Sydney (GWS) is one of the most culturally, ethnically and linguistically diverse, and economically disadvantaged, regions in Australia. Research has demonstrated that LGBTQ+ people living in GWS face disproportionate levels of psychological and physical health issues compared to the broader Australian population. Rates of psychological distress and HIV notifications are of particular concern. We know discrimination and exclusion have negative impacts on health and wellbeing, and this is compounded by intersecting experiences of marginalisation. In this project, students will generate recommendations for effective health and/or policy interventions for LGBTQ+ people living in Greater Western Sydney. This project could be of interest to students with knowledge or interest in: health promotion, community development, policy, public health, cultural difference, diversity and inclusion, or LGBTQ+ histories, experiences and politics.

Timetable: Thursday 9 am - 12 pm

Australian Broadcasting Corporation – Levelling the Playing Field and Increasing Diversity in Sports Media

There are persistent and significant inequalities in sports reporting in Australia. Despite the recent explosion of interest in The Matildas, mainstream media coverage of women’s sport is still dwarfed by men’s sport. There are also inequalities in production: more men are featured as interviewees/experts across all sports coverage, and most journalists working in sports media are men. There is also troubling under-representation of people with disability, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds (CALD), and Indigenous Australians. ABC Sport’s 50:50 Equality Project wants to achieve equal representation of women and non-binary people’s voices in our stories, and equal coverage of women’s and men’s sport across all platforms (video, audio, social media, text). We also want coverage and a workforce which reflects the diversity of the Australian population, while ensuring we reach a audiences who might not have previously engaged in traditional sports media. In this project, students will be asked to explore the drivers of this persistent inequality and come up with recommendations for practical change.

Students will have the choice, in conjunction with their assigned group, to preference either an online or in-person final group presentation, with a final determination to be made by the Academic Supervisor

Timetable: Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation – Shaping a Greener Future Through Science with Impact

This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001. 

The Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) is the home of Australia’s most significant landmark and national infrastructure for research. Thousands of scientists from industry and academia benefit from gaining access to state-of-the-art instruments every year. Currently ANSTO are facing some exciting public education and research challenges and are inviting interdisciplinary student groups to explore the following topics. 

ANSTO has a leading role in assessing and characterizing fine particles, specifically PM2.5, across various locations in Australia and globally. PM2.5 particles are invisible to the human eye but can significantly impair visibility. Despite being a health hazard, current air quality guidelines focus solely on mass concentration, disregarding the particles' elemental composition and sources. A prevailing perception issue in Australia regards seemingly "natural" sources of pollution as harmless, necessitating an exploration of public awareness and perceptions. In this project students are asked to focus on areas such as public awareness, education of various particle pollution types, and leverage technologies like elemental analysis for informed pollution mitigation strategies. This holistic approach aims to foster public understanding and promote a cleaner, safer environment.

The food industry is seeking to phase out PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances), a group of over 4000 synthetic compounds extensively used in fibre-based food contact packaging. By removing PFAS contamination, it will help to improve the sustainability of Australian packaging and the quality of recycling and composting streams. The challenge lies in how this will be done. This project invites students to explore innovative ways to break down and communicate the complex chemistry of PFAS into something understandable for both non-scientific industry representatives and the general public with the aim to generate awareness of the PFAS problem. Students will look to explore key questions including understanding industries currently using PFAS, their strategies, communicating potential dangers, creating a business case for testing and alternative packaging, and raising public awareness through successful campaigns akin to those addressing CFCs and single-use plastics. 

Timetable: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Australian Science Communicators – Rethinking Approaches to Science Communication

This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001. Please note that for this project our industry partners are not based in Sydney, so partners will engage with students virtually.  

Effective science engagement is crucial for guiding society toward a sustainable future. Traditional approaches like 'science-in-the-pub’ events and scientists engaging with the media have their place, but there is an ever-present need to go beyond these science-popularism outputs. A significant gap exists between scientists, policymakers and the public, in part due to the underutilisation of expert science communication practitioners and researchers. These experts are key in shaping effective public engagement that’s proven to work, and informing decision-making, yet their insights are often overlooked. The Australian Science Communicators, the peak body for science communication in Australia, attempts to bridge this gap. In groups students will explore one of two topics, either a) to develop appreciation for quality science communication by designing and/or implementing strategies to enhance recognition of high-quality science communication among scientists and leaders, exploring innovative tactics to showcase the value of expert science communication practice in shaping public opinion and policy; or b) to advance science communication practice by supporting growth of the evidence base in science communication, via collaborating with science communication practitioners and researchers to share knowledge. By strengthening science communication practices, we aim to ensure more effective dissemination of scientific knowledge and promotion of evidence-based decision-making among leaders. Your contribution to this project will help in shaping a more informed and scientifically democratised society.

Timetable: Tuesday 3 - 6 pm

Ernst and Young Australia and The University of Sydney – Reimagining Campus Food and Retail Culture

Home to over 70,000 students and 8,000 staff, the University of Sydney has responsibility to ensure that its shared spaces and retail offerings support a vibrant and inclusive campus life. The University is currently undertaking an ambitious plan to revitalise the Camperdown/Darlington retail, shared spaces, and food provisions on campus. This updated strategy needs to consider the campus as a place where diverse community groups can work, study, shop and eat. In interdisciplinary groups, students are asked to explore the following topics and provide recommendations to the University of Sydney on how they can revitalise the retail space and food provisions on campus. Students will look at key questions such as how can we create affordable and healthy food options on campus as well as retail facilities that meet the needs of the University’s diverse community groups? How can we create flexible spaces that can be used for quiet study, group work, socialisation, and events?  How can the university ensure that it is effectively consulting with students, staff, and business owners in the process?  During the project consultants from EY will also help support student learning by providing advice on project management, problem solving and presentation skills. 

Timetable: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

Freedom Solutions – Clever Solutions Made for Freedom

Freedom Solutions Australia is a not-for-profit organisation that designs and builds assistive technology solutions for people living with disability across NSW and VIC. We have supported over 50,000 people to live more independent lives and achieve their functional goals thanks to the clever ideas of our dedicated volunteers. Freedom Solutions has faced many obstacles and opportunities in the past couple of years, including a restructure, the COVID-19 pandemic, a complete rebrand and the transition to the NDIS (National Disability Insurance Scheme).This project seeks to propel Freedom Solutions into a new era of service excellence and innovations, particularly focusing on our Freedom Wheels and Unique Solutions service offering. Students are asked to dissect the organisation and make recommendations on how Freedom Solutions can step out of the dark ages and into the fast-paced future environment. Students will explore question such as how can Freedom Solutions differentiate themselves in a crowded landscape, streamline their approach to service delivery, navigate the NDIS landscape to secure funding, optimise resource allocation, and ensure the continuity of essential services. 

Timetable: Friday 1 - 4 pm

Girringun Aboriginal Corporation – Listening to Aboriginal Community Voices

This ICPU project will be delivered in partnership with SLIC (Service Learning in Indigenous Communities). For this project students will be working directly with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Therefore, students are required to complete an interview process to partake in this ICPU and cannot self-register via Sydney Student. Please read the information carefully on the SLIC website to ensure you understand what is required from participants of this project.

Girringun Aboriginal Community (GAC) was established in 1996 by Elders of its nine Traditional Owner member groups in north Queensland. GAC proudly serves its membership of around 800 Bandjin, Djiru, Girramay, Gugu Badhun, Gulngay, Jirrbal, Nywaigi, Warungnuand Warrgamay people and their families and communities. In this project students will have the opportunity to work with Aboriginal communities in north Queensland with University and Community supervisors and Girringun Aboriginal Corporation (GAC). GAC have identified five priority projects for students to explore. Review of Indigenous Protected Areas Management Plan 2013-2023, Process Unite, Girringun Junior Rangers Program, Wabu-Jananyu GAC-Rainforest Bounty Joint Venture, Implementing the GAC Strategic Communications Plan.

Timetable: Monday 4 - 7 pm

nandin Innovation Centre – Startup Challenges 

At nandin, imaginative and inventive minds come together to challenge, design, create and innovate. As ANSTO’s platform for design, innovation, and commercialisation, nandin is at the heart of deep technology innovation, supporting entrepreneurs and SMEs to start, scale and grow their business. The University of Sydney has partnered with three nandin businesses to provide students the opportunity to collaborate directly with founders on real challenges they face in their businesses. In this project students will work in interdisciplinary groups on one of the three topics with nandin startup founders. Areas to explore within this project include wastewater management with startup SVSR, improving online learning and training environments with real-time feedback systems with startup MAS Management Systems and creating a smarter care approach for the future of ageing with startup Crypses.  

Timetable: Friday 9 am - 12 pm

National Rugby League – Diversifying and Growing NRL Participation in Underrepresented Market

The challenge facing sports in Australia lies in the imperative to diversify and expand participation within underrepresented markets. The primary objectives are multifaceted, focusing on the identification and engagement of underrepresented cultural groups, notably the Indian, Chinese, and South-East Asian communities. A comprehensive and strategic approach is the needed for inclusion and diversity. Identification and prioritisation of state and territory market opportunities is required on a national scale. Collaborating in interdisciplinary groups students are required to develop strategies for tailored multilingual marketing and communications, as well as program delivery to effectively reach target groups. This entails eliminating barriers to participation and exploring connections between traditional cultural games, integration with the NRL/NRLW premiership and leveraging schools as gateways to communities focusing on the establishment of a specific participant journey tailored to the needs of targeted participants. In addition to these areas, investment or partnership opportunities that drive sustainability can also be explored for long-term success of initiatives aimed at diversifying and expanding participation in underrepresented markets.

Timetable: Monday 2 - 5 pm

NSW Department of Education – The Ethical use of AI in Early Childhood Education

The advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has highlighted risks and potential benefits for the education sector and its workforce. Research has been undertaken nationally and internationally in relation to the potential impact of this technology on teaching and learning in schools. To date there is little research unpacking these risks and potential benefits in relation to Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) for teachers and educators, children, and families. The NSW Department of Education would like to explore the impact AI could have on the ECEC workforce, the operation and running of ECEC services across NSW, and the provision of equitable and high quality ECEC, with consideration given to the specific needs of regional, rural, and remote (RRR) communities. We would like to explore whether there is a role for AI in supporting high quality pedagogy and practice in ECEC settings to achieve positive learning and development outcomes for all children, including unpacking the ethical and potential legal implications of using AI technology. To what extent can AI support administrative functions, to potentially reduce administrative burden and burnout for the ECEC workforce? Is there an effective role AI can play in the development and/or delivery of educational programs (including the preschool program)? What are the risks and potential benefits of using AI technology in assessment for and of learning, as outlined in the Early Years Learning Framework? Groups are encouraged to focus on a specific aspect of this complex problem as needed to deliver core insights.

Timetable: Monday 9 am - 12 pm

Paratus Clinical – Changing Public Attitudes Surrounding Vaccinations

The Thalidomide Scandal, considered the largest man-made medical disaster, highlighted the importance of rigorous safeguards and protocols in clinical trials. However, these crucial processes were mostly forgotten until COVID-19 brought them back to public attention. This renewed awareness of medical research offers hope, as mRNA technology shows promise in not only preventing future pandemics but also treating chronic diseases and cancers. Nevertheless, this heightened awareness has also led to increased fear and mistrust among the public, resulting in vaccine hesitancy and scepticism towards rapidly implemented new medical technologies. In this project, students will work to understand the current medical research market, evaluating public understanding of how medicines/vaccines are tested/approved and review the effectiveness of current recruitment tactics of patients for trials. In interdisciplinary groups, students will look to solve some of the current challenges that the clinical trials industry faces, including gaining public trust and recruiting patients for trials. Discovering the trend/s in public attitudes in regard to vaccination, will help enable the Healthcare industry to understand the current situation and predict future trends and evaluate the potential impact on vaccine research in Australia.   

Timetable: Tuesday 9 - 12 pm

Powerhouse Museum – Creative Industries Collaboration

The renewal of the Powerhouse marks a major shift in how Sydney thinks about itself, its culture and its communities. The Powerhouse will establish a new paradigm for museums through the creation of an institution that is innately flexible.  It will be a place designed to constantly evolve in response to the needs of its growing communities. Imagine cultural infrastructure that amplifies with clarity our stories, that sustains opportunities, that give us space to sit with difficult conversations, creating stories, and places and experiences so compelling that they force us to raise our eyes from the screen and step outside all of the constraints that we carry with us – even for a moment. In interdisciplinary students are asked to explore and develop recommendations for how the Powerhouse might establish a new paradigm for museums. Students will look to answer questions such as how can institutions develop meaningful relationships and initiatives to support local creative industries? What institution are currently doing this well? How can the Powerhouse provide opportunities for participation and collaboration with diverse established and emerging creative industries? How can the Powerhouse support cultural development and production through residency-style programs?

Timetable: Tuesday 12 - 3 pm

PTW Architects – Building for a Sustainable Future 

Our world is changing. Much of our built environment was created to suit historical times and is now in need of renewal and revitalization. We have an opportunity to adapt existing, underutilised environments to suit current and contemporary needs. How do we make the most of the opportunity to reinvent the places and spaces in which we live, work, transact and socialise, in ways that respond to modern human needs, but are also sustainable? This project invites students to find areas ripe for change – empty car parks, abandoned office buildings, redundant industrial areas, disused land and propose how these environments can be transformed to contribute to sustainable and smart cities of the future. Working in groups to leverage your diverse perspectives, you may choose to explore local, regional, or global shifts in urban living, working to understand the different needs of the stakeholders (community groups, governments, businesses, etc.) that shape the evolving needs of the city. Collaborating in interdisciplinary groups students can identify the most pressing environmental challenges in an urban context or consider technological advancements that bring us closer to harmonious solutions for a sustainable future. 

Students will have the choice, in conjunction with their assigned group, to preference either an online or in-person final group presentation, with a final determination to be made by the Academic Supervisor

Timetable: Tuesday 11 am - 2 pm

Rotary International – The Next Generation of Service

Rotary International is a global humanitarian organisation that was founded in 1905. With over 1.4 million members in over 200 countries, the organisation aims to promote peace, fight disease, provide clean water, save mothers and children, support education, and grow local economies. Rotary International is a global organisation with members from a diverse range of backgrounds and demographics. However, the majority of its members are typically middle-aged or older professionals, such as business owners, executives, and managers. This is partly due to the fact that Rotary has a long history and was originally established as a networking and service organisation for business leaders. However, Rotary is now working to attract a more diverse range of members, including younger people, women, and individuals from different cultures and backgrounds. In recent years, Rotary has made efforts to expand its reach and increase the diversity of its membership by implementing programs and initiatives designed to engage younger generations and promote inclusiveness. Despite these efforts, the demographic makeup of Rotary International's membership is still largely determined by its historical roots. Rotary is looking for solutions to broaden its demographics and include more young people. These solutions would need to focus on youth-led initiatives and leverage the power of social media in order to develop projects that engage and empower young people to become involved and to make change.

Timetable: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

Settlement Services International – Enhancing Volunteer Experiences

In the evolving landscape of community service, volunteerism plays a critical role. Settlement Services International (SSI), a national not-for-profit organization delivers settlement support, disability programs, community engagement initiatives, and training and employment pathways. Volunteers play a fundamental role in making these programs and services accessible to community and allow SSI to extend its reach and impact. However, the effective supervision of volunteers (which includes university and TAFE students) demands significant resources, relying heavily on direct oversight, hindering scalability. Interdisciplinary teams of ICPU students have a unique opportunity to reimagine this process, addressing issues such as inconsistent communication channels, unclear task assignments, and a lack of real-time progress tracking. How can technology be harnessed to enhance the volunteer supervision process? What communication strategies can bridge gaps and foster a cohesive and engaged volunteer and student community? In what ways can performance monitoring tools be utilized to ensure accountability and efficiency? How can the volunteer experience be leveraged for student employability? Students’ challenge is to create a solution that empowers volunteers to work autonomously, instilling a sense of ownership and accountability. Embrace diverse skill sets in technology, communication, social science and management to craft an innovative and sustainable solution that enhances the overall SSI volunteer experience.

Timetable: Tuesday 9 am - 12 pm

TATA India – Crafting the Future of Retail Innovation 

Please note that for this project our industry partners are based in India, so partners will engage with students virtually.  

Competition in the retail industry is fierce and dynamic, driven by ever-evolving consumer preferences, technological advancement and demand for real value-added services. Croma, a prominent electronics retail chain under the Tata Group in India, is looking for creative and innovative solutions to gain edge over its competitors locally and internationally. Croma has significantly increased its footprint with more than 440 stores in around 120+ cities in India, in addition to a strong online presence through croma.com. Croma offers over 22,000 products across 550+ brands through its stores spread in numerous major cities of India.

Focusing on the changes in consumer behaviour, popularity of e-commerce and value-added services, Croma aims to move beyond conventional offerings by addressing specific consumer needs across various product categories, including household appliances and personal electronics. In interdisciplinary student groups are asked to explore critical questions and propose interesting recommendations and ideas on creating awareness about services offered pre and post purchase, identifying and introducing new approaches and strategies that extend beyond traditional value-added services and develop an engaging digital promotion strategy aligned with modern consumer behaviour.

Timetable: Wednesday 3 - 6 pm

TerraCycle – Increasing Efficiencies Across Recycling Supply Chains

TerraCycle engages freight and courier services to collect and transport waste streams from every state of Australia, including from islands like Flinders and Norfolk, and remote health care clinics in the Northern Territory. At present the waste is transported to our Material Recovery Facilities, which are located in Melbourne Victoria. Once the pallets and boxes arrive at these facilities the contents are decanted, visually inspected and any contamination is manually removed. Waste streams are amalgamated and warehoused at these facilities to build to an agreed minimum threshold to ensure an efficient recycling processing run. Once these thresholds are reached the material is transported to processing facilities where it can be recycled. These facilities are located in every state of Australia, usually in industrial zones on the outskirts of major cities. In the context of rising oil prices, wages and increasing demand for transport services, how could TerraCycle improve the efficiency of this network, while maintaining national coverage? In interdisciplinary groups students will need to consider how TerraCycle can continue to provide their services nationwide, but also minimise their environmental impacts and carbon emissions. Students are asked to explore areas such as alternative supply chain structures and emerging transport technologies.  

Timetable: Monday 12 - 3 pm

The Infants Home – Valuing Early Childhood Educators

The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) sector has been faced with unprecedented workforce shortages throughout the pandemic and post pandemic period. A national survey in 2022 by the peak body, Early Childhood Australia, of over 700 educators across the country identified that educators are feeling under pressure, burn out and that they are underpaid and undervalued.  A recent report by the United Workers Union identified that feeling undervalued was one of the top three reasons that educators are choosing to leave the sector. These sector wide issues are being felt within The Infants’ Home on a day-to-day basis. The staff turnover rates that had historically been low compared to the sector average jumped significantly since 2020 and have continued to rise. Our annual staff survey has identified that educators within our organisation are being negatively impacted by this turnover due to the inconsistencies within their staff teams. Additionally, they are seeking recognition for their work and looking for a focus on wellbeing initiatives that support work/life balance. However, due to the highly regulated nature of ECEC, the typical initiatives that support a positive work/life balance such as opportunities to work from home and have flexible hours are virtually inaccessible for educators. In this project, students will work in interdisciplinary groups to explore innovative approaches and identify organisational level initiatives targeted to educators to provide recognition, show their work is valued and provide work/life balance.

Timetable: Wednesday 12 - 3 pm

Universities Admissions Centre – Reimagining University Admissions for Wider Access to Higher Education

Currently university admission is predominantly a numbers game and the personal attributes of an applicant, critical thinking, digital literacy, problem solving etc., are generally inferred from academic qualifications rather than specifically assessed as part of admissions. However, there is now a strong push for universities to admit students on broader criteria, while still ensuring that students are well prepared academically for university study. In this project, students may wish to consider how the current ATAR-based admission system works and how the key characteristics and attributes can be improved. Exploration of alternative models and frameworks used in other countries may be useful in determining the aspects of the current system that are worth retaining. Students are encouraged to propose new models including whether any new technologies can be leveraged to improve outcomes. Students must consider the implications of any recommended changes to the equitable allocation of university places, ensuring no group is significantly advantaged or disadvantaged.

Timetable: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

Westpac Banking Corporation – Using Digital Technologies to Improve User Experiences

Westpac is Australia’s oldest bank and company; they provide a broad range of banking and financial services. Westpac is focused on helping Australians succeed, ensuring customers can save and invest with confidence. Helping with the financial needs of small businesses, multi-national corporates, institutional and government clients, Westpac puts customers at the centre of everything they do. Westpac want to ensure the experiences for their customers and staff are quick and effortless, using technology to improve productivity, whilst focussing on user experience. In this project you will work in mixed disciplinary groups to explore solutions that take advantage of ways in which digital technologies can be used to deliver superior personalised services for customers or staff, to help put customers in control of their finances and to better understand and anticipate customer or staff needs. At the end of the project, you will pitch an innovative idea to help Westpac improve productivity or the experience of customers or staff in their branches, contact centres, corporate offices or in digital channels.

Timetable: Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm 

Timetable

Industry partner and project Timetable
ACON
Improving Health and Wellbeing Outcomes for LGBTQIA+ Peoples in Western Sydney 
Wednesday 10 am – 1 pm
Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation*
Innovation in Radiation Detection 
Friday 9 am - 12 pm 
Chau Chak Museum
Future proofing Revenue sources for the Chau Chak Wing Museum
Tuesday 12 pm – 3 pm
Cobham Youth Justice
Enhancing Family Engagement in Youth Justice Care
Thursday 9 am – 12 pm
Entyr
Building a Global Tyre waste market for a Sustainable Future
Monday 9 am – 12 pm
Elizabeth Broderick & Co
Putting Intersectionality at the Heart of Gender Equality
Thursday 10 am – 1 pm
Freedom Solutions
Driving Social Impact through Assistive Technologies in a Dynamic market
Monday 12 pm – 3 pm
Gilbert and Tobin
Towards a Sustainable Energy Transition
Monday 2pm – 5 pm
Girringun Aboriginal Corporation
Listening to Aboriginal Community Voices
Monday 10 am – 1 pm
Microsoft – University of Sydney
Building Capability for a Transformative Digital Campus Experience
Friday 9 am – 12 pm
Mission Australia
Ensuring Trauma informed Service delivery for Diverse People
Monday 9 am – 12 pm
NSW Department of Education*
Transforming Science Education through Real World Engagement 
Tuesday 2pm – 5 pm
NSW Department of Education
Growing the Early Childhood Education workforce in Regional NSW
Friday 10 am – 1 pm
Paratus Clinical
Rethinking Communication Strategies for Recruitment in Clinical Studies
Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm
Producible
Balancing Innovation and Human Ingenuity in Advertising
Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm
PTW Architects
Building for a Sustainable Future
Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm
Randstad 
The use and impact of Generative AI in the Recruitment process
Thursday 2 pm – 5 pm
Studio Space
Leveraging Data and Automation for an Innovative B2B Marketplace user experience
Wednesday 9 am – 12 pm
TATA India*
Driving the Future through Industry 4.0 Excellence
Wednesday 3 pm – 6 pm
TerraCycle
Design an Engagement Strategy for Gen Z and Alpha to engage in Free Recycling Programs
Monday 2 pm – 5pm
Tonkin Engineering
Transforming NSW Water Infrastructure with Sustainable Materials
Friday 9 am – 12 pm
Universities Admissions Centre
Reimagining University Admissions for Wider access to Higher Education
Wednesday 9 am - 12 pm

* SPCU students can enrol into all available projects. This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001.

ACON - Improving Health and Wellbeing Outcomes for LGBTQIA+ Peoples in Western Sydney 

Greater Western Sydney (GWS) is one of the most culturally, ethnically, and linguistically diverse, and economically disadvantaged regions in Australia. Research has demonstrated that LGBTQIA+ people living in GWS face disproportionate levels of psychological and physical health issues compared to the broader Australian population. Rates of psychological distress and HIV notifications are of particular concern. We know discrimination and exclusion have negative impacts on health and wellbeing, and this is compounded by intersecting experiences of marginalisation. In this project, students will generate recommendations for effective health and/or policy interventions for LGBTQIA+ people living in Greater Western Sydney. This project could be of interest to students with knowledge or interest in health promotion, community development, policy, public health, cultural difference, diversity and inclusion, or LGBTQ+ histories, experiences, and politics.

Wednesday 10 am – 1 pm

Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation - Innovation in Radiation Detection 

This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001

The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) is home to Australia’s most significant research infrastructure. Thousands of scientists benefit from accessing state-of-the-art instruments annually. Currently, ANSTO faces exciting public education and research challenges and invites interdisciplinary student groups to explore the following topic.

CORIS360 is an advanced gamma-ray imaging system developed by ANSTO, designed for rapid and accurate localisation of gamma radiation sources. This cutting-edge technology has applications in nuclear facilities, radiological emergencies, medical contexts, mining, construction, and environmental monitoring. However, there is a need to increase awareness of its benefits and potential applications. ANSTO is especially interested in exploring new contexts and frontiers for CORIS360. One high-profile example of this is when a small radioactive capsule was lost from a mining gauge in the WA Outback, CORIS360 was quickly modified to act as a vehicle-borne radiation detection system and locate the capsule within 2 hours. 

This project invites students to develop strategies to enhance the visibility and adoption of CORIS360. Focus areas are raising public and industry awareness of its capabilities, exploring innovative applications, and creating engaging demonstrations of its technology. Key questions include: How can we effectively communicate the advantages of CORIS360 to wider public? What novel applications can be identified? How can we creatively showcase the system’s capabilities?

Friday 9 am – 12 pm 

Chau Chak Museum - Future proofing Revenue sources for the Chau Chak Wing Museum

The Chau Chak Wing Museum (CCWM) at the University of Sydney is a nexus of culture and learning. Its 500,000 collection items, including antiquities, natural history specimens, historic photographs, cultural artefacts, and art, are displayed and stored in industry-standard conditions across four levels of public exhibition space and multiple levels of storage. The museum offers an immersive journey through time and culture open to all, with free entry for USYD staff, students, and the public. Maintaining this museum and associated operations, however, is a costly endeavour. As a medium-sized organisation comprising 30 full-time staff and partially funded by the university, the museum aims to achieve cost neutrality. How can the museum secure its future financial sustainability whilst caring for its collections, ensuring growth in visitor reach and numbers, world-class exhibitions and engagement programs and collaboration with community and cultural groups? How can the museum leverage its exhibitions and programs to diversify revenue streams? How might partnerships with external stakeholders contribute to the museum's financial stability? Student teams are invited to investigate these questions, to find ways of balancing the museum's role as a nonprofit service organisation and its commitment to engaging the wider community, with its need to remain financially viable.  

Tuesday 12 – 3 pm

Cobham Youth Justice - Enhancing Family Engagement in Youth Justice Care

Please note that this project addresses sensitive topics related to juvenile delinquency and youth justice. If you find this triggering, we encourage you to consider registering into another project.

Custodial facilities within the Youth Justice space have an obligation to meaningfully involve families in the life of young people who are incarcerated.  Whilst several avenues are currently available for this to occur for individual young people (eg: via in person visiting times, zoom, written correspondence, telephone) these are underutilised and insufficient.  Youth Justice would like to grow the ability to involve and connect with families (metropolitan and regional) in the consultation process for the management and care of young people.  The custodial environment is a complex one that relies heavily on daily routines, security protocols, hierarchical reporting structures and restrictive practice to manage/minimise risk.  The ongoing meaningful engagement of family within this environment will need to overcome some of the following:  risk to security, accessibility, cultural issues, complaints process, incarcerated parents, working with internal partners (Dept Education, NSW Health). Students from interdisciplinary backgrounds are invited to research and provide Youth Justice with innovative and novel alternative recommendations and solutions to maximise the ability to grow communication and collaboration with the family and community care givers young people in incarceration.

Thursday 9 am – 12 pm

Entyr - Building a Global Tyre waste market for a Sustainable Future

This Industry partner is based in Queensland. All engagement will be done via zoom.

Entyr Limited is a pioneering Australian company leading the world in solving the global tyre waste problem by delivering a complete circular solution for end-of-life tyres. Through upcycling end-of-life tyres and waste rubber, Entyr creates high quality products which replace virgin resources for use in manufacturing and decarbonising infrastructure. However, achieving a circular economy for the global tyre problem, whereby virgin materials are purposefully (re)used rather than wasted, faces many challenges. How does Entyr build business awareness of the value and opportunities within waste tyre management, including leveraging incentives such as carbon credits and other sector funding opportunities (e.g., Government research funds)?  How do we recruit talent to work within this sector to continue to innovate and build Entyr’s sustainability business model? How do we minimise waste and maximise business profitability in waste tyre management; for example, how do we best utilise the sour waste generated onsite from our tyre derived fuel oil process? How can we harness raw process plant instrumentation data into actionable insights, to support making a lasting impact on the global waste crisis (in tyres)? Interdisciplinary student groups are invited to work with Entyr to build their impact on the fight against tyre waste in the future.  

Monday 9 am – 12 pm  

Elizabeth Broderick & Co - Putting Intersectionality at the Heart of Gender Equality

The concept of ‘Intersectionality’, coined in the 1980s, explains the complex relationship of various identities and experiences of exclusion. It specifically addresses how gender and race intersect to shape the multiple dimensions of Black women’s experiences. Such overlapping inequalities manifest in compounded forms of marginalisation. For instance, in Australia, women with disabilities face double the likelihood of experiencing sexual and intimate partner violence compared to those without disabilities. Similarly, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia endure 29 times the rate of hospitalisation due to non-fatal family violence assaults compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. In India, the intersection of gender and caste exacerbates health risks for women, impacting access to sanitation and clean water. Meanwhile, in Latin America, indigenous women face significant economic disparities, ranking last on the income scale even after accounting for education. In Nigeria, ethnic, geographic, economic, and gender factors intersect to restrict educational opportunities, with only 12% of poor rural Hausa girls attending school. Recognising the shortcomings of conventional gender equality strategies, our project, led by Elizabeth Broderick & Co, seeks to embed intersectionality into policies promoting gender equality, diversity, and inclusion. Through rigorous examination and case studies, we aim to identify “what works” and explore effective approaches to integrate intersectionality from the outset, ensuring that policies not only reach but also benefit all women and girls. Projects will make recommendations on actions that governments, workplaces and other actors can take.

Thursday 10 am – 1 pm 

Freedom Solutions - Driving Social impact through Assistive Technologies in a Dynamic market

Freedom Solutions Australia (FSA) is a leading designer and provider of customised bikes, trikes, and assistive technology (AT) equipment for people with disability. We are a not-for-profit organisation with 150 active volunteers and 25 staff members across NSW and VIC, committed to bringing the best assistive technology solutions to our clients. Since 1975, FSA has supported over 50,000 people to live more independent lives and achieve their goals. Leveraging FSA’s existing assets is an urgent matter for the organisation. While we have faced many obstacles such as rebranding a 45-year-old trading name (formerly and widely known as TAD), increased competition in an oversaturated AT mass market, and NDIS funding dynamics, we have also gained opportunities. These include bringing an industrial designer on board to modernise our service proposition, launching a government-funded project, and leveraging high-tech assets (e.g., 3D printers, a CNC machine, etc.) for producing AT products. We have designed and produced various AT products such as mobility aids, therapy aids and sporting equipment using these machines. However, these significant assets have been utilised only 20% of the week and the products designed and produced with are not promoted and marketed effectively. In this project, interdisciplinary student groups will have an opportunity to unpack the complex challenges and opportunities Freedom Solutions faces in building the impact of its service. For example, how can we lift our brand from a provider of traditional ‘men’s-shed products’ to that of advanced AT? How do we compete in a ‘Drop-Shipping’ environment and what opportunities exist to diversity our income streams? How can we leverage our machinery, volunteers, and staff to strengthen and extend our impact on families and communities? 

Monday 12 – 3 pm

Gilbert and Tobin - Towards a Sustainable Energy Transition 

Gilbert and Tobin, an independent law firm in Australia, has a rich history spanning 35 years, during which it has solidified its position as a leader in corporate law, with exceptional prowess in corporate/M&A and banking practices. In the last decade, the firm has expanded its expertise to encompass burgeoning sectors like construction law, energy, and climate change. The contemporary landscape of energy transition presents both a challenge and an opportunity of profound significance. As society pivots towards renewable energy sources to combat climate change, a myriad of intricate questions surfaces. Does renewable energy enjoy widespread social acceptance necessary for comprehensive decarbonisation? How can we effectively manage the intermittency of renewable generation across different timeframes? What is the role of government and public subsidies in delivering energy transition at scale? Moreover, the viability and sustainability of energy storage solutions like hydrogen, and even the contentious role of nuclear energy, beg for further critical consideration. In response, interdisciplinary collaboration becomes important, inviting students to navigate the complexities of delivering a truly sustainable energy transition. Their task is not only to identify key challenges but also to formulate pragmatic recommendations that prioritise societal welfare, environmental preservation, and economic viability. The multifaceted nature of this task demands a holistic approach, considering technological capacities, engineering feasibility, economic implications, environmental impacts, social dynamics, and legal frameworks.

Monday 2 – 5 pm

Girringun Aboriginal Corporation - Listening to Aboriginal Community Voices

This ICPU project will be delivered in partnership with SLIC (Service Learning in Indigenous Communities). For this project students will be working directly with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Therefore, students are required to complete an interview process to partake in this ICPU and cannot self-register via Sydney Student. Please read the information carefully on the SLIC website to ensure you understand what is required from participants of this project.

Girringun Aboriginal Corporation (GAC) was established in 1996 by Elders of its nine Traditional Owner member groups in north Queensland. GAC proudly serves its membership of around 800 Bandjin, Djiru, Girramay, Gugu Badhun, Gulngay, Jirrbal, Nywaigi, Warungnuand Warrgamay people and their families and communities. In this project students will have the opportunity to work with Aboriginal communities in north Queensland with University, Girringun Aboriginal Corporation and community supervisors. Girringun Aboriginal Corporation is diverse and dynamic, and they are looking to expand their footprint in areas including community services, environment and marine protection, the Indigenous arts sector, biodiversity and education. Working with community on Country is one of the many steps that will be taken by incoming SLIC students as they actively engage in collaborations which integrate First Nations knowledge, together with real-life problem solving and learning.

Monday 10 am – 1 pm

Microsoft and University of Sydney - Building Capability for a Transformative Digital Campus Experience

In today’s rapidly evolving digital landscape, every aspect of our lives– including the way we work, learn and play – has become increasingly digitised.  The rapid acceleration of digitisation has given rise to the concept of the ‘digital native’ – referring to generations who have never known a world without digital devices. It has also raised important debates about the ethical boundaries of digitisation, particularly concerning the use of ‘big data’ and the values embraced by ‘Generation Swipe’.

Higher education is a key site for digital disruption. Driven by the need to adapt to changing demands, improve efficiencies and the student experience. Universities face multiple challenges and opportunities as they consider the capabilities and technologies needed for a future-focussed digital campus.

As Microsoft envisions this reimagining of the higher education sector there are some vital questions to answer, including: What barriers do University’s need to overcome to build their capacity to digitise with impact, while mitigating risks such as those relating to data breaches and academic integrity? What training do staff and students need? What aspects of the campus – from admissions, library services, well-being support, and classroom experiences – are ripe for digital transformation?  

For this ICPU program, talented University of Sydney students will work with Microsoft and University of Sydney stakeholders to provide insights and ideas to answer to these questions.

Friday 9 am – 12 pm

Mission Australia - Ensuring Trauma informed Service delivery for Diverse people

Please note that this project addresses sensitive topics related to trauma. If you find this triggering, we encourage you to consider registering into another project.

Mission Australia is a National not-for-profit organisation with a shared vision of an Australia where everyone has a safe home and can thrive. We collaborate with people experiencing homelessness or disadvantage to tackle the root causes of their challenges through providing access to safe, affordable homes and innovative, evidence-based support services. Many people who access support from Mission Australia present with trauma histories. The physical environment has a significant impact on the sense of safety and wellbeing of people with trauma histories who visit our services and reside within our accommodation and residential services. As an organisation, Mission Australia is interested in how we can better provide trauma informed physical environments for the diverse individuals and communities we work with. We invite students in interdisciplinary teams to explore diverse dimensions of this complex problem.  For example: what can we learn from other organisations and sectors outside the not-for-profit realm?  What are best practice principles that ensure we provide physical spaces that support the wellbeing of the diverse people we engage who have experienced trauma? Are there other forms of innovation that we should explore to transform and lift the impact of the organisation?

Monday 9 am – 12 pm

NSW Department of Education - Transforming Science education through Real World Engagement 

This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001

Science is critical for Australia’s future and depends on nurturing its scientific talent. Science education is undergoing a transformation, both in Australia and internationally, with emphasis placed on experiential learning and critical thinking skills. National and international science assessments reflect this changing landscape of science education. In NSW science syllabuses, depth studies provide opportunities to conduct inquiries and investigations that are not limited by syllabus specifications. Students who have completed the Science Extension course have demonstrated their capability to engage in high-level scientific research. Exploring authentic contexts while learning the nature and practice of science creates productive intellectual environments for constructing scientific knowledge structures and acquiring skills. It is becoming increasingly apparent that science teaching in schools should be complemented with immersion in scientific experiences beyond the classroom walls. Those augmented experiences may be provided by universities, research institutes, industry groups, National Parks, zoos, museums and science educational institutions. Despite the interest and willingness to foster such interactions, there are numerous barriers to seamless interaction between schools and external partners. The importance of overcoming these barriers, such as geographical disadvantage and socioeconomic factors, cannot be overstated. By doing so, we can improve the interactions between science professionals and teachers, transcend boundaries, and implement science without borders

Tuesday 2 – 5 pm

NSW Department of Education - Growing the Early Childhood Education Workforce in Regional NSW

Early childhood education and care (ECEC) provides an essential service in regional communities in NSW. It improves educational and developmental outcomes, especially for vulnerable and disadvantaged children, and increases economic opportunity and workforce participation, particularly for women. Nationally, a chronic workforce shortage is affecting ECEC delivery, with impacts often felt most strongly in regional communities. Some regional ECEC services struggle to attract, grow, retain and develop early childhood teachers and educators, leading to reduced service delivery and children and families missing out. 

The NSW Department of Education is investigating how it can support the ECEC workforce in regional areas. Your task is to research the problem and design a solution that supports the regional ECEC workforce.

In interdisciplinary teams, students are expected to explore dynamics of living and working in regional communities. Your methodology must be sensitive to geographical difference, using space or place-based methods where appropriate. You are encouraged to identify what other government departments both within Australia and potentially overseas have done to successfully attract, grow and retain their regional workforce. You may approach the topic from any perspective you wish – economic, social, cultural, technological, demographical, pedagogical or something else – but your solution must be practical, affordable, and innovative.

Friday 10 am – 1 pm 

Paratus Clinical - Rethinking Communication Strategies for Recruitment in Clinical Studies

Recruitment in clinical studies is a lengthy process with several complexities involved. Prior to attending a clinic to meet with the medical staff and begin the consenting process, there is a significant and extremely important amount of communication that occurs between Paratus Clinical and the participant considering the study. In the existing process, there is an initial pre-screening call, where the participant has the study explained to them, is given the opportunity to ask any questions and then goes through a checklist of questions to determine their eligibility. After this, the participant receives a confirmation email for time and date, with further introduction to their main contact point at the clinic and direction to the site provided. They are then sent the Informed Consent Form, usually 2 days prior to their appointment and have a reminder text 24 hours before.

The current process has several manual steps requiring participants to commit their time even before signing up and confirming the study. Artificial intelligence, automation and technology has transformed all sectors in various industries. Is there room for automation and AI? Would the human element and personal touch be compromised? Students in interdisciplinary groups are invited to explore innovative ways and approaches to this process to improve the engagement and experience of the participant. They are also expected to design a holistic implementation plan. 

Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm

Producible - Balancing Innovation and Human Ingenuity in Advertising

The team at Producible bring thoughtful creativity to the rigour and discipline of quality production and have done so for over 40 years. For us, it all starts with a producible concept, a great idea that can be achieved on time, on budget. We achieve this by stripping the concept back to its core, so it can be neatly measured, and tested for high levels of impact. In an era of artificial Intelligence, the evolution of the creative process poses a compelling challenge for aspiring marketers and advertisers. Crafting advertising that resonates deeply enough to "alter attitudes" or "change behaviours" demands the right mix of technical prowess and emotional intelligence to engage audiences effectively. Traditionally, the advertising creation journey involves several steps. While technology undeniably enhances efficiency and precision at each step, the indispensable role of human ingenuity is very important in making critical creative decisions. As AI continues to advance, envisioning the trajectory of the creative process becomes very important. How might AI influence each stage of advertising creation, and what areas of human intervention remain irreplaceable? This project invites students from all degrees/backgrounds to explore diverse aspects to examine the relationship between technological innovation and human creativity, analysing the potential shifts in roles and responsibilities within the advertising landscape. Students are encouraged to focus on specific moments in the creative development process where AI cannot readily replace humans. This should be kept a central theme of the project.

Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm

PTW Architects- Building for a Sustainable Future

Our world is changing. Much of our built environment was created to suit historical times and is now in need of renewal and revitalisation. We have an opportunity to adapt existing, underutilised environments to suit current and contemporary needs. How do we make the most of the opportunity to reinvent the places and spaces in which we live, work, transact and socialise, in ways that respond to modern human needs, but are also sustainable? This project invites students to find areas ripe for change – empty car parks, abandoned office buildings, redundant industrial areas, disused land and propose how these environments can be transformed to contribute to sustainable and smart cities of the future. Working in groups to leverage your diverse perspectives, you may choose to explore local, regional, or global shifts in urban living, working to understand the different needs of the stakeholders (community groups, governments, businesses, etc.) that shape the evolving needs of the city. Collaborating in interdisciplinary groups students can identify the most pressing environmental challenges in an urban context or consider technological advancements that bring us closer to harmonious solutions for a sustainable future. 

Tuesday 9 am – 12 pm

Randstad - The use and impact of Generative AI in the Recruitment process

At Randstad, we are more than a talent company; we are a partner. By serving as a trusted, working human partner in today's technology-driven and ever-changing world of talent, we help people and organisations realise their true potential and stay relevant in the world of work. In 2023, we helped 122,500 candidates find work while fostering around 15,548 client relationships locally. Our vision is to become the world’s most equitable and specialised talent company with a focus on being a partner for both our clients and the talent themselves. Technological advancement has the potential to deliver tremendous benefits, as well as new challenges for the recruitment sector and for Randstad. As a global leader in HR services, we are invested in combining the power of today’s technology with our passion for people. Development and use of AI has skyrocketed and enabled automation of many steps in our recruitment activities. Students will need to investigate innovative approaches leveraging AI, advanced technology, and creative strategies to make Randstad Australia the true “partner for talent” for our clients and candidates. They'll explore personalised service, digital changes, and using AI to improve how we interact with customers. They will look at feedback, map out customer experiences, and find new ways to connect with our internal and external stakeholders. By being innovative and using advanced digital technologies, students will help Randstad Australia give amazing customer experiences in the changing world of talent management.  

Thursday 2 – 5 pm

Studio Space - Leveraging Data and Automation for an Innovative B2B Marketplace user experience

StudioSpace is an international start-up, which delivers an innovative business-to-business (B2B) marketplace that allows small digital marketing agencies (‘studios’) to bid for large corporate work, leveraging our contracts and liabilities infrastructure. Current manual methods of creating and connecting client briefs to available talent lacks agility and efficiency. This process is ripe for uplift and transformation, including by building key vetting criteria into our matching process (such as geo-location, past performance and skills) as well as leveraging digitisation to automate. In this project, interdisciplinary teams are invited to consider the needs of our corporate clients such as HSBC (Banking), Jaguar Land Rover (Automotive), TAL (Insurance) and Google and participating studio talent. Can we leverage generative Artificial Intelligence (AI) to enhance user experience of this B2B marketplace? What is the scope for automating recommendations for clients, and how can selection bias risks be minimised? Is adequate data captured and how might this best be leveraged to ensure successful outcomes? All disciplines of study are welcome to join with opportunities for students with developer skills to also leverage their capability in tools like Node.js, Vue.js and/or Python. 

Wednesday 9 am – 12 pm

TATA India- Driving the Future through Industry 4.0 Excellence

Please note that for this project our industry partners are based in India, so partners will engage with students virtually.  

This project is only available to students who are enrolled in the shell unit SCPU3001

Tata AutoComp has a presence in 7 countries with 51 manufacturing facilities spread across India and 8 facilities spread across North America, Latin America, Europe, and China. Some of its leading clients include Jaguar Land Rover, Tata Motors, Mercedes Benz, Ford, Audi, and Volkswagen. By 2027, Tata AutoComp will be amongst the Top 2 auto-component companies in India by enabling mobility solutions with safe and sustainable products and services, exceeding customer expectations.With the onset of Industry 4.0 characterised by the integration of digital technologies into manufacturing and industrial processes, things like AI, IoT, Big Data etc., it has become critical for TATA Autocomp to ensure the digital future readiness of its business units. In this project, student teams are invited to explore what a roadmap to Industry 4.0 should look like. For example, how can Industry 4.0 practices be benchmarked and implemented within the discrete operational contexts of individual TATA Autocomp business units? What can we learn from change processes in similar industries and sectors? What does best practice look like for the future of Tata AutoComp? 

Wednesday 3 – 6 pm

TerraCycle- Design an Engagement Strategy for Gen Z and Alpha to engage in Free Recycling Programs

Unds TerraCycle has a unique business model which enables brands, manufacturers and retailers to achieve return on investment in recycling the hard-to-recycle waste and packaging they produce, by connecting their consumer-facing brands with a collector community. It’s a business model that works well in 21 countries around the world, and in Australia over a million people recycle hard-to-recycle waste through our programs. However, times are changing, and our brand partners, who pay for the recycling services, are looking for help to connect with a younger and more diverse audience. The TerraCyclers that actively engage with our free recycling programs are predominantly female and are likely to be over the age of 36. How can we design a campaign that would encourage a younger audience to sign up and collect recycling as part of our free recycling programs? Where should the recycling collection points be located? What channels should we use, and what mechanisms can we employ to motivate anyone under 30 to recycle on behalf of their community?  To be successful teams must propose and test an engagement strategy which results in the collection of hard-to-recycle waste though one or more of our free programs. This might involve setting up a recycling collection point for their local community, sporting club, place of worship, school, or any other venue which caters to a Generation Z or Alpha demographic.

Monday 2 – 5 pm

Tonkin Engineering - Transforming NSW Water Infrastructure with Sustainable Materials

A broad range of water infrastructure projects are in various stage of delivery in NSW, including construction and update of new pipelines and water storage facilities.  These projects will provide a secure and reliable source of water for our cities and rural communities. The capital delivery of water infrastructure projects is material intensive across a range of components including but not limited to pipes, trench backfill, valves and hydrants, premixed concrete and electrical. At the same time, there is a growing awareness and need for sustainability and recycled content materials across water infrastructure. As such, an evaluation of options to increase sustainability practices for water infrastructure projects in NSW is critical. In this project, interdisciplinary student groups are invited to develop viable, feasible and timely solutions to improve the sustainability of components and materials for new water infrastructure in NSW. Some of the questions that teams can explore include: How do we quantify the sustainability of a new alternative (e.g. embodied carbon, % recycled content, ethical procurement practices and standards compliance)? How do new materials compare with existing ones? Who are the potential suppliers? Are they based in NSW? Do they have the capability to deliver projects at a suitable scale? 

Friday 9 am – 12 pm 

Universities Admissions Centre - Reimagining University Admissions for Wider Access to Higher Education

Currently university admission is predominantly a numbers game and the personal attributes of an applicant, critical thinking, digital literacy, problem solving etc., are generally inferred from academic qualifications rather than specifically assessed as part of admissions. However, there is now a strong push for universities to admit students on broader criteria, while still ensuring that students are well prepared academically for university study. In this project, students may wish to consider how the current ATAR-based admission system works and how the key characteristics and attributes can be improved. Exploration of alternative models and frameworks used in other countries may be useful in determining the aspects of the current system that are worth retaining. Students are encouraged to propose new models including whether any new technologies can be leveraged to improve outcomes. Students must consider the implications of any recommended changes to the equitable allocation of university places, ensuring no group is significantly advantaged or disadvantaged. 

Wednesday 9 am – 12 pm

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Last updated: 09 July 2024

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