Science

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline.
 

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Prerequisites have changed for the following unit. They now read:

HPSC3108 Hist and Phil of the Physical Sciences P: HPSC1X01 or HPSC2X01

24/3/2021
Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Science
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
AGRI2001
Plant Management in Agroecosystems
6    A Understanding of experimental design and analysis including dependent and independent variables, random and representative sampling, t-tests a simple designs and interpretation of univariate analysis.
N AGRO3004
Semester 1
BIOL2021
Zoology
6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX
N BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912
Semester 1
BIOL2024
Ecology and Conservation
6    A BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX
N BIOL2924
Semester 2
BIOL2030
Botany
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6.
N BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or BIOL2930
Semester 1
BIOL2031
Plants and Environment
6    A Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6.
N AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931
Semester 2
BIOL2032
Australian Wildlife Biology
6    N ANSC2005
Semester 2
BIOL2033
Entomology
6    N ENTO2001
Semester 2
ENSC2001
Environmental Monitoring
6    A Understanding of scientific principles and concepts including biodiversity, human impacts on the environment, properties of substances (e.g., acidity, alkalinity, solvents) and basic knowledge of statistics.
N AGCH3033
Semester 1
ENVI3111
Environmental Law and Ethics
6    P 12 credit points of 2000-level units of study
N ENVI3911
Semester 1
ENVI3114
Energy and the Environment
6    A Junior Physics units or Intermediate Environmental Science units
P 12 credit points of 2000-level units
N ENVI3001 or PHYS3600
Semester 2
GEGE2001
Genetics and Genomics
6    A Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression.
N GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072
Semester 2
GEOS2111
Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach
6    P 6 credit points of 1000-level units from (GEOS1XXX or GEOL1XXX)
N GEOS2911


Staff will organize a non-compulsory half-day weekend field excursion to explore local Sydney hazards for interested students.
Semester 1
GEOS2115
Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change
6    A GEOG1001 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501
P GEOL1501 or GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X02 or GEOS1X03 or BIOL1XXX or ENVI1003
N GEOS2915
Semester 1
GEOS2116
Earth Surface Processes
6    N GEOS2916 or GEOG2321
Semester 2
GEOS2121
Environmental and Resource Management
6    P GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X02 or ECOP1X01
N GEOS2921
Semester 2
GEOS3009
Coastal Environments and Processes
6    P 12 cp from (GEOS2X11 or GEOS2X15 or GEOS2X16 or GEOS2X21 or BIOL2022)
N GEOS3909 or MARS3003 or MARS3105
Semester 1
GEOS3014
GIS in Coastal Management
6    P Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]
N GEOS3914
Semester 2
GEOS3053
Asia-Pacific Field School

This unit of study is not available in 2021

6    P 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography.
N GEOG3201 or GEOS3953

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
Intensive February
GEOS3333
Geographical Concepts, Skills and Methods

This unit of study is not available in 2021

6    A Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software.
P 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study, including 6 credit points from following (GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 or GEOS2123 or GEOS2923 or GEOS2115 or GEOS2915 or GEOS2121 or GEOS2921 or SOIL2002 or LWSC2002)
N GEOS3933
Semester 2
GEOS3520
Urban Citizenship and Sustainability
6    P GEOS2X21 or GEOS2X23 or GOES2X15 or GEOS2X11 or LWSC2002
N GEOS3920
Semester 1
GEOS3524
Global Development and Livelihoods
6    P GEOX2X21 or AREC2005 or GOVT2228 or GEOS2X11 or GEOS2X23 or GEOS2X16
N GEOS3924 or GEOS2112 or GEOS2912
Semester 1
HPSC2011
Science, Ethics and Society
6    A Students should be familiar will introductory material in Philosophy of Science, Ethics or Sociology.
N HPSC3107
Semester 2
HPSC2901
What Is This Thing Called Science? (Adv)

This unit of study is not available in 2021

6    P 24 credit points of Junior study with a Distinction average
N HPSC2101 or HPSC1001 or HPSC1901

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
HPSC3002
Hist and Phil of the Biomedical Sciences
6    P (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC2101 or HPSC2901)
Semester 2
HPSC3016
The Scientific Revolution
6    P (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC1001 or HPSC1901 or HPSC2101 or HPSC2901)
Semester 2
HPSC3023
Psychology and Psychiatry: History and Phil
6    P (12 credit points of HPSC2XXX OR 12 credit points of PSYC2XXX) OR (6 credit points of HPSC2XXX AND 6 credit points of PSYC2XXX)
Semester 1
HPSC3108
Hist and Phil of the Physical Sciences
6    P HPSC2101 or HPSC2901
Semester 1
MATH2969
Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2021

6    P 9 credit points of Junior Mathematics (advanced level or Credit at the normal level)
N MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2069
Semester 1
MATH2988
Number Theory and Cryptography Adv
6    P MATH1902 or MATH1904 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002 or MATH1004 or MATH1064)
N MATH2068 or MATH2088
Semester 2
MATH3061
Geometry and Topology
6    A Theory and methods of linear transformations and vector spaces, for example MATH2061, MATH2961 or MATH2022
P 12 credit points of MATH2XXX
N MATH3001 or MATH3006
Semester 2
MICR2031
Microbiology
6    A Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1
N MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931
Semester 1
QBIO2001
Molecular Systems Biology
6    A Basic concepts in metabolism; protein synthesis; gene regulation; quantitative and statistical skills
Semester 1
SOIL2005
Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems
6    N SOIL2003 or LWSC2002
Semester 1
SRSU3601
Data Driven Discovery

This unit of study is not available in 2021

6    A Upper-level disciplinary knowledge

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
STAT2011
Probability and Estimation Theory
6    P (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (DATA1X01 or MATH10X5 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020)
N STAT2911
Semester 1

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Science
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
AGRI2001 Plant Management in Agroecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGRO3004 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of experimental design and analysis including dependent and independent variables, random and representative sampling, t-tests a simple designs and interpretation of univariate analysis. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
World population is projected to reach 9 billion within 50 years and food production needs to double in a sustainable manner in order to feed human population. This profound challenge will be met by improving our knowledge and management of agroecosystems. This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of the biology and management of plants in dryland agroecosystems, with a focus on major Australian broad acre crops. Dryland agroecosystems can be defined as ecosystems modified for the purpose of producing crops, pastures and animals in environments where water limits productivity during part of the year (and are typical in Australian agriculture). These agroecosystems are characterised by regular agricultural interventions, such as cultivation, sowing, nutrient, weed, pest and disease management, and harvest. The program will involve developing an understanding of the interactions between the environment, crops/pastures and agricultural management in dryland agroecosystems. The model for describing and analysing agroecosystems will be centred on a typical cropping cycle, with an emphasis on cereals. You will gain knowledge and skills on crop physiological, growth and development responses to the combined climatic, edaphic, biotic and management factors in the growing environment. The unit will also provide a sound understanding and analysis of the practical farming framework in which this knowledge is applied through weed, disease and pest management, approaches to managing climate variability and precision agriculture. There will be a focus on assessing the effects of climate and weather in dryland agroecosystems, especially on understanding crop-water-nutrition relationships. Successful students will be able to appreciate and analyse the most important limitations to crop production and yield in Australia and how those limitations can be minimized or overcome through science-based planning and agronomic management practices.
Textbooks
Pratley J (Ed.) (2003) Principles of Field Crop Production. 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Melbourne, Australia. Marschner P (Ed) (2012) Marschner's Mineral Nutrition of Higher Plants, 3rd edition. Elsevier, London Anderson WK, Garlinge JR (Eds) (2000) The Wheat Book. Department of Agriculture Western Australia: South Perth, Australia. Whelan, B.M., Taylor, J.A. (2013) Precision Agriculture for Grain Production Systems. CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia. Pearson CJ, Ison RL (1998) Agronomy of Grassland Systems. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, New York, Melbourne.
BIOL2021 Zoology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL2921 or BIOL2011 or BIOL2911 or BIOL2012 or BIOL2912 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of the functional and phylogenetic diversity of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The material is presented within the conceptual framework of evolution, the foundation of biology. Lectures explore the diversity of major functional systems and behaviour in the context of environmental challenges and the ecological roles of different animal groups. Laboratory classes include dissections and demonstrations of the functional anatomy of invertebrates and vertebrates, as well as experiments. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended reading: Hickman, C.P., Keen, S.L., Larson, A., Eisenhour, D.J., I'Anson, H. and Roberts, L.S. (2017) Integrated Principles of Zoology 17th ed. (McGraw Hill, New York)
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 4th edition (2014). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
BIOL2030 Botany

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BIOL2023 or BIOL2923 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or PLNT2002 or PLNT2902 or PLNT2003 or PLNT2903 or BIOL2930 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are surrounded by plants, and rely on them every day for our wellbeing. Ecologists use botanical knowledge to help manage marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and public health and land management professionals depend on their understanding of plant science to help solve environmental problems and to enhance biosecurity. Botany aims to increase and improve our supply of medicines, foods, and other plant products, and is critical for anyone interested in contributing to the sustainable future of our planet. In this unit, you will explore the origins, diversity, and global significance of plants. You will gain insights into the micro- and macro-evolutionary processes and patterns behind how plants moved from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems. Integrated lectures, practical classes, and extensive online resources will allow you to develop and integrate practical skills and conceptual frame works in plant identification, plant physiology, plant anatomy, and plant morphology. Successful completion of Botany will allow you to contribute to a range of disciplines including: ecology, bioinformatics, molecular and cell biology, genetics and biotechnology, environmental law, agriculture, education and the arts.
Textbooks
Evert RF and Eichhorn SE. 2013. Raven: Biology of Plants. 8th Ed. Freeman and Co Publishers. New York. NY.
BIOL2031 Plants and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGEN2005 or BIOL3043 or BIOL3943 or BIOL2931 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and skills in BIOL1XX6. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Plants grow across a range of environments, influencing form, function and ultimately reproductive success. Being sessile, plants lack the luxury of seeking an alternative 'stress-free lifestyle' and therefore rely on genetic and physical adaptations to survive and reproduce. To understand how a plant can achieve such flexibility requires knowledge of plant structure and the influence of environmental drivers on plant growth and function. In this unit, you will examine the physiological processes controlling plant growth and reproduction linked to environmental constraints. You will understand the relationship between tissue and cellular structure and their underlying role in physiological and metabolic activities, particularly processes involving light capture, photosynthesis, water regulation, nutrient management and metabolite redistribution. Lectures and interactive practicals will together introduce you to plant processes that underpin life on earth. Experimentation and analysis of plant physiological processes will develop a skill base that will lead to a greater understanding and appreciation of common plant processes. As a component of the Plant Science minor and the Plant Production major, BIOL2031 will provide an important platform to extend your interests in plant science and plant related fields across the curriculum.
Textbooks
Taiz, L. and Zeiger, E. (2010) Plant Physiology, Fifth Edition. Sinauer Associates. Sunderland, MA.
BIOL2032 Australian Wildlife Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ANSC2005 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia is home to a broad diversity of vertebrate wildlife species, many of which are unique to the Australian environment, having evolved in isolation from other large land-masses for millions of years. This unit examines the diversity of Australian reptiles, amphibians, birds and mammals (including all three mammalian lineages; monotremes, marsupials and eutherian mammals). We focus on the unique anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations that have enabled our wildlife to survive and thrive within varied Australian ecosystems. We also examine how the uniqueness of our wildlife is also one of its greatest challenges, being naive to the new threats that are present in our rapidly changing environments. At the end of this unit you should have an appreciation of the diversity and uniqueness of Australian wildlife; be able to determine the links between form and function in wildlife and understand the significance of these functional adaptations in relation to ecological challenges. You will also have an understanding of the interactions between humans and wildlife, and how the unique characteristics of our wildlife also make them vulnerable to threats within the rapidly changing Australian environment. Students will also develop enhanced scientific literacy and communication skills through tutorial activities and assessment tasks.
Textbooks
No text book requirements. Recommended reading throughout semester provided by each lecture relevant to their class content. Relevant scientific papers will be uploaded to LMS
BIOL2033 Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ENTO2001 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Insects are the most abundant and diverse group of animals on earth; beetles alone account for 25% of animal life. Insects impact almost every facet of the ecosystem and our lives. Many insects play valuable and essential roles in pollinating different plant species, in predating and controlling insect pests and in recycling nutrients. Other insects are harmful and are the vectors for major diseases such as plague, malaria and recently emerged viral disease Zika. This unit will provide students with a broad introduction to entomology including insect evolution, ecology, anatomy and physiology. Students will learn applied entomological topics such as sustainable insect management in agricultural ecosystems, medical and veterinary entomology, insect-inspired technologies, and insects as a future food source for both livestock and humans. This theoretical background will be complemented by training in how to use and evaluate a range of identification tools such as lucid and traditional dichotomous keys that enable you to identify and classify major groups of insects. Practical classes will allow you to develop your identification, classification and preservation skills though examination of boxes of 'mystery insects' and through creating a museum-quality insect collection. Students will also learn procedures for caring and rearing live insects. By the end of the unit you will be well prepared to work in fields that require entomological skills.
Textbooks
Info will be made available via Canvas. Keys will be available in practical classes and in the lab manual.
ENSC2001 Environmental Monitoring

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AGCH3033 Assumed knowledge: Understanding of scientific principles and concepts including biodiversity, human impacts on the environment, properties of substances (e.g., acidity, alkalinity, solvents) and basic knowledge of statistics. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Two half-day field trips Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Human population growth is causing irreversible change to almost all environments on earth. The extent of human change has been so great that a new geological epoch, the anthropocene, has been defined. Global warming, the introduction of pollutants and excessive use of nutrients are stressors affecting the biodiversity and resilience of ecosystems, and pose threats to human and environmental health. These human impacts carefully need to be monitored to guide appropriate management of urban, natural and agricultural systems. In this unit you will learn about transport pathways of pollutants, bioaccumulation, environmental toxicology (e.g., LD50 values), environmental monitoring and remediation techniques. Through lectures, laboratories and group work, concepts and methods of environmental monitoring will be illustrated and discussed including findings from the latest research. You will participate in structured practical exercises and field trips where you will apply sampling techniques, use bio-indicators and diversity indices to monitor ecosystem functioning. You will interpret the results and assess what the implications are for the ecological functioning and sustainable management of the environment. These hands-on exercises will be complemented with case-studies to guide you in critically analysing and evaluating environmental monitoring data. By taking this unit, you will acquire the necessary skills and knowledge in monitoring sites impacted by human activity.
Textbooks
Artiola, Pepper, and Brusseau. 2004. Environmental Monitoring and Characterization. Elsevier Academic Press.
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 2000-level units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. This unit provides an introduction to environmental regulation. We investigate key environmental issues through an examination of environmental policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics. The aim of this Unit is to enable students to understand the broad principles of environmental law and ethics and to apply this understanding to contemporary environmental problems.
ENVI3114 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of 2000-level units Prohibitions: ENVI3001 or PHYS3600 Assumed knowledge: Junior Physics units or Intermediate Environmental Science units Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers many aspects of energy and the environment: energy resources and use; electrical power generation including fossil fuelled and alternate methods; environmental impacts of energy use and power generation including greenhouse gas emissions; transportation and pollution; energy management in buildings; solar thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind power and nuclear energy; embodied energy and net emissions analysis and, importantly, socio-economic and political issues related to energy provision.
GEGE2001 Genetics and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GENE2002 or MBLG2972 or GEGE2901 or MBLG2072 Assumed knowledge: Mendelian genetics; mechanisms of evolution; molecular and chromosomal bases of inheritance; and gene regulation and expression. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The era of genomics has revolutionised our approach to biology. Recent breakthroughs in genetics and genomic technologies have led to improvements in human and animal health, in breeding and selection of economically important organisms and in the curation and care of wild species and complex ecosystems. In this unit, students will investigate/describe ways in which modern biology uses genetics and genomics to study life, from the unicellular through to complex multicellular organisms and their interactions in communities and ecosystems. This unit includes a solid foundation in classical Mendelian genetics and its extensions into quantitative and population genetics. It also examines how our ability to sequence whole genomes has changed our capacities and our understanding of biology. Links between DNA, phenotype and the performance of organisms and ecosystems will be highlighted. The unit will examine the profound insights that modern molecular techniques have enabled in the fields of developmental biology, gene regulation, population genetics and molecular evolution.
GEOS2111 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 6 credit points of 1000-level units from (GEOS1XXX or GEOL1XXX) Prohibitions: GEOS2911 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Staff will organize a non-compulsory half-day weekend field excursion to explore local Sydney hazards for interested students.
The unit provides an essential framework for understanding the environmental response to short- and long-term geologic, oceanic and atmospheric processes. This Unit of Study introduces students to a variety of natural phenomena that affect society with impact levels ranging from nuisance to disastrous. The discussion of each hazard focuses on: (1) the process mechanics, (2) hazards and risk, and (3) methods for mitigation. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used by scientists, planners, policy-makers and the insurance industry alike to address many issues relating to natural hazards. This Unit of Study will introduce students to the major concepts relating to GIS and provide practical experience in the application of GIS techniques to hazard mapping, risk assessment and mitigation.
GEOS2115 Oceans, Coasts and Climate Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOL1501 or GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X02 or GEOS1X03 or BIOL1XXX or ENVI1003 Prohibitions: GEOS2915 Assumed knowledge: GEOG1001 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 or ENVI1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOL1501 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces core concepts about how the formation of ocean basins and their influence on climate govern the development of coasts and continental margins. These concepts provide a framework for understanding the geographic variation of coasts, continental shelves and sediment accumulations in the deep ocean. Ocean-basin evolution is explained in terms of movements within the Earth's interior and how these movements determine the geometry of ocean basins, and their alpine counterparts, which interact with the global circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. This interaction plays a key role in marine sedimentation and controls the environmental conditions responsible for the development of coral reefs and other ecosystems. The Unit of Study systematically outlines how these factors have played out to produce, by gradual change, the coasts we see today, as well as the less familiar deposits hidden beneath the sea and coastal lands. The Unit thereby outlines how knowledge of responses to climate change in the past allow us to predict environmental responses to accelerated climate change occurring now and in the future due to the industrial greenhouse effect, but places these responses into perspective against the geological record. Overall therefore, the Unit aims to provide familiarity with fundamental phenomena central to the study of marine geoscience and environmental impacts, introduced through process-oriented explanations. The Unit of Study is structured around GIS-based practical sessions and problem-based project work, for which lectures provide the theoretical background.
Textbooks
On line reading material provided via Fisher Library
GEOS2116 Earth Surface Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: GEOS2916 or GEOG2321 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: 3-5 day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The surface of the planet on which you live is the product of a balance between tectonic forces and numerous agents of erosion. The landscapes in which you live and work, and from which you draw resources, are therefore the legacy of many processes operating synchronously over long time periods. It is also true that Earth's landscapes are dynamic, and constantly changing around you in response to climate, tectonics and patterns of life. The sustainable management of landscapes is strongly dependent upon an awareness of those processes and the ways that they constrain human-environment interactions. In Earth Surface Processes, you will learn how landscapes are produced, and what this means for contemporary land use. Lectures by experts in physical geography, geology, soil science and environmental science will introduce you to the planetary and regional-scale controls on landforms and landscape dynamics, and the nature and distribution of major Australian landscape types. Focussed around 'hands on' field and laboratory-based tasks, students will gain essential practical, analytical and interpretive skills in the analysis of landscapes and earth surface processes that shape them. This is a unit for anyone wanting to better understand the planet on which they live.
Textbooks
Allen, P.A., 2009. Earth surface processes. John Wiley and Sons. Scitech, 551.3 72 Sharma, V.K., 2010. Introduction to process geomorphology. CRC Press. Scitech, 551.41 113
GEOS2121 Environmental and Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOS1X01 or GEOS1X02 or ECOP1X01 Prohibitions: GEOS2921 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are in the midst of an unprecedented global ecological and climatological crisis, and consequently need to transform our social, political and economic systems. This crisis - its causes, its effects, and its solutions - are geographically unevenly distributed and situated. Therefore, this unit of study uses geographical concepts to consider what has caused this global crisis, how we should think about the relations and interactions between humans and their environments, and what some strategies are for managing our environment and resources to negotiate this predicament. Using examples focused in Australia, Asia, and the Pacific region, students will learn how to integrate environmental, economic, political, social and cultural considerations and perspectives, and how to evaluate environmental and resource management policies and ideas.
GEOS3009 Coastal Environments and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 cp from (GEOS2X11 or GEOS2X15 or GEOS2X16 or GEOS2X21 or BIOL2022) Prohibitions: GEOS3909 or MARS3003 or MARS3105 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this course is to introduce students to a variety of Coastal Environments and the major processes which control the morphodynamic evolution of these systems. The course offers a unique opportunity of learning the full spectrum of marine sedimentary environments from siliciclastic, temperate, highly urbanised and impacted estuarine ecosystems to carbonate, tropical, pristine and undeveloped/protected coastal and continental margin environments. The course is divided in three sections: Section A covers the basic morphodynamics and processes impacting carbonate-dominated coastal and continental margin environments. The focus is on carbonate reefal and margin systems and their geologic and biologic responses to past, present and future environmental changes; Section B covers the basic morphodynamics of temperate and tropical coasts, including beach morphodynamics and basic knowledge on waves and currents; Section C consolidates all concepts learnt in the previous sections by applying them to numerical modelling.
There is a compulsory weekend fieldtrip to the NSW coast to study beach morphodynamics and fieldwork techniques. Depending on the year, there may be a voluntary fieldtrip to a coral reef environment, for example, The University of Sydney One Tree Island Research Station.
Textbooks
List of selected readings provided online.
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)] Prohibitions: GEOS3914 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3053 Asia-Pacific Field School

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Intensive February Classes: Three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Prohibitions: GEOG3201 or GEOS3953 Assessment: Group participation; one major essay; one seminar report; one blog post. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study uses classroom and field-based learning to introduce students to the application of geographical concepts and methods to environmental and development problems in Asia-Pacific countries. The location and timing of this unit may change from year to year in accordance with the availability of lecturers and climatic considerations. In 2019, it will be run over two to three weeks in February, in India. This unit can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator, and involves mandatory attendance at pre-departure briefings. You will learn skills and knowledge about: (1) India's environmental and development challenges at a national scale (2) processes of rural social, environmental and economic change; (3) the challenges of sustainable urbanisation; (4) social transformations in India, specifically relating to gender, migration and mobility, and class. The unit is conducted in partnership with pre-eminent Indian universities, who provide guest lectures as appropriate in addition to those by the unit of study coordinator. The unit will also expose students to civil society groups working on issues of geo-political, economic and environmental importance. By doing this unit you will develop skills and knowledge that are highly relevant to research and careers in the Asia-Pacific.
GEOS3333 Geographical Concepts, Skills and Methods

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour lecture, 1 hour tutorials per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study, including 6 credit points from following (GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 or GEOS2123 or GEOS2923 or GEOS2115 or GEOS2915 or GEOS2121 or GEOS2921 or SOIL2002 or LWSC2002) Prohibitions: GEOS3933 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of ARC GIS software. Assessment: Two 1 hr in-class exams (50%), active participation in fieldwork and classes (25%), one 2000w fieldwork report (25%) Practical field work: Approximately 13 hours of fieldwork per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS3333 is designed to be the 'capstone' for a Major in Geography. Its aim is to bring together the core concepts within the discipline; connect these to methodological practices, and further develop the field-based skills associated with geographical research. Reflecting the straddle of the discipline across the natural and social sciences, this unit draws on a wide diversity of material to impart key insights about the essential qualities of 'doing Geography'. This includes (i) a weekly lecture program which addresses three thematic concerns of Geography (human-environment interactions; spatial relations; and politics, policy and practice) using examples from the natural and social science perspectives at global, national and local scales; (ii) a two-hour prac class each week which introduces key methods (relevant to both the natural and social science parts of the discipline) and which leads to a major research proposal exercise; and (iii) 24 hours fieldwork through the semester, which can take the form either of a three-day field trip to rural NSW or three separate day-trips within Sydney. GEOS3333 is one of two compulsory units for the Geography Major (the other is GEOS3053) and is highly recommended for students contemplating Honours in Geography.
GEOS3520 Urban Citizenship and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOS2X21 or GEOS2X23 or GOES2X15 or GEOS2X11 or LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3920 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
More than half the world's population now live in cities. The contemporary growth of cities, however, is attached to profound political and environmental questions about what it means to be urban, what 'being urban' means for the planet, and how we might produce more just and sustainable urban spaces and experiences. This Unit provides grounding to these crucial questions by examining urban environments from the dual perspectives of citizenship and sustainability. The Unit has three modules. Module 1 examines the intersection of urban environmental change with questions of citizenship and justice. Module 2 considers key urban environmental issues such as energy, transport and food, and how cities and citizens might address stresses and shocks in these systems. Module 3 studies new models for governing emergent urban environmental challenges. Throughout the semester, a Practical Project will involve a research project with real-world partners to introduce key skills related to working in collaboration with external organisations.
GEOS3524 Global Development and Livelihoods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: GEOX2X21 or AREC2005 or GOVT2228 or GEOS2X11 or GEOS2X23 or GEOS2X16 Prohibitions: GEOS3924 or GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with grounding in core theories and frameworks used in Geography to account for the social, spatial and economic unevenness in global development. During the first half of the semester, we focus on questions relating to who are the winners and losers from contemporary patterns of global economic change. This includes the analysis of relevant conceptual approaches to understand processes of global development and inequality (including comparative advantage, global value chain theory, developmentalism, structuralism, neo-liberalism, and post-development). Then, in the second half of the semester, we adopt a livelihoods approach to better understand these broader processes from the perspective of individuals, households and communities. In general, issues are tailored to themes being played out in Asia-Pacific countries. Students are expected to participate in a variety of practical class exercises throughout the semester. This unit provides a feeder-unit into the Southeast Asia Field School.
HPSC2011 Science, Ethics and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: HPSC3107 Assumed knowledge: Students should be familiar will introductory material in Philosophy of Science, Ethics or Sociology. Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is the role of science in society? What should it be? Scientific knowledge is often difficult to understand without years of training, and yet this knowledge is crucial to social welfare, and to our political and environmental futures. In this Unit of Study, we look at the practical realities of living in a society of which science is an integral part. Our examples come from across the sciences, with an emphasis on the health sciences, and on biodiversity, climate change, and environmental challenges. Major themes are:
1. Science in Society: how can publics relate to scientific knowledge? What is the importance of trust in science? What is the role of experts? What does it mean to say that science and society are co-constructed?
2. The West and the Rest: what are the relations between so-called ¿Western science¿ and other knowledge systems? What role has science played in colonial legacies? Our focus is on relations with Aboriginal Australian knowledges and cultures.
Facts and Norms: how does science relate to social and political values? Can scientific facts be independent of these values? We look at the historical origins of important concepts of science and ethics in response to the Second World War, and at present-day examples e.g. in biomedical research.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
HPSC2901 What Is This Thing Called Science? (Adv)

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Godfrey-Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr online study; and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior study with a Distinction average Prohibitions: HPSC2101 or HPSC1001 or HPSC1901 Assessment: 1000-word essay (20%), 2x 2000-word essays (each worth 30%), 10x online exercises (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The topics covered in 'What is This Thing Called Science?' will be covered in more depth, in a special tutorial set aside for advanced students.
Textbooks
Godfrey-Smith, P (2003). Theory and Reality. The University of Chicago Press. USA/ Curd, Cover and Pincock (2013). Philosophy of Science: The Central Issues (2nd edition). W. W. Norton and Company.
HPSC3002 Hist and Phil of the Biomedical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC2101 or HPSC2901) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study is dedicated to the science of life, and focuses on the history and philosophy of biology and medicine. Theories about the origins of life, evolution, the nature and importance of DNA and various environmental factors have been debated by scientists but also in the public sphere. Medical and biological researchers continuously articulate new and innovative theories on the nature of disease and propose novel intervention strategies to alter those conditions. In this Unit of Study, we will take a closer look at the theories of life, disease, and death. We will focus in particular on the contributions historians and philosophers of science can make to discussions in the life sciences.
Textbooks
Weekly Readings
HPSC3016 The Scientific Revolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (HPSC2100 or HPSC2900) and (HPSC1001 or HPSC1901 or HPSC2101 or HPSC2901) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern Western science has a number of characteristics that distinguish it from other scientific cultures. It ascribes its tremendous success to sophisticated experiments and meticulous observation. It understands the universe in terms of tiny particles in motion and the forces between them. It is characterised by high- powered mathematical theorising and the rejection of any intention, value or purpose in Nature. Many of these characteristics were shaped in the 17th century, during the so-called scientific revolution. We will consider them from an integrated historical- philosophical perspective, paying special attention to the intellectual motivations of the canonical figures of this revolution and the cultural context in which they operated. Topics will include: experimentation and instrumentation, clocks, mechanistic philosophy, and the changing role of mathematics.
Textbooks
Weekly Readings
HPSC3023 Psychology and Psychiatry: History and Phil

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (12 credit points of HPSC2XXX OR 12 credit points of PSYC2XXX) OR (6 credit points of HPSC2XXX AND 6 credit points of PSYC2XXX) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Across the unit we examine one of the most interesting aspects of the history and philosophy of science. viz., the scientific practices and assumptions involved in making human beings an object of study. We will examine the ways in which psychologists and psychiatrists have investigated human nature, the kinds of experimental approaches they have developed to that end, the major controversies in this field, and the basic philosophical assumptions that have been made in the sciences of human nature. We investigate the developments of psychological theories and investigative methods as well as the development of psychiatric theory, treatment methods, and institutions.
HPSC3108 Hist and Phil of the Physical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: HPSC2101 or HPSC2901 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study deals with a selection of contemporary debates in the history and philosophy of natural sciences. It covers four main themes: (1) the question of how evidence is gathered in the natural sciences and how it is (and/or other factors) go into confirming theories-we also consider what confirmation consists in (including an examination of Bayesianism). (2) Issues of modelling, representation, and measurement, including an analysis of the ways idealisation, approximation, and simulation are to be understood. (3) Models of scientific explanation, including recent work on laws, prediction, and causality. (4) issues of emergence and reduction, including the problems associated with defining such concepts - we also consider notions of simplicity and the impact of the sciences of complexity. The unit of study involves case studies from the natural sciences that allow students to apply their knowledge and test their understanding. Upon completion of the unit, students will have developed a range of skills that will allow them to explore the physical sciences with more critical attitude.
Textbooks
Weekly readings
MATH2969 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour practice class per week. Prerequisites: 9 credit points of Junior Mathematics (advanced level or Credit at the normal level) Prohibitions: MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2069 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover the same material as MATH2069 with some extensions and additional topics.
MATH2988 Number Theory and Cryptography Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MATH1902 or MATH1904 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002 or MATH1004 or MATH1064) Prohibitions: MATH2068 or MATH2088 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is an advanced version of MATH2068, sharing the same lectures but with more advanced topics introduced in the tutorials and computer laboratory sessions.
Textbooks
Number Theory and Cryptography, R. Howlett, School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney, 2018.
MATH3061 Geometry and Topology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12 credit points of MATH2XXX Prohibitions: MATH3001 or MATH3006 Assumed knowledge: Theory and methods of linear transformations and vector spaces, for example MATH2061, MATH2961 or MATH2022 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of the unit is to expand visual/geometric ways of thinking. The Geometry section is concerned mainly with transformations of the Euclidean plane (that is, bijections from the plane to itself), with a focus on the study of isometries (proving the classification theorem for transformations which preserve distances between points), symmetries (including the classification of frieze groups) and affine transformations (transformations which map lines to lines). The basic approach is via vectors and matrices, emphasising the interplay between geometry and linear algebra. The study of affine transformations is then extended to the study of collineations in the real projective plane, including collineations which map conics to conics. The Topology section considers graphs, surfaces and knots from a combinatorial point of view. Key ideas such as homeomorphism, subdivision, cutting and pasting and the Euler invariant are introduced first for graphs (1-dimensional objects) and then for triangulated surfaces (2-dimensional objects). Topics include the classification of surfaces, map colouring, decomposition of knots and knot invariants.
MICR2031 Microbiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2024 or MICR2931 Assumed knowledge: Fundamental concepts of microorganisms, biomolecules and ecosystems; CHEM1XX1 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microbes are essential for every aspect of life on the planet. Microbes in the human gut control our digestion and our immune system, microbes in the soil are required for plant growth, microbes in the ocean fix more carbon dioxide than all the earth's trees. This unit of study will investigate the diversity and activity of microorganisms - viruses, bacteria, fungi, algae and protozoa - and look at how they interact with us, each other, plants and animals. You will examine how microbes underpin healthy ecosystems through nutrient cycling and biodegradation, their use industrially in biotechnology and food production, and their ability to cause harm, producing disease, poisoning, pollution and spoilage. Aspects of microbial ecology, nutrition, physiology and genetics will also be introduced. This unit of study will provide you with the breadth of knowledge and skills needed for further studies of microbiology, and will provide the fundamental understanding of microbes that you will require if you specialise in related fields such as biochemistry, molecular biology, immunology, agriculture, nutrition and food sciences, bioengineering and biotechnology, ecology or science education.
Textbooks
Willey et al, Prescott's Microbiology, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2017
QBIO2001 Molecular Systems Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic concepts in metabolism; protein synthesis; gene regulation; quantitative and statistical skills Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Experimental approaches to the study of biological systems are shifting from hypothesis driven to hypothesis generating research. Large scale experiments at the molecular scale are producing enormous quantities of data ("Big Data") that need to be analysed to derive significant biological meaning. For example, monitoring the abundance of tens of thousands of proteins simultaneously promises ground-breaking discoveries. In this unit, you will develop specific analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the biological and medical sciences. The unit covers quantitative analysis of biological systems at the molecular scale including modelling and visualizing patterns using differential equations, experimental design and data types to understand disease aetiology. You will also use methods to model cellular systems including metabolism, gene regulation and signalling. The practical program will enable you to generate data analysis workflows, and gain a deep understanding of the statistical, informatics and modelling tools currently being used in the field. To leverage multiple types of expertise, the computer lab-based practical component of this unit will be predominantly a team-based collaborative learning environment. Upon completion of this unit, you will have gained skills to find meaningful solutions to difficult biological and disease-related problems with the potential to change our lives.
Textbooks
An Introduction to Systems Biology: Design Principles of Biological Circuits, Uri Alon, (Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2007). Systems Biology, Edda Klipp, Wolfram Liebermeister, Christoph Wierling, Axel Kowald, Hans Lehrach, and Ralf Herwig, (Wiley-Blackhall, 2009). Molecular biology of the cell, Alberts B et al (6th edition, Garland Science, 2015) Discovering Statistics Using R, Andy Field (2012, SAGE Publications Ltd). Computational and Statistical Methods for Protein Quantitation by Mass Spectrometry, Martens L et al (Wiley, 2013)
SOIL2005 Soil and Water: Earth's Life Support Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: SOIL2003 or LWSC2002 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Practical field work: Approximately eight hours working field at Cobbitty Farm Wk 0 (Friday, 22 Feb 2019) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Soil and water are the two most essential natural resources on the Earth's surface which influence all forms of terrestrial life. This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental properties and processes of soil and water that affect food security and sustain ecosystems. These properties and processes are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability. You will participate in a field excursion to examine soils in a landscape to develop knowledge and understanding of soil properties, water storage, water movement and cycling of organic carbon and nutrients in relation to food production and ecosystem functioning. At the end of this unit you will be able to articulate and quantify the factors and processes that determine the composition and behaviour of soil, composition of water, soil water storage and the movement of water on the land surface. You will also be able to describe the most important properties of soil and water for food production and sustaining ecosystem functions and link this to human and climatic factors. The field excursion, report and laboratory/computer exercises have been designed to develop communication, team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Brady, N.C. and Ray R. Weil. (2007). The Nature and Properties of Soils. 14th Edition, Prentice Hall, New Jersey. White, R.E. (2006) Principles and Practice of Soil Science: the Soil as a Natural Resource. 4th ed., Blackwell Science, Oxford. Diana H. Wall, Richard D. Bardgett, Valerie Behan-Pelletier, Jeffrey E. Herrick, T. Hefin Jones, Karl Ritz, Johan Six, Donald R. Strong, and Wim H. van der Putten (Eds.) (2012). Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services. Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780199575923. Kutllek, M and Nielsen, D.R. (2015). Soil: The Skin of the Planet Earth, Springer, ISBN: 978-94-017-9788-7 (Print) 978-94-017-9789-4 (Online). Gordon, N. D., McMahon, T. A., Finlayson, B. L., Gippel, C. J., and Nathan, R. J. (2004) Stream Hydrology: an Introduction for Ecologists, John Wiley and Sons Inc.
SRSU3601 Data Driven Discovery

This unit of study is not available in 2021

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Sally Cripps Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hrs seminar and 1 hr workshop/group work per week Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge Assessment: Identifying and carrying out relevant independent Research and Reading 10% Seminar interaction 20% Final presentation 20% Final paper 50% Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed for honours and 3rd year students to explore the use of data and data science techniques, in developing and structuring a complex research problem. Students will be part of a multi-disciplinary team that is a partnership between students who are domain specialists and those who are data scientists. Research problems will be chosen to span the space of data-driven discovery. These problems will have the following features (1) The complexity of the problem is always greater than the amount of available data (2) Data is varied in type and comes from heterogeneous sources (3) The problem has the potential for impact. Examples could include what factors predict youth disengagement, How effective was a policy in bringing about change, What lies underneath Australia and what implication does this have for resource discovery?, The obesity epidemic, Are humans more ethical than algorithms. The Centre of Translational Data Science has many such projects, students will be able to choose one of these problem, or to propose a problem of relevance and interest to them. Within these broad areas students will learn to develop a specific research problem, by building data-centric, predictive and testable models of the phenomenon. They will learn how to discover by being specific. Students will be required to outline how they might generalize the ideas in their specific problem to a larger class of problem, and so recognise that research problems in diverse domains, which differ widely in surface characteristics, can have similar structure. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application. Where appropriate, and with the approval of the relevant faculty, this unit may be counted as a selective for a major.
STAT2011 Probability and Estimation Theory

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (DATA1X01 or MATH10X5 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020) Prohibitions: STAT2911 Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to probability, the concept of random variables, special distributions including the Binomial, Hypergeometric, Poisson, Normal, Geometric and Gamma and to statistical estimation. This unit will investigate univariate techniques in data analysis and for the most common statistical distributions that are used to model patterns of variability. You will learn the method of moments and maximum likelihood techniques for fitting statistical distributions to data. The unit will have weekly computer classes where you will learn to use a statistical computing package to perform simulations and carry out computer intensive estimation techniques like the bootstrap method. By doing this unit you will develop your statistical modeling skills and it will prepare you to learn more complicated statistical models.
Textbooks
An Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Its Applications (5th edition), Chapters 1-5, Larsen and Marx (2012)