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Overview

In response to COVID-19, the University of Sydney has reviewed the availability of courses to be delivered remotely for students commencing their studies in Semester 1, 2021.

This course will be available to study remotely for students commencing in Semester 1, 2021. Please note that some units of study that are not essential to completing the degree may not be available to be studied remotely.

Note: The University intends to offer as many units of study as possible in a remote as well as face-to-face learning method of delivery in Semester 1, 2021 and subject to ongoing border closures and public health orders impacting attendance on campus, in Semester 2, 2021. However, some units of study and courses require students to study in-person at the relevant University of Sydney campus/es and host locations for placements and will not be available remotely. 

About this course

The Master of Heritage Conservation allows you to develop specific skills in assessment, interpretation, management, formulation of policy, and documentation of culturally significant places "including buildings, sites and cultural landscapes. You will be introduced to methods and practices of conservation, designing and building new buildings in old settings, and the history, theory, law and policy of this unique area. 

This exciting field of study is much more than just the simple preservation of existing buildings. Instead, by engaging with history, your role is to provide value to building owners, visitors and cultural bodies, all of which have a shared interest in understanding, adapting and preserving our heritage.

Heritage Conservation teaches you the techniques, approaches and methodologies required to work as a heritage consultant in policy development, regulation enforcement or as a cultural historian and commentator. Through this program you will understand the social value and embedded capital of significant sites and determine what should be preserved for future generations. Your degree in Heritage Conservation allows you to draw on our School’s extensive history in this profession, being the first university in the Asia-Pacific region to offer a program in Heritage Conservation.

This program combines the technical and aesthetic principles of architecture and architectural history with the social value of our past. You will be educated in the use of new and old material, alteration design, additions and modifications to existing buildings, and the sustainable, ethical and equitable development of sites in light of its past uses. Your core program emphasises the skills required for work with valuable heritage sites. These skills include the assessment, interpretation, management, documentation and formation of policy for culturally significant places, including buildings, sites and cultural landscapes. These core skills are taught by focusing on the duality of historic buildings their construction (in terms of design and materials) and significance (culturally, historically, economically and socially). From this dual understanding, you will be trained to develop policy that reflects the importance of all aspects of a significant building.

Students enrolled in this course may be eligible for membership of the Environment Institute of Australian and New Zealand (EIANZ).

Commonwealth Supported Places

Commonwealth Supported Places (CSP) are available for postgraduate study for eligible domestic students. This means that your course fees are subsidised by the Australian Government and you pay a student contribution amount (SCA). CSPs are limited in number and are allocated based on academic merit.

Subject areas
Shared pool

Entry, fees, funding & how to apply

Depends on your qualification, citizenship status
The details on this page based on your selections are a guide only, and are subject to change.

Your entry requirements

English language proficiency

Find out if you need to prove English language proficiency (depends on your country of origin and educational background).

For academic requirements check the ‘Admission requirements’ section on this page.

Your fee

How to apply

You can apply online via the application portal. When you are ready to apply, select the ‘Apply’ button on this course page. Visit the How to apply page for other important information. 

Standard closing dates:

Semester 1 - 11 February of the commencing year

Semester 2 - 15 July of the commencing year

We strongly encourage applicants to apply as early as possible, offers are made on a rolling basis and places are limited. Separate scholarship deadlines apply - check the scholarships website for details.

Starting date

Semester 1 (March) and Semester 2 (August)

You can apply online via the application portal. When you are ready to apply, select the ‘Apply’ button on this course page. Visit the How to apply page for other important information. 

Standard closing dates:

Semester 1 - 31 January of the commencing year

Semester 2 - 30 June of the commencing year

We strongly encourage international applicants to apply as early as possible to allow time for visa and travel arrangements. Separate scholarship deadlines may apply - check the scholarships website for details.

Starting date

Semester 1 (March) and Semester 2 (August)

What you'll study

Year 1
Unit Code     Unit of Study                                          Sem    CP
ARCH9074 Principles of Heritage Conservation 1 6
ARCH9082
Conservation of Traditional Materials
1 6
MARC4201
Modern Architectural History 1 6
  Elective 1 6
ARCH9028 Conservation Methods and Practices 2 12
EARCH9081
Heritage Law and Policy
2 6
ARCH9084 Conservation Design Studio 2 6

 

Year 2

Unit Code     Unit of Study                                          Sem    CP
ARCH9074 New Design in Old Settings 1 6
ARCH9031 Research Report 1 12
  Elective 1 6

 

Candidates for the Master of Heritage Conservation complete 72 credit points (cp) made up of at least five core units of study (42cp), three optional units from the list offered by the course (18cp), and two elective units (12cp) from those available within the faculty, subject to meeting prior learning requirements and timetabling. Areas of study include history and theory of conservation, conservation methods and practices and new design in old settings.

Units of Study

Admission requirement

A successful applicant for admission to the Master of Heritage Conservation will have completed a bachelor's degree with a credit average.

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate with a WAM of 70 or higher are able to apply to to continue into the Master in Architectural Science in the same course stream.

Masters and Diploma students may also opt to graduate with a lower level of certification once the required units are complete.

Please note that students may commence studies in Semester 2, however some courses are only available in part-time capacity due to the units on offer.

Career Pathways

Heritage consultants skills are in demand by government and cultural agencies, development firms, historical societies and architectural and urban planning firms. Graduates may also be employed as social commentators, historians or cultural observers. The dual focus of this program building design and policy formation equips you to enter either area, and there are an increasing number of opportunities with government and councils to work on conservation projects within their electorates. 

The approaches taught in this program are recognised internationally, and our internationally-focused approach to conservation education makes your skills readily transferrable to other countries. 

There is increasing demand for specialist skills in this area. Many graduates develop a niche specialisation (in a particular era or style of architecture, or in geographic contexts) in their professional practice. 

The increasing complexity of government regulations `red tape’ - for new project developments presents an opportunity for skilled heritage consultants to work alongside regulators and design teams to help navigate the complexities of significant sites.

The world is changing, and university education needs to change too

Domestic students

International students

To help you understand common terms that we use at the University, we offer an online glossary.