Skip to main content
Unit of study_

ECOS3002: Development Economics

Semester 2, 2020 [Normal day] - Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney

This unit examines the economic transformation of less-developed countries from microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. It covers applied topics such as education, health, nutrition, demographics, labour, agriculture and the private sector, focusing on how policies attempt to overcome market and institutional failures that are particularly acute in the developing world. Focus is given to applying theoretical and empirical tools necessary to conceptualise, analyse and interpret various issues in economic development. Applied examples from developing countries are used throughout the unit.

Unit details and rules

Unit code ECOS3002
Academic unit Economics
Credit points 6
Prohibitions
? 
None
Prerequisites
? 
ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2002 or ECOS2902
Corequisites
? 
None
Assumed knowledge
? 

None

Available to study abroad and exchange students

Yes

Teaching staff

Coordinator Shyamal Chowdhury, shyamal.chowdhury@sydney.edu.au
Type Description Weight Due Length
Final exam (Record+) Type B final exam Final exam
Both short as well as essay type questions will be included.
50% Formal exam period 2 hours
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3
In-semester test (Record+) Type B in-semester exam Mid-semester exam
Both short as well as essay type questions will be included.
30% Week 07
Due date: 15 Oct 2020 at 14:00
50 minutes
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3
Assignment Written assessment
Long answer/essay, online submission.
20% Week 11
Due date: 12 Nov 2020 at 17:00

Closing date: 25 Nov 2020
1000 words
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3
Type B final exam = Type B final exam ?
Type B in-semester exam = Type B in-semester exam ?

Assessment summary

Detailed information for each assessment can be found on Canvas.

Assessment criteria

The University awards common result grades, set out in the Coursework Policy 2014 (Schedule 1).

As a general guide, a High distinction indicates work of an exceptional standard, a Distinction a very high standard, a credit a good standard, and a pass an acceptable standard.

Result name

Mark range

Description

High distinction

85 - 100

 

Distinction

75 - 84

 

Credit

65 - 74

 

Pass

50 - 64

 

Fail

0 - 49

When you don’t meet the learning outcomes of the unit to a satisfactory standard.

 

For more information see sydney.edu.au/students/guide-to-grades

For more information see guide to grades.

Late submission

In accordance with University policy, these penalties apply when written work is submitted after 11:59pm on the due date:

  • Deduction of 5% of the maximum mark for each calendar day after the due date.
  • After ten calendar days late, a mark of zero will be awarded.

Academic integrity

The Current Student website  provides information on academic integrity and the resources available to all students. The University expects students and staff to act ethically and honestly and will treat all allegations of academic integrity breaches seriously.  

We use similarity detection software to detect potential instances of plagiarism or other forms of academic integrity breach. If such matches indicate evidence of plagiarism or other forms of academic integrity breaches, your teacher is required to report your work for further investigation.

You may only use artificial intelligence and writing assistance tools in assessment tasks if you are permitted to by your unit coordinator, and if you do use them, you must also acknowledge this in your work, either in a footnote or an acknowledgement section.

Studiosity is permitted for postgraduate units unless otherwise indicated by the unit coordinator. The use of this service must be acknowledged in your submission.

Simple extensions

If you encounter a problem submitting your work on time, you may be able to apply for an extension of five calendar days through a simple extension.  The application process will be different depending on the type of assessment and extensions cannot be granted for some assessment types like exams.

Special consideration

If exceptional circumstances mean you can’t complete an assessment, you need consideration for a longer period of time, or if you have essential commitments which impact your performance in an assessment, you may be eligible for special consideration or special arrangements.

Special consideration applications will not be affected by a simple extension application.

Using AI responsibly

Co-created with students, AI in Education includes lots of helpful examples of how students use generative AI tools to support their learning. It explains how generative AI works, the different tools available and how to use them responsibly and productively.

WK Topic Learning activity Learning outcomes
Week 01 Introduction and overview: foundations of development economics Lecture (2 hr) LO1
Introduction and overview: foundations of development economics Tutorial (1 hr) LO1
Week 02 Income inequality, poverty (traps) and development Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2
Introduction and overview: foundations of development economics Tutorial (1 hr) LO1
Week 03 Evaluating development impacts Lecture (2 hr) LO2 LO3
Income inequality, poverty (traps) and development Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2
Week 04 Markets in developing countries - land market Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Evaluating development impacts Tutorial (1 hr) LO2 LO3
Week 05 Labour and migration Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Markets in developing countries - land market Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 06 Economics of lending to the poor Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Labour and migration Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 07 Risk, insurance and technology adoption - I Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Economics of lending to the poor Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 08 Risk, insurance and technology adoption - II Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Economics of lending to the poor Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 09 Human capital (nutrition, productivity and poverty-trap) Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Risk, insurance and technology adoption Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 10 Transfers and social protections Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Human capital (nutrition, productivity and poverty-trap) Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 11 Governance, corruption and political economy of development Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Transfers and Social Protections Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Week 12 Review of unit contents Lecture (2 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3
Governance, corruption and political economy of development Tutorial (1 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3

Attendance and class requirements

  • Attendance: According to Faculty Board Resolutions, students in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences are expected to attend 90% of their classes. If you attend less than 50% of classes, regardless of the reasons, you may be referred to the Examiner’s Board. The Examiner’s Board will decide whether you should pass or fail the unit of study if your attendance falls below this threshold.
  • Lecture recording: Most lectures (in recording-equipped venues) will be recorded and may be made available to students on the LMS. However, you should not rely on lecture recording to substitute your classroom learning experience.
  • Preparation: Students should commit to spend approximately three hours’ preparation time (reading, studying, homework, essays, etc.) for every hour of scheduled instruction.

Study commitment

Typically, there is a minimum expectation of 1.5-2 hours of student effort per week per credit point for units of study offered over a full semester. For a 6 credit point unit, this equates to roughly 120-150 hours of student effort in total.

Required readings

All readings for this unit can be accessed on the Library eReserve link available on Canvas.

  • Recommended textbook: Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics. Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ.
  • Recommended textbook: Bowles, S., S. Durlauf, and K. Hoff. Eds. 2006. Poverty Traps. Princeton and New York: Princeton University Press and Russell Sage Foundation.

 

Learning outcomes are what students know, understand and are able to do on completion of a unit of study. They are aligned with the University's graduate qualities and are assessed as part of the curriculum.

At the completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • LO1. understand the key microeconomic issues relating to economic development and poverty reduction
  • LO2. utilise commonly used empirical tools in development microeconomics
  • LO3. formulate, evaluate and communicate development policies and interventions.

Graduate qualities

The graduate qualities are the qualities and skills that all University of Sydney graduates must demonstrate on successful completion of an award course. As a future Sydney graduate, the set of qualities have been designed to equip you for the contemporary world.

GQ1 Depth of disciplinary expertise

Deep disciplinary expertise is the ability to integrate and rigorously apply knowledge, understanding and skills of a recognised discipline defined by scholarly activity, as well as familiarity with evolving practice of the discipline.

GQ2 Critical thinking and problem solving

Critical thinking and problem solving are the questioning of ideas, evidence and assumptions in order to propose and evaluate hypotheses or alternative arguments before formulating a conclusion or a solution to an identified problem.

GQ3 Oral and written communication

Effective communication, in both oral and written form, is the clear exchange of meaning in a manner that is appropriate to audience and context.

GQ4 Information and digital literacy

Information and digital literacy is the ability to locate, interpret, evaluate, manage, adapt, integrate, create and convey information using appropriate resources, tools and strategies.

GQ5 Inventiveness

Generating novel ideas and solutions.

GQ6 Cultural competence

Cultural Competence is the ability to actively, ethically, respectfully, and successfully engage across and between cultures. In the Australian context, this includes and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, knowledge systems, and a mature understanding of contemporary issues.

GQ7 Interdisciplinary effectiveness

Interdisciplinary effectiveness is the integration and synthesis of multiple viewpoints and practices, working effectively across disciplinary boundaries.

GQ8 Integrated professional, ethical, and personal identity

An integrated professional, ethical and personal identity is understanding the interaction between one’s personal and professional selves in an ethical context.

GQ9 Influence

Engaging others in a process, idea or vision.

Outcome map

Learning outcomes Graduate qualities
GQ1 GQ2 GQ3 GQ4 GQ5 GQ6 GQ7 GQ8 GQ9

This section outlines changes made to this unit following staff and student reviews.

The assessments have been adjusted based on the feedback received from students.

ECOS3002 - WEEK-BY-WEEK READING LIST

Here is a week by week guide to the topics, class schedule and the required and recommended readings. They should be considered flexible. As the unit progresses, additional readings may be suggested. Similarly, depending on the time and interests, all the suggested topics may not be covered, and additional topics may be added.

 

WEEK 1:

Introduction and Overview: Foundations of Development Economics

Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapters 1-4.

Recommended Readings:

  • *Besley, Timothy and Burgess, Robin. 2003. Halving Global Poverty. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 17 (3), 3-22
  • Sachs, J. 2005. The End of Poverty. Time Magazine, March 14, 2005.
  • Easterly, W. 2006. The Big Push deja vu: A Review of Jeffry Sachs's The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities of Our Time. Journal of Economic Literature, 44(1): 96-105.
  • Page, Lucy, Pande, Rohini. 2018. Ending Global Poverty: Why Money Isn’t Enough. Journal of Economic Perspectives, 32 (4), 173-200.
  • Jones, C., and Klenow, P. 2016. Beyond GDP? Welfare Across Countries and Time. American Economic Review, 106(9): 2426-2475.
  • Thirlwall, A.P., & Pacheco-Lopez, P. 2017. Economics of Development: Theory and Evidence, Palgrave Macmillan, Chapter 1.
  • *World Bank, 2007, World development report 2008 – Agriculture for Development.

 

WEEK 2:

Income Inequality, Poverty (traps) and Development

  • Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapters 6 & 8.
  • Banerjee, A., and E. Duflo. 2011., Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, Public Affairs, Chapter 1.

Recommended Readings:

  • *Deaton, A. 2003. Measuring Poverty in a Growing World (or Measuring Growth in a Poor World). NBER Working Paper 9822.
  • Picketty, T. 2014.  Capital in the Twenty-first Century, Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. Cambridge, MA
  • Picketty et al. 2018. Distributional National Accounts: Methods and Estimates for the United States. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 133(2): 553-609.  
  • Thirlwall, A.P., & Pacheco-Lopez, P. 2017. Economics of Development: Theory and Evidence, Palgrave Macmillan, Chapter 2
  • World Development Indicators 2008: Poverty Data, A supplement to World Development Indicators 2008, World Bank.
  • Bowles, S., S. Durlauf, and K. Hoff. Eds. 2006. Poverty Traps. Princeton and New York: Princeton University Press and Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Barrett, C., and M. Carter. 2013. The Economics of Poverty Traps and Persistent Poverty: Empirical and Policy Implications. Journal of Development Studies, 49(7): 976-990.
  • Blundell, R., M. Costa Dias, R. Joyce, and X. Xu. 2020. COVID-19 and Inequalities. Fiscal Studies, 41 (2): 191-319.

 

WEEK 3:

Evaluating Development Impacts

Recommended Readings:

  • Abadie, Alberto and Cattaneo, Matias D. 2018. Econometric Methods for Program Evaluation. Annual Review of Economics, 10: 465-503.
  • Athey, S. and Imbens, G.W. 2017. The Econometrics of Randomized Experiments. In Duflo, E., and Banerjee, A. (Eds), Handbook of Economic Field Experiments, Volume 1, Chapter 3, Amsterdam, North Holland. 
  • Esther Duflo, Rachel Glennerster and Michael Kremer. 2006. Using Randomization in Development Economics Research: A Toolkit. In Handbook of Development Economics, Volume 4, Pages 3895-3962, edited by T. Paul Schultz and John Strauss, Amsterdam, North-Holland.
  • Ravallion, Martin. 2007. Evaluating Anti-poverty Programs. In Handbook of Development Economics, Volume 4, Pages 3787-3846, edited by T. Paul Schultz and John Strauss, Amsterdam, North-Holland. 
  • Abhijit Banerjee, Rukmini Banerji, James Berry, Esther Duflo, Harini Kannan, Shobhini Mukerji, Marc Shotland, and Michael Walton. 2017. “From Proof of Concept to Scalable Policies: Challenges and Solutions, with an Application.” Journal of Economic Perspectives, 31(4): 73–102.
  • Deaton, A., N. Cartwright. 2018. Understanding and Misunderstanding Randomized Controlled Trials. Social Science and Medicine, 210:2-21.
  • Ravallion, Martin. 2020. Should the Randomistas (Continue to) Rule? NBER Working Paper 27554 (https://www.nber.org/papers/w27554).

 

 

 

WEEK 4:

Markets in Developing Countries - Land market

  • Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapters 11 & 12

Recommended Readings:

  • Banerjee, A., Gertler, P., and Ghatak, M. 2002. Empowerment and Efficiency: Tenancy Reform in West Bengal. Journal of Political Economy 110: 239-280.
  • Goldstein, M., K. Houngbedji, F. Kondylis, M. O’Sullivan, and H. Selod. 2018. Formalization without Certification? Experimental Evidence on Property Rights and Investment. Journal of Development Economics, 132: 57-74.
  • Bowles, Samuel and Herbert Gintis. 2000. Walrasian Economics in Retrospect. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 115 (4): 1411-1439.
  • Geertz, Clifford. 1978. The Bazaar Economy: Information and Search in Peasant Marketing. American Economic Review, 68(2): 28-32.

 

WEEK 5:

Labour and Migration

Ray, D. 1998. Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapter 10

Recommended Readings:

  • Harris, John R., and Todaro, Michael P. 1970. Migration, Unemployment and Develpment: A Two-Sector Analysis. American Economic Review, 1: 126-142.
  • Bryan, Gharad, Shyamal Chowdhury, and A. Mushfiq Mobarak. 2014. Under-investment in a Profitable Technology: The Case of Seasonal Migration in Bangladesh. Econometrica, 82(5): 1671-1748.
  • Gibson, John, David McKenzi, Halahingano Rohorua and Steven Stillman. 2018. The Long-Term Impacts of International Migration: Evidence from a Lottery. World Bank Economic Review, 32 (1): 127–147
  • Thirlwall, A.P., & Pacheco-Lopez, P. 2017. Economics of Development: Theory and Evidence, Palgrave Macmillan, Chapter 5
  • Hendricks. Lutz, and Schoellman, Todd. 2018. Human Capital and Development Accounting: New Evidence from Wage Gains at Migration. Quarterly Journal of Economics, 665-700. 
  • Kinnan, C., S. Wang and Y. Wang. 2018. Access to Migration for Rural Households. American Economic Journal-Applied Economics, 10(4): 79-119.
  • Bryan, G., and M. Morten. 2019. The Aggregate Productivity Effects of Internal Migration: Evidence from Indonesia. Journal of Political Economy, 127(5): 2229-2268.
  • World Bank. 2010. World Development Report 2010: Development and Climate Change. Washington, DC. World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/4387

 

WEEK 6:

Economics of Lending to the Poor

Ray, D. 1998. Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapter 14.

Recommended Readings:

  • Morduch, J. 1998. Does Microfinance Really Help the Poor? Evidence from Flagship Programs in Bangladesh. Hoover Institution, Stanford University working paper.
  • Banerjee, A. 2013. Microcredit Under the Microscope: What Have We Learned in the Past Two Decades, and What Do We Need to Know? Annual Review of Economics, 5: 487-519.
  • Roodman, D., and J. Morduch. 2014. The Impact of Microcredit on the Poor in Bangladesh: Revisiting the Evidence. Journal of Development Studies, 50(4): 583-604.
  • Banerjee, A., D. Karlan, J. Zinman. 2015. Six Randomized Evaluations of Microcredit: Introduction and Further Steps. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7(1): 1-21.
  • Wydick, Bruce. 2016. Microfinance on the Margin: Why Recent Impact Studies May Understate Average Treatment Effects, Journal of Development Effectiveness, 8 (2): 257-265.
  • Meager, R (2019), "Understanding the average impact of microcredit expansions: A Bayesian hierarchical analysis of seven randomised experiments." American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 11(1): 57-91.

 

WEEK 7:

Mid-term exam

 

 

 

Week 8

Credit, Insurance and Technology Adoption

  • Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapter 15

Recommended Readings:

  • De Janvry, A., Emerick, K., Sadoulet, E., and Dar, M. 2016. The Agricultural Technology Adoption Puzzle: What Can We Learn from Field Experiments. FERDI Working Paper 178.
  • Foster, A., Rosenzweig, M. 2010. Microeconomics of Technology Adoption. Annual  Review of Economics, 2: 395-424.
  • Cole, Shawn, Xavier Giné, Jeremy Tobacman, Petia Topalova, Robert Townsend, and James Vickery. 2013. "Barriers to Household Risk Management: Evidence from India." American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 5(1): 104-35.
  • Beaman, Lori, Dean Karlan, Bram Thuysbaert, and Christopher Udry. 2020. Self-Selection into Credit Markets: Evidence from Agriculture in Mali. Crepon, Bruno, Florencia Devoto, Esther Duo, and William Pariente. 2015. Estimating the Impact of Microcredit on Those Who Take it up: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Morocco. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7(1): 123-50.
  • Tarozzi, Alessandro, Jaikishan Desai, and Kristin Johnson. 2015. The Impacts of Microcredit: Evidence from Ethiopia. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7(1): 54-89.

 

WEEK 9:

Human Capital (Nutrition, Productivity and Poverty-Trap)

  • Ray, D. (1998). Development Economics, Princeton University Press, Princeton NJ., Chapter 8 (272-279), Chapter 13 (489-540)

Recommended Readings:

  • Cervellati, M. and U. Sunde, 2005. Human Capital Formation, Life Expectancy, and the Process of Development, American Economic Review, 95 (5): 1653-1672.
  • Attanasio, O., C. Meghir, and E. Nix. 2020. Human Capital Development and Parental Investment in India. Review of Economic Studies,  
  • Mani, Anandi, Sendhil Mullainathan, Eldar Shafir, and Jiaying Zhao. 2013. Poverty Impedes Cognitive Function. Science, 341(6149): 976-980.
  • Thomas, D., E. Frankenberg, J. Friedman, J.-P. Habicht, M. Hakimi, N. Ingwersen, N. Jones, C. McKelvey, G. Pelto, B. Sikoki, T. Seeman, J. Smith, C. Sumantri, W. Suriastini, S. Wilopo. 2006. Causal Effect of Health on Labor Market Outcomes: Experimental Evidence. California Center for Population Research.
  • Walter Willett, Johan Rockström, Brent Loken, Marco Springmann, Tim Lang, Sonja Vermeulen, Tara Garnett, David Tilman, Fabrice DeClerck, Amanda Wood, Malin Jonell, Michael Clark, Line J Gordon, Jessica Fanzo, Corinna Hawkes, Rami Zurayk, Juan A Rivera, Wim De Vries, Lindiwe Majele Sibanda, Ashkan Afshin, Abhishek Chaudhary, Mario Herrero, Rina Agustina, Francesco Branca, Anna Lartey, Shenggen Fan, Beatrice Crona, Elizabeth Fox, Victoria Bignet, Max Troell, Therese Lindahl, Sudhvir Singh, Sarah E Cornell, K Srinath Reddy, Sunita Narain, Sania Nishtar, Christopher J L Murray. 2019. Food in the Anthropocene: the EAT–Lancet Commission on Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems. Lancet 393: 447-92.

 

WEEK 10:

Poverty (traps) and Transfers (and Social Protections)

  • Currie, J. and Gahvari, F. 2008. Transfers in Cash and in-Kind: Theory Meets the Data. Journal of Economic Literature, 46 (2): 333-383

Recommended Readings:

  • Baird, S., C. McIntosh, B. Ozler. 2011. Cash or Condition? Evidence from a Cash Transfer Experiment. Quarterly Journal of Economics 126 (4): 1709-1753.
  • Banerjee, A., E. Duflo, N. Goldberg, D. Karlan, R. Osei, W. Parienté, J. Shapiro, B. Thuysbaert, and C. Udry. 2015. A Multifaceted Program Causes Lasting Progress for the Very Poor: Evidence from Six Countries. Science 348 (6236):1-18.
  • Parker, S and V. Vogl. 2018. Do Conditional Cash Transfers Improve Economic Outcomes in the Next Generation? Evidence from Mexico. NBER Working Paper 24303.
  • Vivi Alatas, Abhijit Banerjee, Rema Hanna, Benjamin A. Olken, and Julia Tobias. 2012. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia. American Economic Review, 102(4): 1206-1240.
  • Hanna, R., and B. Olken. 2018. Universal Basic Incomes versus Targeted Transfers: Anti-Poverty Programs in Developing Countries. Journal of Economic Perspective, 32(4): 201-226. 
  • Banerjee, A., P. Niehaus, T. Suri. 2019. Universal Basic Income in the Developing World. Annual Review of Economics, 11: 959-83.
  • Balboni, C., O. Bandiera, R. Burgess, M. Ghatak, and A. Heil. 2020. Why Do People Stay Poor?. STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 067, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.

 

 

 

WEEK 11:

Governance, Corruption and Political Economy of Development

Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo. 2011., Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, Public Affairs, Chapter 10.

Recommended Readings:

  • World Bank. 2003. World Development Report: Making Services Work for Poor People. Oxford University Press.
  • Olken, Benjamin A. 2019. Designing Anti-Poverty Programs in Emerging Economies in the 21st Century: Lessons from Indonesia for the World, Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, 55(3): 319-339
  • Daron Acemoglu & Suresh Naidu & Pascual Restrepo & James A. Robinson. 2019. Democracy Does Cause Growth. Journal of Political Economy, 127(1): 47-100.
  • Engerman, S., and K. Sokoloff. 2006. The Persistence of Poverty in Americas: The Role of Institutions. In: Bowles, S., S. Durlauf, and K. Hoff. (Eds). Poverty Traps, Chapter 2. Princeton and New York: Princeton University Press and Russell Sage Foundation.

 

WEEK 12:

Review of unit contents

 

 

Articles for review

  1. Angelucci, M., D. Karlan and J. Zinman. 2015. Microcredit Impacts: Evidence from a Randomized Microcredit Program Placement Experiment by Compartamos Banco. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7 (1): 151-82.
  2. Attanasio, O., B. Augsburg, R. De Haas, E. Fitzsimons and H. Harmgart. 2015. The Impacts of Microfinance: Evidence from Joint-Liability Lending in Mongolia. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7 (1): 90-122.
  3. Augsburg, B., R. De Haas, H. Harmgart and C. Meghir. 2015. The Impacts of Microcredit: Evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7 (1): 183-203.
  4. Banerjee, A., E. Duflo, R. Glennerster and C. Kinnan. 2015. The Miracle of Microfinance? Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation, American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7 (1): 22-53.
  5. Baquero, G., Hamadi, M. and Heinen, A. 2018. Competition, loan rates and information dispersion in microcredit markets, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, 50(5):893-937.
  6. Crépon, B., F. Devoto, E. Duflo and W. Parienté. 2015. Estimating the Impact of Microcredit on Those Who Take It Up: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Morocco. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7 (1): 123-50.
  7. Field, E, R. Pande, J. Papp, and N. Rigol. 2013. Does the Classic Microfinance Model Discourage Entrepreneurship among the Poor? Experimental Evidence from India. American Economic Review, 103 (6): 2196-2226.
  8. McIntosh, C., A. de Janvry, and E. Sadoulet. 2005. How Rising Competition among Microfinance Institutions Affects Incumbent Lenders. Economic Journal, 115: 987–1004.
  9. Schaner, S. 2018. The Persistent Power of Behavioral Change: Long-Run Impacts of Temporary Savings Subsidies for the Poor. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 10 (3): 67-100.
  10. Tarozzi, A., J. Desai and K. Johnson. 2015. The Impacts of Microcredit: Evidence from Ethiopia. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 7 (1): 54-89.

 

Disclaimer

The University reserves the right to amend units of study or no longer offer certain units, including where there are low enrolment numbers.

To help you understand common terms that we use at the University, we offer an online glossary.