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Unit of study_

SCLG1002: Introduction to Sociology 2

In a rapidly changing world, how do we make sense of current social and political problems effectively? By exploring sociological concepts in creative ways, this unit gives students the tools to analyse, research and respond to real world issues such as globalisation, crime, social justice, community breakdown, and racial, sexual and indigenous inequality.

Code SCLG1002
Academic unit Sociology and Criminology
Credit points 6
Prerequisites:
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None
Corequisites:
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None
Prohibitions:
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None

At the completion of this unit, you should be able to:

  • LO1. understand a range of existing fields of sociological theory and research, and develop skills to expand knowledge and understanding about social life. In particular, you will: become acquainted with the basic concepts and methods of sociological inquiry and how to apply these in developing your own understanding of the societies in which you live; be able to acquire and evaluate new knowledge through independent research; be able to identify, define, investigate, and solve problems; think independently, analytically and creatively; and exercise critical judgement and critical thinking to create new modes of understanding.
  • LO2. find and use information effectively in a variety of contexts. In particular, you will: i. recognize what types of information you require for particular purposes; ii. become acquainted with the basic concepts and methods sociological enquiry and how to apply these in developing your own understanding of the society in which you live; iii. be able to use academic and non-academic information resources, with a particular focus on how to access both open and proprietary web interfaces; and iv. use information effectively in critical and creative thinking.
  • LO3. learn how to work independently and sustainably, in a way that is informed by openness, curiosity and a desire to meet new challenges. You will: i. become an independent learner who takes responsibility for your own learning; ii.set appropriate goals for ongoing intellectual and professional development, and evaluate your own performance effectively; iii. be intellectually curious, open to new ideas, methods and ways of thinking, and able to sustain intellectual interest; iv. respond effectively to unfamiliar problems in unfamiliar contexts; and v. work effectively in teams and other collaborative contexts.
  • LO4. develop personal values and beliefs consistent with your role as responsible members of local, national, international and professional communities. You will: i. understand and practise the highest standards of ethical behaviour associated with the discipline; ii. be informed and open-minded about social, cultural and linguistic diversity in Australia and the world; iii. appreciate your ethical responsibilities towards colleagues, research subjects, the wider community, and the environment; and iv. be aware that knowledge is not value-free.
  • LO5. develop the capacity to recognise and value communication as a tool for negotiating and creating new understanding, interacting with others, and furthering your own learning. You will: i. develop your written, oral, and multimedia communication skills in a variety of learning tasks; ii. recognise the importance of continuing to develop your oral, visual, and written communication skills; and iii. be able to use appropriate communication technologies.