Skip to main content

SSEAC Webinar Series - Economic and Social Development

Join us on Thursdays in 2021 for a special webinar series dedicated to Southeast Asia.
From engineers, lawyers and sociologists to epidemiologists, geologists and historians, SSEAC is home to over 400 University of Sydney academics who specialise in Southeast Asia. This year, we’re proud to bring you the best and brightest of these scholars in a special webinar series designed to showcase the University of Sydney’s research excellence across the region. Featuring four of our top scholars, the series will conclude with a focus on Economic and Social Development.
Event_

Strategic Planning in Agriculture: Insights from Southeast Asian Experiences

Thursday 14 October, 7am CET / 2pm SGT / 5pm AET

Join Associate Professor Tiho Ancev and his collaborator Ms Chi Nguyen to consider some of the directions that strategic planning in agriculture in Southeast Asia should take in the future.
Event_

Eco-Justice for Harm from International Development

Thursday 28 October, 7am CET / 2pm SGT / 5pm AET

Join Professor Susan Park for a thought-provoking discussion of global governance mechanisms and how they can impact eco-justice delivery to communities who have experienced environmental harm from international development projects.

About the speakers

Associate Professor Tiho Ancev is an applied economist in the School of Economics, University of Sydney, with expertise in the fields of agricultural, environmental, and natural resource economics. He is the SSEAC Country Coordinator for Vietnam. Tiho is Managing Editor-in-Chief of The Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

Tiho’s contributions have been in water economics and policy, and economics of air pollution and climate change policies. He has published widely on these topics (Journal of Regulatory Economics, Ecological Economics, Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Water Resources Management). Tiho has also led and contributed to several national and international projects in these research areas.

Susan Park is a Professor of Global Governance at the University of Sydney. Susan has a long-standing commitment to Global Environmental Politics.

Susan has two current research projects. The first looks at the global governance of the shift to renewable energy, particularly ‘gaps’ in governance around the lack of protective norms, and accountability ‘traps’ that emerge when we focus our attention of a few scheme to mitigate harm in global renewable supply chains. The second, examines if and how international grievance mechanisms operate to provide justice for communities harmed by international energy and development projects funded by international development agencies.

Dr Sandra Seno-Alday is a Lecturer at the University of Sydney Business School, where she is the Director of the program for high achieving students. Extending her experience in strategy and organization development consulting, her scholarly and industry research explore global dynamics, international business governance, risk and sustainability.

Prior to embarking on an academic career, Sandra was a consultant to a wide range of medium- to large-scale companies, specialising in international business development and organisation development. In the area of international business development, her consulting engagements were mainly aimed at informing clients’ strategic business expansion efforts in Southeast Asia, and included risk assessments, market attractiveness studies, competitive analyses and business feasibility analyses. In the area of organisation development, Sandra’s consulting engagements focused on helping companies design their organisation structure and processes, and put in place human resource management systems aimed at supporting the delivery of overall corporate strategies.

Sandra is also a member of the SSEAC Executive Committee.

 

Dr Russell Toth is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Economics at the University of Sydney. He is a development microeconomist, with main research interests in the development of the private sector, and occasional overlap with agricultural, behavioural, and environmental economics. His research often involves primary data collection, with a focus on field sites in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, including Fiji, Indonesia, Myanmar, and Vietnam. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Cornell University.