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Unit of study_

NTDT5612: Dietetics Training Placement

Nutrition and Dietetics Placement Session 1, 2023 [Professional practice] - Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney

During experiential placement students develop further knowledge and skills in each of three areas of nutrition and dietetic practice; individual case management, community and public health nutrition and food service management. The 20-week semester commences late January (Semester 1) or late June/early July (Semester 2). Individual case management will take place in a variety of acute and ambulatory settings allowing exposure to a variety of medical nutrition cases that affect different body systems. Settings include hospitals, aged care facilities, disability services, mental health services and private practice. Community and public health settings include health promotion units in government, non-government and private health organisations. Food service settings include acute care health facilities, aged care, and community and commercial food service organisations providing services to vulnerable population, groups such as meals on wheels. Placement supervisors are Accredited Practising Dietitians (APD) and trained to ensure they meet the standards of supervision required by the University of Sydney. Placements can be in metropolitan or rural settings, inter- and intra-state.

Unit details and rules

Unit code NTDT5612
Academic unit Nursing and Midwifery
Credit points 24
Prohibitions
? 
None
Prerequisites
? 
NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 and (NTDT5602 or FMHU5001) and NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 and NTDT5608
Corequisites
? 
None
Assumed knowledge
? 

None

Available to study abroad and exchange students

No

Teaching staff

Coordinator Margaret Nicholson, margaret.nicholson@sydney.edu.au
Type Description Weight Due Length
Skills-based evaluation Assessment 1 - Health Collaboration Challenge
7 minute video + abstract + peer review
0% Ongoing 7 minute video plus written submission
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4
Placement Assessment 2 - Placement competence
Competency attainment
100% Ongoing 20 weeks
Outcomes assessed: LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5

Assessment summary

Assessment 1: Health Collaboration Challenge – video + abstract + peer review

Assessment 2: Placement competence – NTDT5612 is awarded a satisfactory or fail result grade on completion of the student’s placement program based on the DAA entry-level competencies.

 

Assessment criteria

Pass/Fail Competency Based

For more information see guide to grades.

Late submission

In accordance with University policy, these penalties apply when written work is submitted after 11:59pm on the due date:

  • Deduction of 5% of the maximum mark for each calendar day after the due date.
  • After ten calendar days late, a mark of zero will be awarded.

This unit has an exception to the standard University policy or supplementary information has been provided by the unit coordinator. This information is displayed below:

*Where an assignment is submitted late without an approved extension, a late penalty will apply. For every calendar day up to and including ten calendar days after the due date a penalty of 5% of the maximum awardable marks will be applied to late work. For work submitted more than ten calendar days after the due date a mark of zero marks will be awarded.

Academic integrity

The Current Student website  provides information on academic integrity and the resources available to all students. The University expects students and staff to act ethically and honestly and will treat all allegations of academic integrity breaches seriously.  

We use similarity detection software to detect potential instances of plagiarism or other forms of academic integrity breach. If such matches indicate evidence of plagiarism or other forms of academic integrity breaches, your teacher is required to report your work for further investigation.

You may only use artificial intelligence and writing assistance tools in assessment tasks if you are permitted to by your unit coordinator, and if you do use them, you must also acknowledge this in your work, either in a footnote or an acknowledgement section.

Studiosity is permitted for postgraduate units unless otherwise indicated by the unit coordinator. The use of this service must be acknowledged in your submission.

Simple extensions

If you encounter a problem submitting your work on time, you may be able to apply for an extension of five calendar days through a simple extension.  The application process will be different depending on the type of assessment and extensions cannot be granted for some assessment types like exams.

Special consideration

If exceptional circumstances mean you can’t complete an assessment, you need consideration for a longer period of time, or if you have essential commitments which impact your performance in an assessment, you may be eligible for special consideration or special arrangements.

Special consideration applications will not be affected by a simple extension application.

Using AI responsibly

Co-created with students, AI in Education includes lots of helpful examples of how students use generative AI tools to support their learning. It explains how generative AI works, the different tools available and how to use them responsibly and productively.

WK Topic Learning activity Learning outcomes
Multiple weeks Medical Nutrition Therapy, Community/Public Health Nutrition & Food Service Management Clinical practice (800 hr) LO1 LO2 LO3 LO4 LO5

Attendance and class requirements

Attendance is compulsory

Study commitment

Typically, there is a minimum expectation of 1.5-2 hours of student effort per week per credit point for units of study offered over a full semester. For a 24 credit point unit, this equates to roughly 480-600 hours of student effort in total.

Learning outcomes are what students know, understand and are able to do on completion of a unit of study. They are aligned with the University's graduate qualities and are assessed as part of the curriculum.

At the completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • LO1. practise professionally
  • LO2. positively influence the health of individuals, groups and/or populations
  • LO3. apply critical thinking skills and integrate evidence into practice
  • LO4. collaborate with clients and stakeholders
  • LO5. attain Dietitians Australia National Competency Standards for entry-level dietitians (DA 2021).

Graduate qualities

The graduate qualities are the qualities and skills that all University of Sydney graduates must demonstrate on successful completion of an award course. As a future Sydney graduate, the set of qualities have been designed to equip you for the contemporary world.

GQ1 Depth of disciplinary expertise

Deep disciplinary expertise is the ability to integrate and rigorously apply knowledge, understanding and skills of a recognised discipline defined by scholarly activity, as well as familiarity with evolving practice of the discipline.

GQ2 Critical thinking and problem solving

Critical thinking and problem solving are the questioning of ideas, evidence and assumptions in order to propose and evaluate hypotheses or alternative arguments before formulating a conclusion or a solution to an identified problem.

GQ3 Oral and written communication

Effective communication, in both oral and written form, is the clear exchange of meaning in a manner that is appropriate to audience and context.

GQ4 Information and digital literacy

Information and digital literacy is the ability to locate, interpret, evaluate, manage, adapt, integrate, create and convey information using appropriate resources, tools and strategies.

GQ5 Inventiveness

Generating novel ideas and solutions.

GQ6 Cultural competence

Cultural Competence is the ability to actively, ethically, respectfully, and successfully engage across and between cultures. In the Australian context, this includes and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, knowledge systems, and a mature understanding of contemporary issues.

GQ7 Interdisciplinary effectiveness

Interdisciplinary effectiveness is the integration and synthesis of multiple viewpoints and practices, working effectively across disciplinary boundaries.

GQ8 Integrated professional, ethical, and personal identity

An integrated professional, ethical and personal identity is understanding the interaction between one’s personal and professional selves in an ethical context.

GQ9 Influence

Engaging others in a process, idea or vision.

Outcome map

Learning outcomes Graduate qualities
GQ1 GQ2 GQ3 GQ4 GQ5 GQ6 GQ7 GQ8 GQ9

Alignment with Competency standards

Outcomes Competency standards
LO1
National Competency Standards for Dietitians in Australia (2021) - DAA
1. Domain 1. Professional Practice
1.1. Demonstrates safe practice
1.1.1. Operates within the individual’s and the profession’s scope of practice, seeks assistance and refers to other services as necessary
1.1.2. Shows a commitment to professional development and lifelong learning
1.1.3. Consistently demonstrates reflective practice in collaboration with supervisors, peers and mentors
1.1.4. Demonstrates professional conduct and accepts responsibility for own actions
1.1.5. Accepts responsibility for and manages, implements and evaluates own emotions, personal health and wellbeing
1.1.6. Demonstrates flexibility, adaptability and resilience
1.2. Demonstrates ethical and legal practice
1.2.1. Exercises professional duty of care in accordance with relevant codes of conduct, ethical requirements, and other accepted protocols
1.2.2. Demonstrates integrity, honesty and fairness
1.2.3. Prepares, stores and transmits accurate and timely documentation according to accepted standards
1.3. Demonstrates leadership
1.3.1. Uses negotiation and conflict-resolution skills when required
1.3.2. Develops and maintains a credible professional role by commitment to excellence of practice
1.3.3. Seeks, responds to and provides effective feedback
1.3.4. Participates in supervision, teaching and mentoring processes with peers, students and colleagues
1.3.5. Demonstrates initiative by being proactive and developing solutions to problems
1.3.6. Advocates for the contribution that nutrition and dietetics can make to improve health, and for the value dietitians bring to organisations and society
1.3.7. Identifies opportunities and advocates for change to the wider social, cultural and political environment to improve nutrition, food standards and the food system
1.3.8. Recognises that whole systems — including health and education — are responsible for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, and collaborates with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities to advocate for social justice and health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
1.4. Demonstrates management
1.4.1. Applies organisational, business and management skills in the practice of nutrition and dietetics
1.4.2. Utilises outcomes-based systems and tools to evaluate and assure quality of practice based on agreed goals, and revises practice accordingly
1.4.3. Identifies and assesses risks, incidents and errors, follows relevant protocols, and develops basic risk, incident and error management strategies for services
1.4.4. Utilises relevant technology and equipment efficiently, effectively and safely
1.5. Demonstrates cultural safety and responsiveness
1.5.1. Acknowledges, reflects on and understands own culture, values, beliefs, attitudes, biases, assumptions, privilege and power at the individual and systems level, and their influence on practice
1.5.2. Works respectfully with diverse clients in choosing culturally safe and responsive strategies to suit the goals, lived experiences and environment of clients
1.5.3. Applies evidence- and strengths-based best practice approaches in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, valuing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of knowing, being and doing
1.5.4. Acknowledge colonisation and systemic racism, social, cultural, behavioural, and economic factors which impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ health outcomes and how this might influence dietetic practice and outcomes
LO2
National Competency Standards for Dietitians in Australia (2021) - DAA
2. Domain 2. Expert Practice
2.1. Adopts an evidence-based approach to dietetic practice
2.1.1. Adopts a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of practice
2.1.2. Applies a highly developed knowledge of nutrition science, social science, behavioural science, health, disease, food, food preparation methods, food systems, and sustainability to tailor recommendations to improve health of clients
2.1.3. Systematically searches for, evaluates, interprets and applies findings from food, nutrition, dietetic, social, behavioural and education sciences into dietetic practice
2.1.4. Applies problem-solving skills to create realistic solutions to nutrition problems or issues
2.2. Applies the nutrition care process based on the expectations and priorities of clients
2.2.1. Collects, analyses and interprets relevant health, medical, cultural, social, psychological, economic, personal, environmental, dietary intake, and food systems and sustainability data when assessing nutritional issues of clients
2.2.2. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Makes appropriate nutrition diagnoses and identifies priority nutrition issues based on all available information
2.2.3. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Prioritises key issues, formulates goals and objectives, and prepares individualised, realistic goal- oriented plans
2.2.4. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Uses client-centred counselling skills to negotiate and facilitate nutrition, behaviour and lifestyle change and empower clients with self-management skills
2.2.5. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Systematically implements, evaluates and adapts nutrition care plans, programs and services
2.2.6. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Facilitates advanced-care planning, discharge planning and referral to other services where appropriate, in accordance with jurisdictional legislation, policy or standards
2.3. Influences food systems to improve the nutritional status of clients
2.3.1. Applies an approach to practice that recognises the multi-factorial and interconnected determinants influencing nutrition and health
2.3.2. Uses food legislation, regulations and standards to develop, implement and evaluate food systems and sustainability to maintain food safety
2.3.3. Applies a socio-ecological approach to the development of strategies to improve nutrition and health
LO3
National Competency Standards for Dietitians in Australia (2021) - DAA
3. Domain 3. Research Practice
3.1. Conducts research, evaluation, and quality-management processes
3.1.1. Identifies and selects appropriate research, evaluation and quality-management methods to advance the practice of dietetics
3.1.2. Applies ethical processes to research, evaluation, and quality management
3.1.3. Collects, analyses and interprets qualitative and quantitative research, evaluation, and quality-management data
3.1.4. Accurately documents and disseminates research, evaluation, and quality-management findings
3.1.5. Translates the implications of research findings for dietetic practice, advocacy and key stakeholders
LO4
National Competency Standards for Dietitians in Australia (2021) - DAA
4. Domain 4. Collaborative Practice
4.1. Communicates appropriately with people from various cultural, socioeconomic, organisational and professional backgrounds
4.1.1. Demonstrates empathy and establishes trust and rapport to build effective partnerships with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders and partners
4.1.2. Uses a range of communication methods to communicate clearly and concisely to a range of audiences, adapting or co-creating communication messages for specific audiences where appropriate
4.1.3. Engages in culturally appropriate, safe and sensitive communication that facilitates trust and the building of respectful relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
4.1.4. Translates technical information into practical messaging that can be easily understood and used by clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, partners, and members of the public
4.2. Builds capacity of and collaborates with others to improve nutrition and health outcomes
4.2.1. Shares information with and acts as a resource person for colleagues, community and other agencies
4.2.2. Identifies, builds partnerships with, and assists in implementing plans with key stakeholders who have the capacity to influence food intake and food systems
4.2.3. Displays effective active listening, interviewing and interpersonal skills to better understand perspectives of clients, other professionals, key stakeholders and partners to inform approaches and influence change
4.2.4. Applies the principles of marketing to promote healthy eating and influence dietary change
4.2.5. Empowers clients to improve their own health through engagement, facilitation, education and collaboration
4.3. Collaborates within and across teams effectively
4.3.1. Recognises and respects the diversity of other professionals’ roles, responsibilities and competencies
4.3.2. Participates in collaborative decision-making, shared responsibility, and shared vision within teams at an individual, organisational and systems level
4.3.3. Guides and supports team members and peers
LO5
National Competency Standards for Dietitians in Australia (2021) - DAA
1. Domain 1. Professional Practice
1.1. Demonstrates safe practice
1.1.1. Operates within the individual’s and the profession’s scope of practice, seeks assistance and refers to other services as necessary
1.1.2. Shows a commitment to professional development and lifelong learning
1.1.3. Consistently demonstrates reflective practice in collaboration with supervisors, peers and mentors
1.1.4. Demonstrates professional conduct and accepts responsibility for own actions
1.1.5. Accepts responsibility for and manages, implements and evaluates own emotions, personal health and wellbeing
1.1.6. Demonstrates flexibility, adaptability and resilience
1.2. Demonstrates ethical and legal practice
1.2.1. Exercises professional duty of care in accordance with relevant codes of conduct, ethical requirements, and other accepted protocols
1.2.2. Demonstrates integrity, honesty and fairness
1.2.3. Prepares, stores and transmits accurate and timely documentation according to accepted standards
1.3. Demonstrates leadership
1.3.1. Uses negotiation and conflict-resolution skills when required
1.3.2. Develops and maintains a credible professional role by commitment to excellence of practice
1.3.3. Seeks, responds to and provides effective feedback
1.3.4. Participates in supervision, teaching and mentoring processes with peers, students and colleagues
1.3.5. Demonstrates initiative by being proactive and developing solutions to problems
1.3.6. Advocates for the contribution that nutrition and dietetics can make to improve health, and for the value dietitians bring to organisations and society
1.3.7. Identifies opportunities and advocates for change to the wider social, cultural and political environment to improve nutrition, food standards and the food system
1.3.8. Recognises that whole systems — including health and education — are responsible for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, and collaborates with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities to advocate for social justice and health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
1.4. Demonstrates management
1.4.1. Applies organisational, business and management skills in the practice of nutrition and dietetics
1.4.2. Utilises outcomes-based systems and tools to evaluate and assure quality of practice based on agreed goals, and revises practice accordingly
1.4.3. Identifies and assesses risks, incidents and errors, follows relevant protocols, and develops basic risk, incident and error management strategies for services
1.4.4. Utilises relevant technology and equipment efficiently, effectively and safely
1.5. Demonstrates cultural safety and responsiveness
1.5.1. Acknowledges, reflects on and understands own culture, values, beliefs, attitudes, biases, assumptions, privilege and power at the individual and systems level, and their influence on practice
1.5.2. Works respectfully with diverse clients in choosing culturally safe and responsive strategies to suit the goals, lived experiences and environment of clients
1.5.3. Applies evidence- and strengths-based best practice approaches in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, valuing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of knowing, being and doing
1.5.4. Acknowledge colonisation and systemic racism, social, cultural, behavioural, and economic factors which impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ health outcomes and how this might influence dietetic practice and outcomes
2. Domain 2. Expert Practice
2.1. Adopts an evidence-based approach to dietetic practice
2.1.1. Adopts a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of practice
2.1.2. Applies a highly developed knowledge of nutrition science, social science, behavioural science, health, disease, food, food preparation methods, food systems, and sustainability to tailor recommendations to improve health of clients
2.1.3. Systematically searches for, evaluates, interprets and applies findings from food, nutrition, dietetic, social, behavioural and education sciences into dietetic practice
2.1.4. Applies problem-solving skills to create realistic solutions to nutrition problems or issues
2.2. Applies the nutrition care process based on the expectations and priorities of clients
2.2.1. Collects, analyses and interprets relevant health, medical, cultural, social, psychological, economic, personal, environmental, dietary intake, and food systems and sustainability data when assessing nutritional issues of clients
2.2.2. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Makes appropriate nutrition diagnoses and identifies priority nutrition issues based on all available information
2.2.3. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Prioritises key issues, formulates goals and objectives, and prepares individualised, realistic goal- oriented plans
2.2.4. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Uses client-centred counselling skills to negotiate and facilitate nutrition, behaviour and lifestyle change and empower clients with self-management skills
2.2.5. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Systematically implements, evaluates and adapts nutrition care plans, programs and services
2.2.6. In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Facilitates advanced-care planning, discharge planning and referral to other services where appropriate, in accordance with jurisdictional legislation, policy or standards
2.3. Influences food systems to improve the nutritional status of clients
2.3.1. Applies an approach to practice that recognises the multi-factorial and interconnected determinants influencing nutrition and health
2.3.2. Uses food legislation, regulations and standards to develop, implement and evaluate food systems and sustainability to maintain food safety
2.3.3. Applies a socio-ecological approach to the development of strategies to improve nutrition and health
3. Domain 3. Research Practice
3.1. Conducts research, evaluation, and quality-management processes
3.1.1. Identifies and selects appropriate research, evaluation and quality-management methods to advance the practice of dietetics
3.1.2. Applies ethical processes to research, evaluation, and quality management
3.1.3. Collects, analyses and interprets qualitative and quantitative research, evaluation, and quality-management data
3.1.4. Accurately documents and disseminates research, evaluation, and quality-management findings
3.1.5. Translates the implications of research findings for dietetic practice, advocacy and key stakeholders
4. Domain 4. Collaborative Practice
4.1. Communicates appropriately with people from various cultural, socioeconomic, organisational and professional backgrounds
4.1.1. Demonstrates empathy and establishes trust and rapport to build effective partnerships with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders and partners
4.1.2. Uses a range of communication methods to communicate clearly and concisely to a range of audiences, adapting or co-creating communication messages for specific audiences where appropriate
4.1.3. Engages in culturally appropriate, safe and sensitive communication that facilitates trust and the building of respectful relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
4.1.4. Translates technical information into practical messaging that can be easily understood and used by clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, partners, and members of the public
4.2. Builds capacity of and collaborates with others to improve nutrition and health outcomes
4.2.1. Shares information with and acts as a resource person for colleagues, community and other agencies
4.2.2. Identifies, builds partnerships with, and assists in implementing plans with key stakeholders who have the capacity to influence food intake and food systems
4.2.3. Displays effective active listening, interviewing and interpersonal skills to better understand perspectives of clients, other professionals, key stakeholders and partners to inform approaches and influence change
4.2.4. Applies the principles of marketing to promote healthy eating and influence dietary change
4.2.5. Empowers clients to improve their own health through engagement, facilitation, education and collaboration
4.3. Collaborates within and across teams effectively
4.3.1. Recognises and respects the diversity of other professionals’ roles, responsibilities and competencies
4.3.2. Participates in collaborative decision-making, shared responsibility, and shared vision within teams at an individual, organisational and systems level
4.3.3. Guides and supports team members and peers
National Competency Standards for Dietitians in Australia (2021) -
Competency code Taught, Practiced or Assessed Competency standard
1.1.1 A Operates within the individual’s and the profession’s scope of practice, seeks assistance and refers to other services as necessary
1.1.2 A Shows a commitment to professional development and lifelong learning
1.1.3 A Consistently demonstrates reflective practice in collaboration with supervisors, peers and mentors
1.1.4 A Demonstrates professional conduct and accepts responsibility for own actions
1.1.5 A Accepts responsibility for and manages, implements and evaluates own emotions, personal health and wellbeing
1.1.6 A Demonstrates flexibility, adaptability and resilience
1.2.1 A Exercises professional duty of care in accordance with relevant codes of conduct, ethical requirements, and other accepted protocols
1.2.2 A Demonstrates integrity, honesty and fairness
1.2.3 A Prepares, stores and transmits accurate and timely documentation according to accepted standards
1.3.1 A Uses negotiation and conflict-resolution skills when required
1.3.2 A Develops and maintains a credible professional role by commitment to excellence of practice
1.3.3 A Seeks, responds to and provides effective feedback
1.3.4 A Participates in supervision, teaching and mentoring processes with peers, students and colleagues
1.3.5 A Demonstrates initiative by being proactive and developing solutions to problems
1.3.6 P A Advocates for the contribution that nutrition and dietetics can make to improve health, and for the value dietitians bring to organisations and society
1.3.7 A Identifies opportunities and advocates for change to the wider social, cultural and political environment to improve nutrition, food standards and the food system
1.3.8 A Recognises that whole systems — including health and education — are responsible for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, and collaborates with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and communities to advocate for social justice and health equity for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
1.4.1 A Applies organisational, business and management skills in the practice of nutrition and dietetics
1.4.2 A Utilises outcomes-based systems and tools to evaluate and assure quality of practice based on agreed goals, and revises practice accordingly
1.4.3 A Identifies and assesses risks, incidents and errors, follows relevant protocols, and develops basic risk, incident and error management strategies for services
1.4.4 P A Utilises relevant technology and equipment efficiently, effectively and safely
1.5.1 A Acknowledges, reflects on and understands own culture, values, beliefs, attitudes, biases, assumptions, privilege and power at the individual and systems level, and their influence on practice
1.5.2 A Works respectfully with diverse clients in choosing culturally safe and responsive strategies to suit the goals, lived experiences and environment of clients
1.5.3 A Applies evidence- and strengths-based best practice approaches in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care, valuing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of knowing, being and doing
1.5.4 A Acknowledge colonisation and systemic racism, social, cultural, behavioural, and economic factors which impact Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ health outcomes and how this might influence dietetic practice and outcomes
2.1.1 A Adopts a questioning and critical approach in all aspects of practice
2.1.2 A Applies a highly developed knowledge of nutrition science, social science, behavioural science, health, disease, food, food preparation methods, food systems, and sustainability to tailor recommendations to improve health of clients
2.1.3 A Systematically searches for, evaluates, interprets and applies findings from food, nutrition, dietetic, social, behavioural and education sciences into dietetic practice
2.1.4 P A Applies problem-solving skills to create realistic solutions to nutrition problems or issues
2.2.1 P A Collects, analyses and interprets relevant health, medical, cultural, social, psychological, economic, personal, environmental, dietary intake, and food systems and sustainability data when assessing nutritional issues of clients
2.2.2 P A In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Makes appropriate nutrition diagnoses and identifies priority nutrition issues based on all available information
2.2.3 P A In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Prioritises key issues, formulates goals and objectives, and prepares individualised, realistic goal- oriented plans
2.2.4 A In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Uses client-centred counselling skills to negotiate and facilitate nutrition, behaviour and lifestyle change and empower clients with self-management skills
2.2.5 A In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Systematically implements, evaluates and adapts nutrition care plans, programs and services
2.2.6 A In collaboration with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, and partners: Facilitates advanced-care planning, discharge planning and referral to other services where appropriate, in accordance with jurisdictional legislation, policy or standards
2.3.1 P A Applies an approach to practice that recognises the multi-factorial and interconnected determinants influencing nutrition and health
2.3.2 A Uses food legislation, regulations and standards to develop, implement and evaluate food systems and sustainability to maintain food safety
2.3.3 A Applies a socio-ecological approach to the development of strategies to improve nutrition and health
3.1.1 A Identifies and selects appropriate research, evaluation and quality-management methods to advance the practice of dietetics
3.1.2 A Applies ethical processes to research, evaluation, and quality management
3.1.3 A Collects, analyses and interprets qualitative and quantitative research, evaluation, and quality-management data
3.1.4 A Accurately documents and disseminates research, evaluation, and quality-management findings
3.1.5 A Translates the implications of research findings for dietetic practice, advocacy and key stakeholders
4.1.1 A Demonstrates empathy and establishes trust and rapport to build effective partnerships with clients, other professionals, key stakeholders and partners
4.1.2 A Uses a range of communication methods to communicate clearly and concisely to a range of audiences, adapting or co-creating communication messages for specific audiences where appropriate
4.1.3 A Engages in culturally appropriate, safe and sensitive communication that facilitates trust and the building of respectful relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples
4.1.4 A Translates technical information into practical messaging that can be easily understood and used by clients, other professionals, key stakeholders, partners, and members of the public
4.2.1 A Shares information with and acts as a resource person for colleagues, community and other agencies
4.2.2 A Identifies, builds partnerships with, and assists in implementing plans with key stakeholders who have the capacity to influence food intake and food systems
4.2.3 A Displays effective active listening, interviewing and interpersonal skills to better understand perspectives of clients, other professionals, key stakeholders and partners to inform approaches and influence change
4.2.4 A Applies the principles of marketing to promote healthy eating and influence dietary change
4.2.5 A Empowers clients to improve their own health through engagement, facilitation, education and collaboration
4.3.1 A Recognises and respects the diversity of other professionals’ roles, responsibilities and competencies
4.3.2 A Participates in collaborative decision-making, shared responsibility, and shared vision within teams at an individual, organisational and systems level
4.3.3 A Guides and supports team members and peers

This section outlines changes made to this unit following staff and student reviews.

Incorporation of additional observational opportunities is being investigated.

Site visit guidelines

Guidelines will be provided as required.

Work, health and safety

All students are required to obtain relevant immunisations, Australian police check and working with children check as well as meet the Univeristy of Sydney’s Fitness to Practice requirements.

Disclaimer

The University reserves the right to amend units of study or no longer offer certain units, including where there are low enrolment numbers.

To help you understand common terms that we use at the University, we offer an online glossary.