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A biographical register of Australian colonial musical personnel–O

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS ALWAYS UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "A biographical register of Australian colonial musical personnel–O", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php; accessed 7 June 2020






- O -



Introductory note:

The primary focus of the biographical register is musical personnel first active before the end of 1860, with a secondary focus on members of their circles - families, pupils, colleagues, and other important contacts - first active after 1860.

Beyond that, there has been no systematic attempt as yet to deal with musical personnel first active after 1860, and so far the coverage is selective.

A major upgrade of the contents of this page was completed in December 2019, and newly added documentation (including genealogical data) and Trove tagging now brings the page content up to 1860 close to completion.




OAKEY, Alfred (Alfred OAKEY; Mr. A. OAKEY)

Pianist, composer, cornet-a-piston player, professor of music, concertina player, bandmaster, actor, theatrical manager, photographic artist

Born Shoreditch, London, England, 9 October 1819; baptised St. Leonard's, Shoreditch, 5 March 1820; son of John OAKEY (1783-1854) and Maria MIDDLETON (d. 1865)
Married [1] Hepzibah Emily NORMAN (? d. by 1851), St. Dunstan's and All Saints, Stepney, 28 April 1839
Arrived Melbourne, VIC, 26 November 1852 (per Arundel, from London, via Plymouth, 26 July, aged "31", "musician")
Married [2] Eliza MILES, VIC, 1855
Departed Australia finally, by late 1863
Married [3] Emma DARBY (c. 1846-1918), Nelson, NZ, after 1864
Died Wellington, NZ, 7 December 1896

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Alfred+Oakey+1819-1896 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OAKEY-Alfred (shareable link to this entry)

OAKEY, Eliza (Eliza MILES; ? "Miss HARTLAND"; Mrs. Alfred OAKEY [2] )

Soprano vocalist, actor

? Born UK, c. 1839
? Arrived Melbourne, VIC, August 1851 (assisted immigrant per Sea, age "22")
Active Melbourne, VIC, by 1853 (as "Miss HARTLAND")
Married Alfred OAKEY, VIC, 1855 (reg. no. 1325)
Active VIC, until August 1863

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Eliza+Oakey+actor+vocalist (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OAKEY-Eliza (shareable link to this entry)

? See also https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Miss+Hartland+vocalist+c1853-55 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


OAKEY, Emma (Emma DARBY; Mrs. Alfred OAKEY [3])

Born London, England, c. 1845; daughter of William and Emma DARBY
Married Alfred OAKEY, NZ, by 1869
Died Nelson, NZ, 7 February 1918


Summary:

Alfred Oakey was born at Shoreditch in 1819, a son of John Oakey, professor of music, and his wife Maria Collins.

Family background (after Chris Haines, 2010):

John Oakey was born on 29 November 1783, and baptised at St. Antholin's, Budge Row, Watling Street, in the City of London, on 28 December 1783, a son of John Oakey and his wife Mary. He married Maria Collins, daughter of Edward Collins and Catharine Snowdon, on 12 June 1809 at St. John the Baptist, Clerkenwell. They had at least four children, Maria (b. 1809), Henry (1812), Alfred (1819), and Benjamin Francis (1821). The 1841 census lists John was "music master", of Manor Place, Newington. In 1851, John was a "teacher of music and dealer in pianofortes", of 1 Octavius Terrace, St. Mary, Newington. He died in Camberwell, in 1854. His widow Maria died in 1865.

Alfred's elder brother, Henry Oakey (1812-1893) was also a professional musician, well-known in central London in the 1840s and 1850s as a quadrille pianist, composer, and conductor of dance music bands. Among his published works are The Ethiopian quadrilles ("Oakey's 50th Set") and Her Majesty's Theatre quadrilles.

England (to 1852):

In 1839, Alfred married Hepzibah Norman, who, from later evidence, appears to have been a singer. A daughter, Maria Victoria Hepzibah, was born and died in 1840. In the 1851 census, Alfred was listed as a widower and professor of music, living in Lambeth with his son Alfred, born 1846, and daughter Hepzibah (or Henrietta), born in 1848.

Alfred claimed in advertisements both in England in 1851, and in Australia in 1854, to have been pianist to the duchess of Inverness (Cecilia Underwood, widow of prince Augustus, duke of Sussex, created duchess of Inverness by queen Victoria in 1840).

Two published works almost certainly date from his English years. A ballad, Annie of the vale, to words by W. Fenoulhet, as "sung by Mrs. Fitzwilliam, at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden", was published in London by John Turner. And, probably in 1851 or shortly afterwards, Alfred's father John published his The Crystal Palace waltzes.

Victoria, Australia (1852-63):

Oakey sailed from London for Australia in July 1852, on the Arundel, and arrived alone in Melbourne on 26 November, having evidently left his children in England. Alfred junior (1846-1911) later joined his father in New Zealand.

Alfred's Crystal Palace valse was played by John Winterbottom's band at Rowe's Circus in Melbourne in July 1853, while Oakey himself was appearing with a Miss Hartland (probably the stage name of his future wife, Eliza Miles) and George Peck in the New Music Room at the Dixon Hotel.

From November 1853 to January 1854, Oakey directed a series of twelve Saturday night promenade concerts for J. A. Rowe, at Rowe's Circus. The programmes by his monster orchestra (assisted by members of the bands of the 99th regiment, and 40th regiment) included, as well as dance music by Jullien and d'Albert, many of his own compositions. In January 1854, for instance, he introduced two descriptive dance sets of his own, The Melbourne and Brighton Railway galop (an entirely new galop) [with list of numbers] and The Highland polka (introducing favourite Scottish Airs) [airs listed]. The featured vocalists for the series was Sara Flower, regularly supported by Miss Hartland, and later by Rachael Lazar Moore.

In December 1854 he was advertising:

VICTORIA THEATRE, late Rowe's Circus. The most efficient Melo-dramatic Company in the Colony. Proprietor, Alfred Oakey.

Oakey married Eliza Miles in 1855, and the couple were in Ballarat appearing at the Star Concert Hall in September that year.

At James Mulholland's benefit there in September 1856, three songs with words by Mulholland and "music composed by Mr. Oakey" were sung: Song for the bush (sung by Mrs. Oakey), Ballarat proper (Mr. D. Golding), and The forthcoming election (Mulholland).

The Oakeys were back in Melbourne in June 1857 at Dilke's Concert Hall, where "Composer and Musical Director", Oakey introduced his The colonies: the new local chorus ("composed and arranged by Alfred Oakey, esq.").

Back again in Ballarat in April 1859, Eliza Oakey, billed as "the Ballarat favourite", made her "first appearance these three years".

Alfred was declared insolvent in March 1863, and the couple last appeared together in Geelong in August 1863. Thereafter, as "Mrs. Oakey", Eliza disappears from record.

New Zealand (from 1863):

Alfred evidently left Australia alone, late in 1863, to join Charles Thatcher and Annie Vitelli again in New Zealand. They first appeared together there at the Otago theatre in December 1863. In January 1864, Alfred was briefly committed for a "mental affliction".

Nevertheless, he married again in New Zealand. His wife, Emma Darby, had arrived in New Zealand with her parents in 1859. Her father, William Darby (c. 1819-1891), was a carpenter and pianoforte maker, for 24 years with John Broadwood & Sons in London. Darby opened a music warehouse in Nelson, and Oakey, some time before 1869, married his daughter.

Alfred and Emma's four surviving children were musical. When young, Ernest (1869-1942) and Frank (1874-1958) worked as piano tuners, while Cyril (1878-1945) trained as a pianoforte maker with John Brinsmead & Sons in England, and Lillian (1881-1961, Mrs. Sharland) was a pianist and piano teacher.

With thanks, 2020, to Lillian Oakey's grand-daughter, Pamela Frost (Sharland), for sharing her family history.


Documentation:

England (to 1852):

Baptisms solemnized in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . . . in the year 1820; London Metropolitan Archives

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/1558/31281_a101310-00018 (PAYWALL)

No. 174 [March] 5 / Alfred / [son of] John & Maria / Oakey / Brunswick Terrace / Professor of Music / [born] 9 Oct. 1819

Register of banns of marriages, St. Dunstan and All Saints, Stepney; London Metropolitan Archives 

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/1623/31280_194784-00538 (PAYWALL)

[1839 April] 14, 21, 28, Alfred Oakey bach. . . . Hepzibah Emily Norman Spin. both of this parish

[Advertisement], Morning Advertiser [London] (9 December 1846), 1

CAUTION. My Wife, HEPZIBAH OAKEY, having left her home without my sanction, I hereby declare that I will not be answerable for any debt or debts that she may contract after this date. - Dec. 7. ALFRED OAKEY, 83. Fenchurch street.

Trial of Robert Gregory, for theft, burglary, 15 May 1848; Old Bailey online

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18480515-1337 

. . . HEPZIBAH OAKEY [witness]. The prisoner have me this parrot on the Tuesday morning of the week it was taken - he came to the institution where I was singing, and said he had a parrot he was taking care of, and asked if I would accept of it - I asked if it was his own, he said yes, that his aunt was gone into the country for a week to fortnight - I kept it for two days, and then reading an account in the paper that a sailor was taken up for stealing a parrot, I took it to Mrs. Gregory's, and found it was hers . . .

England census, 30 March 1851, Surrey, Lambeth, St. Mary Newington, St. Peter Walworth; UK National Archives, HO 107/1567

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/8860/SRYHO107_1567_1567-0670 (PAYWALL)

Alfred Oakey / Head / Wid[owe]r / 30 / professor of Music / [Where born] Shoreditch
Alfred [Oakey] / Son / 5 / Whitechapel
Henrietta [Oakey, recte Hepzibah ?] / Dau. / Inf. / London . . .

[Advertisement], Morning Advertiser [London] (23 September 1851), 1

VOCALISTS. - Parties desirous of ENGAGING in the COUNTRY, are requested to apply immediately, to Alfred Oakey, at Mr. W. T. Purkiss's, Oriental Assembly-rooms, East-street, Southampton, stating the lowest terms. Sentimental, Comic, and Character Singers are required.

[Advertisement], Hampshire Advertiser (27 December 1851), 4

SOUTHAMPTON TUESDAY CONCERTS. - ROYAL VICTORIA ROOMS. The Directors beg most respectfully to inform the Nobility and Gentry that a Series of TWELVE CONCERTS Will take place at the above Rooms on twelve successive Tuesdays, commencing on Tuesday, December 30th, 1851, when the following talented Artistes will have the honour of appearing: - MISS FANNY COSTA, from Exeter Hall. MISS BASQUINE ROOKE, Daughter of the Great Composer. MR. LOUIS BLAND, the Celebrated Tenor. MR. SEYMOUR, and MR. DUNCAN DOUGLAS, Basso. Conductor - MR. ALFRED OAKEY, Pianist to the Duchess of Inverness. Violinist - MR. BRAY . . .

"SOUTHAMPTON TUESDAY CONCERTS", Hampshire Advertiser (3 January 1852), 4

A series of weekly concerts was commenced at the Victoria Rooms on Tuesday evening last, under the direction of Mr. Alfred Oakey . . . The pieces were well selected, and without any unnecessary or false pretension being made, admirably executed. The programme embraced songs, duets, ballads, &c. from Italian and English composers. We refer to an advertisement in another column for the announcement of the concert for next Tuesday.

Victoria, Australia (1852-63):

Arrivals, unassisted passengers, per ship Arundel, from London, Port Phillip Bay, 26 November 1852

NAMES AND DESCRIPTIONS OF PASSENGERS . . . Oakey, Alfred / 31 / Musician / English / . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (30 July 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4795134

ROWES CIRCUS. To-night. Grand Scottish Festival. Winterbottom's Grand Promenade Concert . . .
PROGRAMME . . . PART II . . . Valse - Crystal Palace - Alfred Oakey . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (10 September 1853), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article255612057 

ROWE'S CIRCUS. - Winterbottom's Benefit Saturday next, September 10th . . . Solo Instrumentalists: M. Tucker, M. Edwards, Radford, Louthusl, Webb, Burgess, Chate, Boullemer, Tranter, S. Chapman, Wigney, Holt, Hore, Simpson, Wheeler, Oakey, Marks, Thatcher, &c. . . . PROGRAMME . . . PART II . . . Valse - The Prize - Oakey . . .

"THE QUEEN'S THEATRE", The Argus (15 October 1853), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4798157

We perceive that the popular, amusing, and really clever Barlow [gives a] vocal and instrumental concert at the Queen's Theatre this evening . . . Miss Louisa Urie, Mons. Paltzer Sivorini, Mr. Oakey, and other talented persons have been engaged . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (15 October 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4798149 

QUEEN'S THEATRE - Barlow's Farewell Concert To-night . . .
The following Talented Performers will appear: -
Mons. Paltzer Sivorini, late premier violinist in the orchestra of the King of the Belgians, and pupil of De Beriot.
Mis Louisa Urie.
Mr. Thomas Dixon, Tenor.
Mr. George Stanley, who will sing Russell's celebrated scena, The Ship of Fire.
Mr. J. Fairchild, Basso.
Mr. A. Oakey, late pianist to the Duchess of Kent, will preside at the Grand Pianoforte, and also play a Duet on the cornopean and pianoforte . . .
PROGRAMME - PART FIRST.
Overture - Violin and Pianoforte - Messrs. Paltzer and Oakey.
New Song - Opportunity - Mr. Barlow.
The Beauties of Ireland.
Irish Ballad - Katty Darling - Mr. Barlow.
The Rival Pipers; or, a Tear for Old Ireland.
Comic Song - The Lasses of Derry - Mr. Barlow.
Song - I'm Afloat - Mr. Geo. Stanley.
Ballad - Jessie, the Flower of Dumblane - Miss Urie.
Song - When I beheld the Archer - Mr. J. Fairchild.
Ballad - I would I were a Boy again - Mr. Dixon.
Comic Song - Local - Mr. Barlow.
Solo (Violin) - Ma Coline - Mons. Paltzer.
Duetto - Cornet and Pianoforte - Mr. A. Oakey.
End of Part first - An elapse of ten minutes.
PART SECOND.
Waltz - Violin and Pianoforte - Mons. Paltzer and Oakey.
Descriptive Song - The Ship on Fire - Mr. Geo. Stanley.
Ballad -Bonny Betty Lee - Miss Urie.
Negro Entertainment, a la Black Jullien.
Solo - Cornet.
Ballad - Thou art gone from my gaze - Mr. Dixon,
Solo-Violin (Passionato) - Mons. Paltzer.
Duet - Banjo and Violin (with variations) - Messrs. Barlow and Paltzer.
Song - Blue Tailed Fly, Railway Overture, and Plantation Dance - Mr. Barlow . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (9 November 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4799272 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . Mr. Rowe begs to Inform the inhabitants of Melbourne and its vicinity, that being ever anxious to cater for the gratification of his patrons, he has made arrangements for a Series of Vocal and Instrumental Saturday Evening Concerts, the first of which will be given next Saturday evening. Mr. A. Oakey will be the Leader and Conductor of the Entertainments, which will equal if not surpass anything of the kind which has ever been presented in Melbourne. Further particulars will be given hereafter.

[Advertisement], The Argus (12 November 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4799383 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS. Grand Promenade Concert. Saturday Evening, 12th November, 1853.
Under the direction of Mr. Alfred Oakey.
In announcing he the inhabitants of Melbourne the first of a Series of Saturday Evening Promenade Concerts, Mr. Rowe begs to state that he feels great confidence in submitting the Evening's Entertainments to his patrons . . .
The Monster Band
Will embrace all the available talent in Melbourne, assisted by several members of the band of the 99th regiment.
Vocalists,
Miss Hartland, her first appearances.
Mr. Walsh
Mr. Foster, (his first appearance)
Herr Rahm and Herr Gross . . .
INSTRUMENTAL ARTISTS: -
Grand Pianoforte - Mr. Alfed Oakey.
Violin Primo - M. Tucker and Mr. Peck.
Violin Secondo - Mr. Howson and Mr. Mathers.
Viol . . . Mr. Boullimeir.
Violoncello . - Mr J. Chapman.
Contra Bass - Mr Tranter and Mr. Chate.
Flute - Mr. Hill and Mr. Thatcher.
Cornet Primo and Saxe Clavicore - Mr. P. C. Burke.
Saxe Horn - Mr. Hore and Sons.
Clarionet Primo - Mr. R. Martin.
Clarionet Secondo - Mr. J. Bull.
Ophecleide - Mr. Wigney.
Trombone - Mr. Freeman.
Tambour and Triangle - Mr. Sharp.
Gran Cassa Cymbals - Mr. Shottan.
Leader, Mr. Edward Tucker.
Conductor - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
- Madame Sara Flower is hourly expected . . .

[Playbill], Rowe's American Circus, Melbourne, 19 November 1853

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/7919387

First night of Jullien's new Irish quadrille the Hibernians. Madame Sara Flower (the Australian nightingale) will make her appearance this evening. Rowe's American circus: the second grand promenade concert will take place on Saturday evening, Nov. 19, 1853 under the direction of Mr. Alfred Oakey . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (19 November 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4799693 

ROWE'S CIRCUS: - The Second of the Series of Grand Promenade Concerts!!
Will be given at this Establishment on Saturday, the 19th November. In announcing this Entertainment Mr. Rowe begs most gratefully to return his thanks to his patrons and the public for the encouragement he received in the large amount of patronage bestowed on the First of the Series of Concerts which was given last Saturday. As well as seeking to repay himself a very large outlay, Mr. Rowe has been put to in getting up and presenting these Concerts to the public, he has been also induced to give them from a desire to encourage and promote in the mass a love of good and popular music. And another important object has been to offer an evening's rational amusement which should induce many to spend their Saturday Evenings, who would probably otherwise fill up their leisure hour in amusements far less rational and beneficial than a Promenade Concert. Having these objects in view, Mr. Rowe is happy to announce that the Right Worshipful John Hodgson, Esq., known as the poor man's friend,
The Mayor of Melbourne
has been pleased to give these Concerts his patronage, and has kindly announced his intention of attending that which is to be given on the 19th instant.
An evidence of the high order of the kind of artistic and professional talent Mr. Rowe intends to procure for these Concerts, will be found in the fact that he has a very great expense engaged the services of the celebrated Australian Nightingale,
Madame Sara Flower,
who will on this occasion sing a great number of her best and choicest gems of song. Another engagement which Mr. Rowe begs to announce to the visitors to the Circus, is that in future the whole of the vacant space in the Arena which is not used for the new stage and Orchestra, will be thrown open to the public for a Promenade.
The Monster Orchestra
Will embrace all the available talent in Melbourne, assisted by several members of the band of the 99th regiment.
Vocalists,
Madame Sara Flower, the Australian Nightingale
Miss Hartland, Mr. Walsh, and Herr Gross.
Instrumentalists.
Grand Piano Forte .- Mr. Alfred Oakey
Violino Primo - Mr. Tucker and Mr. Peck
Vlolino Secondo - Mr. Howson, Mr. Mather, and Mr. Burgess.
Viola - Mr. Boullimere
Vloloncello - Mr. C. Chapman.
Contra Basso - Mr. Tranter and Mr. Chate.
Flauto - Mr. Hill and Mr. Thatcher.
Cornet Primo - Mr. P. C. Burke
Saxe horns - Mr. Hore and Sons
Clarinetti - Mr. Martin and Mr. Stretton
Tambour et Triangle - Mr. Sharp
Gran Cassa et Cymbal - Mr. Bull.
Leader - Mr. Tucker.
Conductor - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
First Night of Jullien's New Irish Quadrille,
The Hibernians . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (26 November 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4799993 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS. Unprecedented Success. Crowded Houses.
The third Grand Promenade Concert will take place On Saturday evening, Nov. 26th, 1853.
Mr. Alfred Oakey's celebrated Monster Orchestra, embracing all the talent available in Melbourne.
Madame Sara Flower, the Australian Nightingale. First appearance of Mr. J. C. Bland, from Crosby Hall, London.
In consequence of the rapturous applause bestowed upon Jullien's Hibernian Quadrilles on Saturday last, they will be repeated this evening.
First night of Jullien's celebrated Derby Galop, with all the original effects.
Vocalists: Madame Sara Flower, the Australian Nightingale; Miss Hartland, Mr. Walsh, Mr. J. C. Bland. Leader - Mr. Tucker. Conductor- Mr. Alfred Oakey . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (3 December 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4800283 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . The Fourth GRAND PROMENADE CONCERT Will be Given This Evening, Saturday, December 3rd, 1853 . . .
Entire Change of Programme with the exception of Jullien's Derby Galop . . . First Night of D'Albert's New Scotch Quadrilles . . .
In preparation for Saturday, December 10th, A New Grand Medley Overture, from the pen of Mr. Alfred Oakey, in which several new features will be introduced . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (10 December 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4800538 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . The Fifth of a series of GRAND PROMENADE CONCERTS . . . on SATURDAY EVENING, December 10th, 1853 . . .
First Night of a New Comic Medley Overture, composed by Mr. Alfred Oakey . . . the Adonis Galop, by the same, and dedicated to J. A. Rowe, Esq.
Leader, Mr. M. Radford.
Conductor and composer, Mr. Alfred Oakey . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (17 December 1853), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article255612483 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS, Corner of Stephen and Lonsdale streets.
The sixth of a Series of Grand PROMENADE CONCERTS will take place at the above place of amusement on
Saturday Evening, December 7th, 1853.
Mr. Alfred Oakey's Monster Orchestra, aided by several members of the band of the 40th Regiment, including Mr. Hartigan, the celebrated performer on the Ophicleide (by permission of Lieut. Colonel Valiant).
First night of a new descriptive Polka, entitled "The Morris Dancer," by Alfred Oakey.
Dawn of the Morning, The Lark, The Cuckoo Solo, Mr. Murrill; Home sweet home, duet - clarionets, Mr. Murrill and Mr. Colman; the Church Bell, the Ploughboy, the Shepherd's Pipe and Tabor, the Morris Dance, Sticks and Bells, Evening, the Church Bell.
Second performance of Oakey's New Grand Comic Medley Overture, which was honored with the most enthusiastic reception on last Saturday evening.
Second performance of the Adonis Galop with Solos - Flute, Mr. Murrill; Ophicleide, Mr. Hartigan. Dedicated to J. A. Rowe, Esq., by Alfred Oakey.
First night of the Matilda Polka, by J. W. Hartigan. Introduction, Clarionet solo, Mr. F. Colman.
Vocalists: Madame Sara Flower (the Australian Nightingale),
Miss Harland [sic], who will sing a new Irish Ballad entitled The Poor Irish Boy. Music by Alfred Oakey.
Mr. Walsh (the favorite buffo vocalist), and Mr. Riley.
Instrumentalists.
Pianoforte - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Viollno primo - Mr. Bedford and Mr. Peck.
Vlolino Second - Mr. Mather and Mr. Burgess.
Viola - Mr. Telhurst [Tolhurst].
Violincello - Mr. S. Chapman and Mr. Minton.
Contra Basso - Mr. West and Mr. Chate.
Clarionetti - Mr. Colman and Mr. Murrill.
Flauto - Mr. S. Murrill.
Cornetti - Mr. P. C. Burke and Mr. Wood.
Saxe Horns - Mr. Hore and Sons.
Ophlcleide - Mr. T. W. C. Hartigan and Mr. Wigney.
Trombones - Mr. McNamara and Mr. Clansea.
Tambour - Mr. -
Gran Cassa of Cymbals - Mr. Cottiss.
Leader - Mr. M. Radford.
Conductor and Composer - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
For further particulars see the Programmes for the evening.
In Preparation:
Grand Indian Quadrille, by Jullien, the Band arrangement by Alfred Oakey.
In this composition the different styles of Music in India are introduced. The Rokatahs, Teranahs, Tuppahs, and Rasgniss. The Palankin March, the celebrated air Taza bu Tast, the Rohillahs or Warrior's March, and the Brahmin Hymn, as played in the procession which precedes the car of Juggernaut . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (24 December 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4801063 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . Grand Promenade Concert . . . Saturday Evening, December 24th, 1853, (Christmas Eve)
Mr. Alfred Oakey's Celebrated Monster Orchestra, augmented by the addition of several members of the band of the 40th regiment including Mr. Hartigan, the celebrated performer on the Ophicleide . . .
Grand Christmas Festival. Vocalists.
Madame Sara Flower - (The Australian Nightingale) will sing the Scena from Bellini's Opera of Norma . . .
Miss Hartland - "The Irish Boy" and a "Carol for Christmas Eve," written and composed by Alfred Oakey . . .
The First Night of Jullien's Grand Indian Quadrille, The Band arrangement by Alfred Oakey . . .
Second night of the new descriptive polka entitled The Morris Dancers by Alfred Oakey . . .
Last night of Oakey's Comic Medley Overture . . .
Conductor and composer, Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Leader, Mr. M. Radford . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (31 December 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4801313 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . The Eighth of a Series of Grand Promenade Concerts will take place on Saturday, December 31st, 1853.
The Band will be under the direction of Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Vocalists, Madame Sara Flower - Miss Hartland - Mrs. Moore and Mr. Riley.
Conductor - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Leader - Mr. M. Radford.

[Advertisement], The Argus (7 January 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4801619 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS. The Ninth of a Series of GRAND PROMENADE CONCERTS Will take place on Saturday Evening, Jan. 7th, 1854.
The Band will be under the direction of Mr. Alfred Oakey. Solos by Messrs. Moore and P. C. [? Ba ko].
Vocalists: Madame Sara Flower (the Australian Nightingale), Mrs. Moore, Miss Hartland, and Mrs. Riley.
First Night of Auber's overture to the Opera of Masaniello.
Conductor - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Leader - Mr. Tucker . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (14 January 1854), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4801997 

ROWE'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . The tenth of a series of Grand Promenade Concerts . . . January 14th . . .
First night of Jullien's Bloomer Quadrille.
Mr. Rowe has also engaged the eminent violinist, Mr. J. Paltzer, late Violino Primo in the King of Belgium's orchestra . . .
First night of a new Chinese Polka, by Alfred Oakey entitled Tchong-Kous, or the Middle Kingdom, with Descriptive Introduction, and Grand March of the Military Mandarins.
Reappearance of Herr Rahm, the celebrated Tyrolean vocalist and performer on the Zeither.
First night of the Melbourne Polka, by Alfred Oakey.
Conductor - Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Leader - Mr. M. Radford . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (21 January 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4802240 

ROWE'S CIRCUS . . . The Eleventh of a series of Promenade Concerts . . . Saturday evening, Jan. 21, 1854 . . .
First performance of a new Polka, entitled The Highland Girl, Introducing the favorite Scotch Melodies of "Margie Lawder," "My Boy Tammy," and "Auld Lang Syne." Composed by A. Oakey for the Soiree at Kensington Palace given by his Patroness the Duchess of Inverness.
Second night of the Chinese polka Tchong Kous, or the Middle Kingdom.
Full night of Jullien's American Quadrilles.
Solo, Saxe Clavicor, Mr. P. C. Burke . . .
In preparation for Saturday, the 28th inst., a new Descriptive Galop by Alfred Oakey, entitled
The Melbourne and Brighton Railway.
With various novel effects. Also several new compositions . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (28 January 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4802560

ROWES CIRCUS. Enlargement of the Orchestra.
The Twelfth of a series of PROMENADE CONCERTS will take place on Saturday evening, January 28th, 1854.
Mr. Alfred Oakey's celebrated Monster Orchestra.
On this occasion the band will embrace all the available talent of Melbourne, including the services of a considerable number of the band of the 40th Regiment.
Mr. T. Paltzer, the celebrated Solo Performer, late Violino Primo to the King of Belgium.
Mr. Hartigan, the renowned Ophecledie, will perform a new solo.
Solo on the clarionet, Mr. J. Coleman.
First appearance of Mr. Power, the Vocalist.
Madame Sara Flower, the Queen of Song, and Miss Hartland.
First appearance of an entirely new Galop, entitled the Melbourne and Brighton Railway, composed by Alfred Oakey.
Introduction - Solo, ophecleide, The Jolly Waggoner, Mr. Hartigan.
Whip and horse bell - coach horn - telegraph bell - railway bell - starting the train - the steam and whistle - the tunnel alarm whistle - arrival at the first station - the railway bell and re starting the train - arrival at the terminus.
Second night of the Highland Polka, introducing the favorite Scottish Melodies. - Maggie Lauder, My Boy Tammy, and Auld Lang Syne, composed by Alfred Oakey.
First night of an original Quadrille, by T. Paltzer, Seige of Mauritius, Bourbon and Madagascar.
Also by the same composer, The Creole Polka.
Conductor and Composer, Mr. Alfred Oakey.
Leader - Mr. M. Radford . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (29 July 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4795724

MUSICAL EVENING ENTERTAINMENT. This Evening, the New Music Room at the Union Hotel, in Great Bourke-street, will be opened to the public, and the whole establishment will be brilliantly lighted with gas. The following popular and talented artistes are engage: Messrs. Alfred Oakey, Alfred Phillips, George Peck, and Miss Hartland, by whose united talents a first-class Vocal and Musical Entertainment is insured. Entrance, Free. Instrumental Orchestra will commence in the Bar at seven, and the concert at eight o'clock.

[Advertisement], The Argus (2 September 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4797188 

UNION SALOON. Great Bourke street. Open Every Evening. Quartette on the Pianoforte, Sax-clavicor, Harmonium, and Cornopean, by Mr. Alfred Oakey, Late Composer and Conductor to the most successful Monster Concerts at Rowe's Circus. Mr. O., late Pianist to the Duchess of Inverness, and author of upwards of fifty compositions, respectfully solicits pupils for either of the above instruments. The system of tuition on the piano embraces a thorough knowledge of the laws of harmony and composition, which is indispensable to quick reading, and greatly facilitates rapid execution. Pianofortes, &c., tuned on the principle of equal temperament, as practised at Messrs. Broadwood's. Terms moderate. Address Post Office, Melbourne, or the Union, Great Bourke street.

[Advertisement], The Argus (8 December 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4801491

"Miscellaneous Information" Victoria Police Gazette (12 January 1855), 7

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/60885/44406_b220368-00007 (PAYWALL)

Two warrants of commitment for want of distress have been issued by the Melbourne Branch against Alfred Oakey, one for neglecting to pay the sum of £18 and 10s. costs, wages due to THOMAS SAMPSON, of Melbourne. The other for neglecting to pay the sum of £12, wages due to one WILLIAM WHITE, and 10s. costs. Oakey's description is about 5 feet 7 inches high, prominent features, dark eyes, black hair, dark complexion. Is a pianist by profession. Formerly played at the Union Hotel Concert Room, and was recently lessee of the Victoria Theatre (late Rowe's circus). Information to the Detective Office, Melbourne. - 8th January, 1855.

[Advertisement], The Argus (14 February 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4804360 

PROMENADE CONCERTS a la Julien - The first Concert will take place this Evening at the new Music Hall, corner of Napier-street, Collingwood. Principal Performers, Mrs. C. Weston, (pupil of Miss. Louisa Pyne), Mons. Emile de Granville, Mr. George Peck, Solo Violin, Herr Richty, Leader and Violino Primo. A full and complete Orchestra of solo performers.
Pianoforte and Organ Expressive, Mr. A. Oakey.
Commence at eight precisely. Promenade, one shilling; reserved seats, half-a-crown.

[Advertisement], The Star (22 September 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66038937

[Advertisement], The Star (30 August 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66039330

[Advertisement], The Age (28 May 1857), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154821309 

TILKE'S CITY CONCERT HALL . . .
The Colonies.
The new Local Chorus, composed and arranged by Alfred Oakey, Esq.,
every evening at quarter past Nine o'clock.
Composer and Musical Director, Mr Alfred Oakey.

[Advertisement], The Argus (8 June 1857), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7133162 

TILKES CITY CONCERT HALL, licensed pursuant to Act of Council - Unprecedented Success! Crowded Houses Nightly. First night of the serenade entitled "Queen of May," written and composed expressly for this establishment, by Alfred Oakey, Esq. In consequence of the immense success attending the production of Matthew Locke's music introduced in Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth, it will be repeated every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Mr. Alfred Oakey's wonderful performance on two instruments, the Pianoforte and Pan-Harmonium at one time will be repeated every alternate evening. Doors open at Seven. The Overture commencing precisely at half past. Musical Director and Composer, Mr. A. Oakey.

[Advertisement], The Star (19 April 1959), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66335266

Sands's Melbourne directory 1860, 248, 313

Oakey, Alfred, photographic artist, 29 Bourke-street east

Daguerrean and Photographic Artists . . . Oakey, Alfred, 29 Bourke-street east

[Advertisement], The Star (14 April 1863), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72557517

"NEW INSOLVENTS", The Star (27 April 1863), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72556543

(Schedule filed in Ballarat) Alfred Oakey, of the Main Road, Ballarat, professor of Music, debts £372 5s 6d. Assets £78 1s., deficiency £294 4s. 6d. Causes of insolvency, losses in business, pressure of creditors, and verdict obtained against him in the Police Court. Solicitor, Mr. Jeffries, Melbourne.

"DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT", Portland Guardian (29 June 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64629085

"MR. AND MRS. OAKEY AT THE LYCEUM", Portland Guardian (2 July 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article64629105

"CURRENT TOPICS", Geelong Advertiser (18 August 1863), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150410868 

Mrs. Oakey's entertainment at the Mechanics' Institute last night, was spoiled in a very peculiar manner. It seems that Mr. Oakey is an uncertificated insolvent; and the assignee of the estate deeming the occasion a favorable one for obtaining possession of some assets, caused the receipts taken at the door to be seized, as well as all the "properties" employed in the performance. The sensation produced in the audience was of a kind different from that which they looked for, and although the interruption to the performances was not more than was required, great numbers of the audience left, and those who remained lost, of course, much of the zest with which under more favorable circumstances would have been imparted to the entertainment.

New Zealand (from 1863):

"OPENING OF THE NEW THEATRE", Southland Times (28 December 1863), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18631228.2.10 

The new theatre in Conon-street was opened on Saturday night . . . The theatre having been engaged for a time by Mr. C. R. Thatcher, the entertainments given on the opening night were composed of that gentleman's vocalisation, and of singing by Madame Vitelli, the instrumental portion of the concert being furnished by Mr. Alfred Oakey (piano), Mr. Hunter (violin), and by Mr. Thatcher (flute). Small as the company is, it is not scant of talent, the best test of its efficiency being found in the fact that for some three hours a large audience was thoroughly entertained and amused. Dividing the evening's entertainment into two portions, the time was alternately occupied by the performance of a selection of overtures by the orchestra, by the singing of Mr. Thatcher, and by Madame Vitelli . . .

[News], Southland Times (4 January 1864), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18640104.2.10

Holiday times have brought a golden harvest to the Theatre Royal. On New Year's, and the following Saturday night, every seat in the house had its Occupant. Indeed, it is very questionable if the more legitimate theatrical entertainments of the season - the pantomime and the burlesque - would draw larger audiences than Thatcher's local songs, and Madame Vitelli's vocal performances. A judicious addition to the entertainment has been made by the engagement of Mr. Leeman, whose fine bass voice is of great service in the glees and madrigals which are now introduced. Recent events, such as the Caledonian Games, the trip to Stewart's Island by one steamer on Christmas Day, the postponed trip to the same place on New Year's Day by another steamer, and other local incidents, have been humorously versified by Thatcher, and each happy hit at some celebrity or other is received with roars of laughter. Madame Vitelli also improved the occasion by an introduction of some of the best of the Scottish ballads, and by a very pretty song on the Old and New Year. A well-conducted orchestra, under the leadership of Mr. Alfred Oakey, for accompanying the singers, and for the performance of overtures, is not the least of the attractions of the theatre.

"RESIDENT MAGISTRATE'S COURT. RECOVERED", Southland Times (18 January 1864), 3

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ST18640118.2.16

Alfred Oakey, who had been remanded for medical advice, while suffering from a mental affliction, was brought up, and the evidence of Drs. McClure and Murray being fully satisfactory that he was perfectly recovered, the Bench discharged him.

[Advertisement], Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle (14 December 1865), 4

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18651214.2.16.1 

MR. ALFRED OAKEY, Teacher of the PIANOFORTE, HARMONIUM, and CORNOPEAN. Terms, &c., at Mr. Darby's Music Repository. PIANOS TUNED, REPAIRED, and EEGULATED. QUADRILLE PARTIES, CONCERTS, &c., ATTENDED.

"CRITICISM ON THE LATE HARMONIC CONCERT. TO THE EDITOR . . .", Nelson Examiner and New Zealand Chronicle (1 February 1866), 3

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18660201.2.12 

"PRESENTATION", Colonist (17 March 1886), 3

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TC18860317.2.6 

At the conclusion of the Volunteer Inspection parade last evening, the Garrison Band were ordered to the front of the battalion, and Colonel Pitt stated that he had been asked on behalf of the Band to present their Bandmaster, Mr. Alfred Oakey, with an expression of their feelings towards him during the many years they had been connected. In presenting the address, he said he was sure that he was not only expressing the confidence of the members of the Band, but also every member of the Garrison, and he also referred in very high terms to the efficiency of Mr. Oakey as a bandmaster. In conclusion he called upon those present to give three cheers for Mr. Oakey, which were heartily given. Mr. Oakey, who was evidently surprised, replied in suitable terms. The address, which had been neatly illuminated and engrossed by Mr. Topliss, was as follows:-

"To Mr. Alfred Oakey, Bandmaster of Nelson Garrison Band. -
Dear Sir, - The members of the Nelson Garrison Band wish to take this opportunity of expressing their confidence towards you as their conductor. Most of them have been connected with you as members for nearly thirteen years, and all are unanimous in the feeling of admiration and respect at your conductorship, and for the thorough knowledge, untiring patience, zeal, and courtesy invariably extended to them. We therefore ask your acceptance of the accompanying baton as a slight mark of our esteem, and trust that you will have good health and bug life to wield it. -
We beg to subscribe ourselves Henry Bashford, G. Vause, A. H. Leaper, Committee."

The baton was a handsome silver mounted one, and with it was a beautiful case.

"MEMORANDA", Nelson Evening Mail (20 April 1886), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18860420.2.8 

Mr. Alfred Oakey, agent for Brinsmead and other pianos.

"DEATH", Nelson Evening Mail (7 December 1896), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18961207.2.7 

OAKEY. - On December 6th, at Wellington, Alfred Oakey, of this city.

"DEATH OF MR. ALFRED OAKEY", Nelson Evening Mail (7 December 1896), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM18961207.2.10

Many old citizens of Nelson will learn with deep regret of the somewhat sudden death in Wellington to-day of Mr. Alfred Oakey, of Bridge-street. Mr. Oakey had been ailing for a couple of years, and had been accompanied by Mrs. Oakey to Wellington for his health a few weeks ago, but no one thought that the end would be so sudden. Mr. Oakey when in good health was closely associated with musical movements in Nelson. He came here from Melbourne with the late Richmond Tatcher [? Charles Thatcher] in the year of the Nelson Exhibition, and he joined the local volunteers at that date. He was thereafter bandmaster of the Garrison Band for 15 years. Mr. Oakey was in Victoria in the early mining days and he was present in the stirring scenes of the Ballarat riots, being at that time a close companion of the late Sir Peter Lalor. In Nelson Mr. Oakey was greatly liked and much respected for his quiet unassuming geniality and for his fortitude under great suffering. He has left a widow and a family of five with whom the deepest sympathy is felt in their bereavement. There are four sons and a daughter. Two of the sons, Messrs. Ernest and Frank Oakey are in Nelson, and Mr. C. T. Oakey is with the famous firm of Brinsmead and Sons in England. The remains of the late Mr. Oakey will be brought to Nelson by the Wainui and the funeral is announced for tomorrow afternoon.

"DEATH", Nelson Evening Mail (7 February 1918), 4

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NEM19180207.2.24 

OAKEY. - On February 7th, at Nelson, Emma Oakey, aged 73 years. Private interment.

"PERSONAL", The Colonist (8 February 1918), 4

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TC19180208.2.22 

The death occurred yesterday of Mrs. E. Oakey, of Trafalgar-street, a highly, respected resident, after a long illness, at the age of 73. The late Mrs. Oakey had been a resident of Nelson for many years, having arrived with her parents in 1859. She married the late Mr. Alfred Oakey, who had the well-known business in Bridge street. Mr Oakey died in 1890, and after that Mrs. Oakey carried on the business. Three sons and a daughter are left to mourn their loss.


Extant musical works:

Annie of the vale, ballad, sung by Mrs. Fitzwilliam, at the Theatre Royal Covent Garden, the words by W. Fenoulhet, the music composed by Alfred Oakey (London: John Turner, [c.1845])

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/6055198

The Crystal Palace waltzes, composed for the piano forte by Alfred Oakey (London: John Oakey's, n.d.)

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/6055318


Bibliography and resources:

Anne Doggett, "And for harmony most ardently we long": musical life in Ballarat 1851-1871 (Ph.D thesis, University of Ballarat, 2006)

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/210671310 

http://researchonline.federation.edu.au/vital/access/HandleResolver/1959.17/36298 

Alfred Oakley [recte "Alfred Oakey"], Design and Art Australia Online (DAAO)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.party-1482912





OAKEY, Charles (Charles OAKEY)

Comic vocalist, songwriter

Active Beechworth, VIC, 1857
Active Sydney, NSW, 1863, Grenfall, NSW, 1867

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Charles+Oakey+comic+vocalist (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OAKEY-Charles (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], Ovens and Murray Advertiser (1 August 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113016204 

COME AND HEAR OAKEY'S NEW SONG, "The Local Court Election." EVERY EVENING, AT THE STAR THEATRE.

[Advertisement], Ovens and Murray Advertiser (11 August 1857), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113016313 

STAR HOTEL CONCERT ROOM. FORD STREET, BEECHWORTH.
OPEN ON MONDAY EVENING, JULY 27. CONCERT EVERY EVENING.
MADAME HAIMBERGER and Mademoiselle Kramer, the Celebrated Alpine and Tyrolese Minstrels and Monsieur Haimberger, the Violin and Solo Player will perform . . .
Assisted by our old friends Messrs. Harrison, Percy, and Oakey. Pianist - Mr. SAQUI . . .
A Free Concert On every TUESDAY, THURSDAY and FRIDAY, when Messrs Harrison, Percy & Oakey
Will enlighten and amuse all who may favor them with their attendance.

"ODE TO PRINCE ALFRED", The Mining Record and Grenfell General Advertiser (11 July 1868), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article130957561 





OATEN, John (John OATEN; J. OATEN; Johnny OATEN)

English concertina player, minstrel, musician

Born London, England, ? 10 August 1837; son of John OATEN (1802-1866) and Charlotte Anne PELLETT (1803-1862)
Arrived Melbourne, VIC, 10 June 1854 (per Luconia, from London, 2 January 1854; with parents, aged 16)
Active Australia and NZ, by 1862
Married Margaret ANDERSON, Sydney, NSW, 1 August 1864
Departed (last) Sydney, NSW, c. 1877 (for NZ)
Died Dunedin, NZ, 10 October 1887

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=John+Oaten+d1887 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OATEN-John (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"Shipping Intelligence. ARRIVED", Nelson Examiner (21 May 1862), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NENZC18620521.2.3

May 19 . . . ship Eli Whitney, 605, Torrance, from Melbourne. Passengers - Messrs. Howson, Chittenden, Oaten, Braham, Clark, Cowan, Mrs. Chittenden, Mr. and Mrs. Dalrymple.

"THE COURT MINSTRELS", The Maitland Mercury (7 May 1863), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18695274

This talented company is now on a visit to Singleton, and were for the first time most enthusiastically received last evening in the large room of the Rose Inn by a crowded audience . . . The banjo solo by Leathwood, introducing the Marseillaise and Rule Britannia, was very creditably executed as was also a solo on the English concertina by Oaten . . .

"MARRIAGES", The Sydney Morning Herald (10 August 1864), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13105608

On the 1st instant, at 105, Prince-street, by special license, by the Rev. John Reid, of the Mariners' Church, John Oaten, native of London, England, to Margaret Anderson, daughter of Walter Anderson, Sydney, New South Wales.

"ST. JAMES'S HALL", Empire (16 May 1870), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63107112

. . . The famous Oaten, who charms the ear of listeners by his manipulation on the English concertina, is somewhat marvellous in his playing . . .

"DEATH BY SCALDING", Evening News (25 July 1870), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article107125275

Charlotte Louisa Maud, aged nine months, daughter of Mr. J. Oaten, well known in musical circles, was accidentally scalded on Friday evening, and expired at a quarter-past two o'clock this morning. It seems that the infant was playing before the fire with her brother of five years of age, and he by some means capsized the boiler, the contents of which went over the deceased. Dr. Nolan was called in, and prescribed for her. The child seemed to go on all right until about ten o'clock on Saturday night, when convulsions set in, and Dr. Fortescue was sent for, who has given the necessary certificate as to the cause of death.

"TEMPERANCE HALL", Empire (8 August 1870), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63109990

On Thursday night the English concertina performer, Mr. J. Oaten, takes a complimentary benefit at the Temperance Hall, tendered by several professional and amateur vocalists. The recipient has been many years known in the "Minstrel Bands," and was formerly one of the leading members of the Court and Campbell Minstrels. As Mr. Oaten has suffered lately by sustaining a family bereavement, a crowded house would not only on that account be acceptable, but it would serve at the same time as a mark of appreciation of his talent as a musician, and reward him for the many charitable benefits he has gratuitously given his services to.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (16 March 1875), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13353499

ST. GEORGE'S HALL . . . Mr. JOHN OATEN, TONIGHT . . .

"CONCERT", Otago Daily Times (1 October 1881), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18811001.2.22

The second annual concert of the Excelsior Cricket Club was given in the Temperance Hall last evening, and was well attended . . . Mr. J. Oaten gave two capital concertina solos, and Mr. S. Johnston danced a hornpipe . . .

"LARCENY AS BAILEE", Otago Daily Times (26 January 1884), 4

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18840126.2.28

John Oaten was charged that, being the bailee of an English concertina, value £8, the property of William Benjamin Eyre, he did, on the 19th inst., feloniously convert the same to his own use. The accused pleaded guilty, and in order to enable the case to be dealt with summarily, the specified value of the article was reduced to £5. Detective Henderson said that the complainant had shown a good deal of kindness to the accused, but the latter had proved ungrateful. On several occasions complainant had lent his concertina to the accused, who had pawned it, and the complainant had had to release it. The complainant wished that the accused should be dealt leniently with, as he had a family to support. The accused was a quiet, inoffensive man, and his present trouble was occasioned by drink. The Bench consented to take a lenient view of the case, and sentenced the accused to seven days' imprisonment.

"RETURNS OF PRISONERS REPORTED AS DICHARGED", New Zealand Police Gazette (20 February 1884), 34

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/61563/fl26009173 (PAYWALL)

[Gaol] Dunedin / John Oaten / [tried] Dunedin / larceny as a bailee / 7 days' labour / [native of] London / musician / [Born] 1838 / [height] 5 6 / [hair] brown, turning grey / [eyes] grey / [nose] pointed / [mouth] medium / [chin] medium / Scar on left side of neck at back.

Otago, cemetery records

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/60547/43391_344175-07216/1669205 (PAYWALL)

4151 / OATEN John. Died Oct 10 1887, aged 50. A musician, resident of Filleul Street. Born London, lived 11 years in New Zealand. Last came from Sydney, New South Wales. Buried Oct 13. Informant J. Gillies.

"DEATHS", Otago Daily Times (2 November 1887), 5

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/ODT18871102.2.44

OATEN - On the 10th October, at his residence, Filleul-street, Dunedin, John Oaten, musician, the beloved husband of Margaret Oaten; in his 51st year. Deeply regretted. Sydney and Melbourne papers please copy.





OATES, Thomas (Thomas OATES)

Vocalist, singing class instructor

Active Melbourne, VIC, 1850s

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OATES-Thomas (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Argus (5 October 1858), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7302222

IN considering the present vacancy of Incumbent of St. Mark's parish, we, the undersigned seatholders and others regularly attending, and, therefore, deeply interested in the appointment . . .
William Oates, 31 Johnston-street.
Eliza Oates, 31 Johnston-street.
Thomas Oates, 31 Johnston street . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (12 December 1859), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5693433 

MR. OATES'S COLLINGWOOD GLEE COMPANY. - A miscellaneous CONCERT, under the patronage of G. M. Stephen, Esq, M.L.A.; C. J. Don, Esq., M.L.A., and the Municipal Council of East Collingwood, will be held in the National Hall, King William-street, THIS (Monday) EVENING, December 12. Principal soloists - Miss S. Mortley, Master Johnson, Mr. Izard, Mr. Amory, and Mr. Wilson. Pianist - Miss Smith. Doors open at 7 o'clock; to commence precisely at half-past. Tickets, 2s, each ; reserved scats, 3s. 6d.

"THE NEWS OF THE DAY", The Age (7 July 1860), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article154843961 

Last evening a miscellaneous concert was held at St. Mark's, School-room, George-street, Fitzroy, for the purpose of raising funds to assist in liquidating the debt on St. Mark's church. The concert, which was numerously attended, was given by Mr. T. Oates' singing class, assisted by Miss Mortley, the Misses Watson, and Messrs. Izard, Amery, and Wilson; Messrs. Ashton and Litolff presiding at the piano . . .

"Funeral notices", The Argus (14 June 1873), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5865240 





OBBARD, Harriet = Mrs. Cornelius DENNING




O'BRIAN, Patrick (Patrick O'BRIAN)

Vocalist (St. Patrick's Church choir)

Active Melbourne, VIC, 1866

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O'BRIAN-Patrick (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"CITY COURT", The Argus (5 October 1866), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5775149

Patrick O'Brien was charged by Charles Treacey, who said that he was a professor of music, with violently assaulting him. Both parties were connected with the choir of St. Patrick's Church, and it was from a dispute arising out of matters relative to the choir that the quarrel and assault had taken place. Defendant admitted the charge, and expressed his regret for what had occurred. He was fined 20s., and required to enter into his own recognisance in £20 to keep the peace for three months.

ASSOCIATIONS: Charles Tracy





O'CLARAGH, Henry George (Henry George O'CLARAGH; H. G. O'CLARAGH; Mr. O'CLARAGH; CLARAGH)

Actor, vocalist

Active Launceston, VDL (TAS), 1842-45

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Henry+George+O'Claragh (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O'CLARAGH-Henry-George (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

6 September 1842, George Duly's concert, Olympic Theatre, Launceston

[Advertisement], Launceston Courier (5 September 1842), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84673942

GRAND CONCERT!!
MR. G. F. DULY, begs most respectfully to inform the inhabitants of Launceston and its vicinity, that his Musical Melange will take place on Tuesday, the 6th September, when he trusts he may meet with their kind patronage and support.
Programme.
PART I.
Overture - Tancredi.
Duet, ("We have lived and loved together,") Mrs. ARABIN and Mr. DULY.
Song, ("Flying Dutchman,") Mr. BOYD.
Glee, ("Fairy Elves,") Messrs. CLARAGH, DULY, and ROGERS.
Song, ("On Wi the Tartan,") Mrs. ARABIN.
Song, ("They have given thee to another,") Mr. DULY.
Song, ("The Gipsying Party,") Mr. ROGERS.
Song, ("Gay Young Irish Gentleman,") Mr. WATSON.
Trio, ("Woodman Spare that Tree,") Messrs. THOMPSON, ROGERS, and DULY; arranged by Mr. Duly.
Waltzes - Aurora.
PART II.
Waltzes - La Rose.
Song, ("Lake of Como,")- Mrs. ARABIN.
Solo - (Flute,) - Mr. DULY.
Song, ("Jolly Nose,") - Mr. BOYD.
Song, ("the Unfortunate Man,") Mr. ROGERS.
Song, ("The Pirate,") - Mr. DULY.
Duet, (Violin and Piano-forte,) Messrs. CLARAGH and DULY.
Song, ("Softly blow ye breezes,") Mrs. ARABIN.
Glee, ("Here's a Health to all Good Lasses,") by Mrs. ARABIN; Messrs. DULY & ROGERS.
Overture, (L'ltaliana in Algeri.)
The whole to conclude with the Musical Farce of JENNY JONES.
Boxes, 6s. Pit, 4s. 6d.
Doors open at half-past seven; to commence at eight precisely.
Tickets to be obtained of Mr. Watson, Olympic Theatre, London Inn; and of Mr. Cozens, Chemist.

[Advertisement], Launceston Examiner (19 October 1842), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36250285

Mr. H. G. O'Claragh's Benefit.
ROYAL OLYMPIC THEATRE. - On Friday evening next, Oct. 21, will be performed the magnificent melodrame in two acts, entitled
Peerless Pool; or, the Early Days of RICHARD THE THIRD.
Richard the Third, Mr. Arabin.
Tableaux vivant introduced - 1. Murder of Henry Sixth in the Tower; 2. Murder of the Princes: 3. Battle of Bosworth Field, Richard the Third's death.
Comic dance by Messrs. Opie, Elmar, and amateur.
Comic song, composed and sung by H. G. O'Claragh, "The Beautiful Land of Australia," accompanied by himself on the violin.
To conclude with the laughable, mirth-in-spiring, and side-cracking farce, entitled
JOSEPH SHARK; OR, THE LAWYER'S FACTOTUM.
Boxes, six shillings; Pit, four shillings and four-pence.

[Advertisement], Launceston Examiner (19 March 1845), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36239447 

NOTICE. - I hereby caution the public generally not to give credit to any person on my behalf, or to pay any debts due to me without my written authority; particularly to Henry George O'Claragh; as I will not be answerable for the same.
MATTHEW CHANDLER. Westbury, March 10.





O'CONNELL, Mary (Mary BLIGH; Mrs. Mary PUTLAND; Lady O'CONNELL)

Patron of music, amateur pianist, governor's daughter (Bligh)

Born Douglas, Isle of Man, 1 April 1783 (daughter of William BLIGH)
First Australian stay, 1806-14 (as Mrs. John PUTLAND, and from 1810 as Mrs. Maurice O'CONNELL)
Second Australian stay, 1838-48 (as Lady O'CONNELL)
Died Gloucester, England, 10 December 1863

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136435313 (NLA persistent identifier)

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Mary+Bligh+Putland+O'Connell+1783-1863 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O'CONNELL-Mary (shareable link to this entry)


Summary:

Meeting Mrs. Putland on his arrival in the colony in 1810, Ellis Bent described her as:

very clever, & accomplished, & plays remarkably well on the piano forte.


Bibliography and recources:

Robert Jordan, "Music and civil society in New South Wales, 1788-1809", Journal of the Royal Australian Historical Society 98/2 (December 2012), 205, 210 note 66

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/178684444 

http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=060857840144157;res=IELHSS (PAYWELL)





O'CONNOR, William (William O'CONNOR; Billy CONNERS)

Violinist

Died Gundagai, NSW, 1906

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O'CONNOR-William (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"ALL ABOUT PEOPLE", The Gundagai Independent and Pastoral, Agricultural and Mining Advocate (13 October 1906), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article120260719

Writes '"H. N. T.":- There died in the Gundagai hospital last week a man who was known out back for a number of years past. I refer to Mr. Wm. O'Connor, or "Billy Conners," as he was more generally known. Billy was a man who had seen better days, being fairly educated and well-read. He was very fond of the violin, and could play this instrument well, and was never really happy unless he had the bow in his hand and was rattling off a jig or a schottische. Mr. Connors, who was a quiet and unassuming man, had been a martyr to bronchial asthma for a number of years, but during the winter this developed into acute pneumonia, which eventually carried him off. Mr. O'Connor, who has relatives well-to-do at Dubbo, was a cousin of Mr. Justice O'Connor of the Fed. High Court. Of poor old "Billy" it may truly be said - "After life's fitful fever, he sleeps well."




ODRICH, Mr. (Mr. ODRICH)

Musician, flautist, flute player

Active Melbourne, VIC, 1849

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#ODRICH (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Melbourne Daily News (14 June 1849), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226472965 

GRAND CONCERT, Under the Immediate patronage of His Honor the Superintendent and His Worship the Mayor.
MR. J. GRIFFITHS has the honor to announce that his CONCERT of vocal and instrumental music will take place at the room of the Mechanic's Institute,
THIS EVENING, JUNE 14TH.
On which occasion the Amateurs connected with the Musical Society have kindly given their services - together with several distinguished amateur vocalists. To render the orchestra full and complete, Mr. G. has engaged all the available talent of Melbourne.
Leader of the band - Mr. Megson
Solo violin - Mr. Griffiths
Solo pianoforte - Mr. Anderson
Solo flute - Mr. Odrich
Accompanyist - Mr. Pietzker.
PROGRAMME.
Part 1.
Overture - "Guy Mannering" - H. R. Bishop . . .
Duett - Flute and pianoforte, "Rondo Brilliante," Op. 14, Messrs. Pietzker and Odrich - Hoffmeister . . .
Overture - Cheval de Bronze - Auberv Part 2.
Overture - "Fra Diavolo" - Auber . . .




OELMANN, Hermann (Hermann OELMANN; Hermann Adolph Theodore OELMANN; OEHLMANN)

Tenor vocalist, musician, draper, publican

Born Brunswick, Germany, c.1840
Arrived Adelaide, SA, 7 September 1857 (per Peter Godeffroy, from Hamburg)
Died Adelaide, SA, 25 January 1889, aged 48

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Hermann+Oelmann+d1889 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OELMANN-Hermann (shareable link to this entry)


Summary:

Oelmann arrived in South Australia, with his elder sister Wilhelmina, in 1857 on the Peter Godeffroy, with several other musicians including Theodor Heydecke and his brother, and Heinrich Schrader (who Wilhelmina later married). He was about 18 years of age at the time of his first solo concert appearances for Cesare Cutolo in November 1859, and the following month he participated in the first public performance of Carl Linger's The song of Australia.


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (1 November 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1198764

CONCERT under the PATRONAGE of the SOUTH AUSTRALIAN VOLUNTEERS. On TUESDAY, the 8th of November . . . Signor Cutolo will be assisted by the following Artistes: - Mrs. Perryman, Miss Rowe, Miss Bryan (her second appearance), Mr. Daniel, Mr. Christen, and Mr. Hermann Oelmann, tenor (his first appearance) . . .

[Advertisement], The South Australian Advertiser (8 November 1859), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1198990 

. . . PROGRAMME. PART I . . . 4. "Mein Engel" (H. Esser) - Mr. Hermann Oelmann . . .

"SIGNOR CUTOLO'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (5 November 1859), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49825647

. . . A new tenor, in the person of Mr. Oelmann, also added to the attractions of the evening . . .

"GRAND CONCERT AT THE GAWLER INSTITUTE", The South Australian Advertiser (14 December 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200209

. . . "Dearest Home" was then sung by Mr. Oehlmann, after which the "Prize Song of Australia" was introduced, numerous copies of the words and music having been previously distributed throughout the room . . .

"THE SOUTH AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE SOIREE", The South Australian Advertiser (15 December 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1200228 

. . . Miss Rowe and Mr. Oehlmann sung a very pretty duet, "Slowly and Softly," and the chorus "The Song of Australia" was given very effectively by the Deutsche Liedertafel . . .

"Concert", Süd Australische Zeitung (4 October 1862), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article83805533

"DEATHS", South Australian Register (27 November 1879), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43092233

"DEATHS, South Australian Register (26 January 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47056301

OELMANN - On the 25th January, at his late Residence, Rundle-street. Hermann Oelmann, the beloved husband of Mrs. H. Oelmann, aged 48 years. Deeply regretted by all.

"OBITUARY", South Australian Register (28 January 1889), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article47053193

Mr. Hermann Adolph Theodore Oelmann, the noted tenor singer, who was well known and much respected throughout South Australia, aged 48; a native of Brunswick, Germany, and came to the colony about 1857; leaves a widow, three sons, and a daughter.

"Our Adelaide Letter", The Inquirer & Commercial News (15 February 1889), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66090682

Yesterday [27 January] there was consigned to his final rest one whom possibly many of your readers may have known, whose remarkably fine voice many may have heard - Mr. Hermann Oelmann, formerly, I believe, a partner in the firm of G. & R. Wills & Co., latterly of the King of Hanover Hotel. As a musician he never grudged his services to any good cause, and thousands assembled to pay the last tribute of respect to his memory. The Liedertafel, of which he was a member sang Mendelssohn's beautiful, "It is decreed," in the chamber of their departed friend, ere they bore their old comrade's coffin to the hearse. In the funeral cortege the members of the United Order of Odd fellows led the way, while the Liedertafel, headed by their banner draped with crape, followed the hearse; over a hundred mourning and private carriages, containing the relatives and friends of the deceased, coming next, whilst the streets were thronged with pedestrians who accompanied the mournful procession to the cemetery. The Rev. J. C. Woods conducted the service at the grave, the Liedertafel singing with much pathos "Grabe's Ruha" [sic] at their commencement, and ere turning away from the open grave, the appropriate song " Sleep well our comrade." Many members of the Masonic fraternity, of which Mr. Oelmann was a brother, were present.




OFFOR, John (John OFFOR; Mr. OFFER; Mr. HOFFER)

Former London bookseller and publisher, colonial public servant, amateur musician, violoncello player, artist

Born Cripplegate, London, England, 16 January 1789; son of George OFFER and Mary ANDREWS
Married (1) Jemima BARRACLOUGH (1798-1826), London, 1819
Arrived Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 3 January 1829 (per Persian, from London, 25 August 1828)
Married (2) Madelina CRAIG (d. 1846), St. David's, Hobart Town, 14 May 1835
Died Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 10 July 1848

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=John+Offor+1789-1848 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OFFOR-John (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

Dr. Williams's Library, register of non-conformist births, 1792-1805; UK National Archives

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/2972/40612_B0151972-00148 (PAYWALL)

[No.] 837 / John Offor, Liberty of the Tower Without . . . Reg'd Jan. 27, 1797 . . . [son of]
George Offor, and Mary, daughter of John Andrews / . . . [born] 16 Jan. 1789

Freedom of the city of London, John Offor, 2 November 1818; London Metropolitan Archives

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/2052/32512_a064219-00831 (PAYWALL)

The Plate Workers, London / November 2nd. 1818 / . . .
John Offor of No. 44 Newgate St. London, Bookseller was admitted with the Freedom of this Company by patrimony and sworn . . .
John Offor Son of George Offor . . . born 1789 . . .

[Notice], The London Gazette (1 May 1819), 762

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=fK1PAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA762 

London, January 1819. We beg to give notice, that the Partnership between us, as Booksellers, at 44, Newgate-Street, and 2, Postern-Row, Tower-Hill, was dissolved by mutual consent at Christmas last - The business at 44, Newgate-Street will be conducted and is the sole property of John Ossor, and that at 2, Postern-Row, Tower-Hill, of George Offor, jun. We wave further to notice that the settlement of the accounts of our late Partnership is confided to Mr. William Aikin, at 44, Newgate-Street,
George Offor, jun.; John Offor; George Offor.

"TRADE AND SHIPPING", The Hobart Town Courier (10 January 1829), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4218797 

Arrived on Saturday the ship Persian, Capt. Robt. Plunkett, from London 25th August . . . Passengers, Mr. and Mrs. Steele, 3 Misses and 2 Masters Steele, Mr. Chas. Bethel Lyons, Mr. John Offor, and 4 Messrs Lindley.

"MR. DEANE'S CONCERT", The Tasmanian (27 August 1830), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article233096631 

On Saturday last, Mr. DEANE gave his concert as advertised in the newspapers . . . The concert commenced with a grand symphony by Stamity [Stamitz]. Mr. Deane presided very ably at the violin, Messrs. Brown and Williams (master of the Band of the 63) seconds, Mr. Bock and Master Deane (a young gentleman only ten years old) tenors, Mr. Hoffer, violoncello, and two horns by excellent performers of the 63rd Band. This beautiful symphony was performed with the greatest effect and received with the warmest applause . . .

The first act closed with a piece from Haydn, by the whole of the performers, and the second act opened with another piece of that celebrated master . . . Mr. Pemfriest then sung in a manner which surprised the whole assembly and called for an universal encore, the beautiful Scots song "Hey the bonnie" . . . A beautiful Quartetto from Haydn then followed by Mr. Deane the Violin, Mr. Marshall the Flute, Mr. Bock the Tenor, and Mr. Hoffer the Violoncello. It was admirably executed and the performance closed with Weber's celebrated "Huntsmen's Chorus from Der Frieschutz," with the chorus, which called forth the loudest and most merited applause . . .

[News], The Hobart Town Courier (4 July 1834), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4184337 

On Friday evening a delightful entertainment was given by a party of young gentlemen to a large and highly respectable company at the Freemasons' tavern. The amusements commenced with the performance of Home's classic tragedy of Douglas, enacted to the life by the amateur party on the little stage recently occupied by Mr. Cameron . . . Mr. Reichenberg, Mr. Offer, Mr. Deane and sons, Mr. Russel and others assisted in the orchestra. An excellent supper was provided for the occasion, and the dancing was kept up till a late hour. No entertainment in the colony was ever more rationally conducted or passed off more pleasantly.

Marriages solemnized in the parish of Hobart Town . . . in the year 1835; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:821515; RGD36/1/2 no 2747

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/821515 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD36-1-2$init=RGD36-1-2p176 

No. 840 / John Offer of this Parish Widower and
Madelina Craig of this Parish Widow were
married in this Church by License . . . this [14 May 1835] . . .

"DEATH", The Observer (24 February 1846), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article62137083 

DIED. - On the 22nd instant, at New Town, MADELINA SANDILANDS, the beloved wife of Mr. JOHN OFFOR, of the Audit Offîce.




O'FLAHERTY, Henry Charles (Henry Charles O'FLAHERTY; H. C. O'FLAHERTY)

Musician, professor of the violin and Spanish guitar, guitarist, violinist, vocalist, member of the theatrical band, actor, manager, playwright, comic vocalist

Born England, c. 1819
Arrived Sydney, NSW, by July 1840
Married Eliza WINSTANLEY, St. James's church, Sydney, NSW, 1841
Departed Sydney, NSW, 1 April 1846 (per Kinnear, for London)
Died London, England; buried Highgate Cemetery, 3 November 1854, aged 35

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Henry+Charles+O'Flaherty  (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O'FLAHERTY-Henry-Charles (shareable link to this entry)

O'FLAHERTY, Mrs. (Mrs. O'FLAHERTY) = Eliza WINSTANLEY

Actor, vocalist, author

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Eliza+Winstanley+O'Flaherty (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://nla.gov.au/nla.party-634192 (NLA persistent identifier)


Summary:

In July and August 1840, O'Flaherty widely advertised his commencement in Sydney as a "professor of the violin and Spanish guitar". He probably joined the theatre orchestra around this time, for by December it was evidently well known that he and the actor Eliza Winstanley were to marry. On 30 December, a local youth, thought to have been in the pit at the theatre that night, threatened Eliza as she left the theatre at about midnight. O'Flaherty intervened to protect her. Brought to court the following morning, the defendant Charles Davis, "a lad about sixteen years of age, a native of the colony" was reported to have been wearing a "cabbage-tree hat".

This tale of theatrical chivalry inspired the Monitor to print that same day, the first part of a humorous poem on "The battle of the Cabbage-tree", in which O'Flaherty was cast as "The Knight of the Fiddle, Champion of the fair Eliza . . . (not his first appearance in that character)". Richard Fotheringham suggested that the author may have been O'Flaherty himself. The couple were married at St. James's, Sydney, on 6 February 1841, and Eliza is first referred to in the press as Mrs. O'Flaherty shortly afterward.

O'Flaherty is listed among the theatre band for Maria Prout's concert in March 1841, made his stage debut in character at Eliza's benefit in May, and was in the band again for Isaac Nathan's oratorio in July. On 9 July he left for Hobart to join Eliza at the theatre there. At Eliza's benefit in August, Henry:

. . . on the Spanish Guitar, shewed that he was a master of the instrument, although it was in such bad order, that he was unable to go through with his Solo, to the great disappointment of all present.

Henry took his benefit later that month before the company departed for Launceston. Back in Sydney in February 1842, he was declared insolvent. By May 1842, he had taken over as manager of the Olympic Theatre. Having finally been discharged finally from insolvency in March 1846, the couple left for London on 1 April. Though they were reported at the time to be only visiting England, they in fact never returned to Australia. Henry died in London in 1854, aged just 35.


Documentation:

Sydney, NSW (July 1840 to 9 July 1841):

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (27 July 1840), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32184141

MR. H. C. O'FLAHERTY, PROFESSOR OF THE VIOLIN AND SPANISH GUITAR,
RESPECTFULLY beg leave to inform the gentry of Sydney, that it is his intention to commence giving instructions on the above fashionable instruments.
For cards of address, &c., please to apply to Mr. Ellard's Music Saloon, George-street, Sydney.

"BREACH OF THE PEACE", Australasian Chronicle (31 December 1840), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31730323

Yesterday Charles Davies, a lad about sixteen years of age, a native of the colony, appeared on summons at the police office, to answer the charge of Miss E. Winstanley for a breach of the peace. It appeared from the evidence of Miss Winstanley, that on Saturday night last when she left the theatre, about twelve o'clock, the defendant, and a number of other youths about his own age, began to abuse her and call her ill names; and one of them took off Davies' "cabbage tree hat" and threw it at Miss W. Her sister, to avoid treading upon it, put it aside with her foot, when the youths commenced a volley of the most indecent and disgusting abuse, upon which Miss W. said that the defendant, who appeared to be foremost, was an impudent young blackguard, and told him to go about his business; Davies then said if she was not a woman he would kick her; Miss Winstanley also stated that for nearly four years past she had been annoyed by the defendant in a similar manner, and he had abused her almost every night during the present season. Mr. Henry O'Flaherty saw the defendant and the other lads making a disturbance, and observed that a hat was thrown at the Misses Winstanley; he also heard the defendant threaten to kick Miss Winstanley. He not only said that if she was not a woman he would kick her, but that he had a good mind to do so, which Mr. O'Flaherty said he believed defendant would have done had not he and another gentleman been present; so persuaded was he that they would have ill used Miss W., that he and the gentleman who was with him attended the ladies home . . .

"THESPIS IN AUSTRALIA, OR, THE STAGE IN DANGER", The Sydney Monitor (31 December 1840), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32187738

"The battle of the Cabbage-Tree, A POEM. CANTO I. THE ASSAULT", The Sydney Monitor (6 January 1841), 2

ttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32187835

"The battle of the Cabbage-Tree, A POEM. CANTO II. THE BANQUET", The Sydney Monitor (11 January 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32187889

"ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (18 February 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2552558

. . . The female performers, amongst whom we caught a glimpse of Mrs. O'Flaherty, gay and happy as a lark, sustained their parts tolerably well . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (24 March 1841), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32188716

GRAND CONCERT . . . MRS. J. S. PROUT, Pianist . . .
VICTORIA THEATRE, THIS EVENING, the 24th instant.
She will be assisted by Mrs. Bushelle, Mr. Bushelle, Mr. Worgan, several Vocal Amateurs,
Mr. S. W. Wallace, Mr. T. Leggatt, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Deane, Mr. E. Deane, Mr. Sippe, Mr. Walton,
Mr. O'Flaherty, Mr. Curtis, Mr. Portbury, Mr. Pappin, Mr. Downes, and other Members of the Theatrical Orchestral . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (6 May 1841), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12869010

FOR THE BENEFIT OF MRS. O'FLAHERTY, LATE MISS WINSTANLEY . . .
that the above evening's entertainment will commence with, for the first time in this Colony,
an interesting Drama, entitled GWYNNETH VAUGHAN; OR, THE VILLAGE COQUETTE . . .
Morgan Morgan, boatswain of the Telemachus, MR. O'FLAHERTY . . .
GWYNNETH VAUGHAN, the Village Coquette, MRS. O'FLAHERTY . . .

"Summary of Public Intelligence", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (6 May 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2553245

. . . This evening Mrs. O'Flaherty's benefit comes off; from the popularity of this talented actress, we doubt not she will be most effectively patronized. Mr. O'Flaherty makes his debut on this occasion - with what success is yet to be seen; courage, say we . . .

"Royal Victoria Theatre", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (11 May 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2553276 

On Thursday evening last, we paid our usual visit lo the Theatre; being the benefit night of our must talented actress, Mrs. O'Flaherty, we anticipated no ordinary treat. Though not a "bumper," we are glad to say that the house was tolerably well filled; the dress boxes and pit especially, were crowded to the extreme. The play was "Gwynneth Vaughan," one of those namby pamby productions, without either interest or plot - one of those lackadaisical, love stories, where a lovers' quarrel, ends in the pettish swain going to sea, and after the usual absence, returns, finds his lady love mad, and most wonderful marries her! On this occasion Mr. O'Flaherty made his debut, and we must say, without flattery, in a most creditable manner; we heartily congratulate Mr. O'F. for the style in which he acted "the Boatswain." We must as cordially admit, that we were most agreeably disappointed in his acting, being impressed, we can't tell why or how, that he would "break down." We will not bespatter Mr. O'Flaherty with praise, for as might only be expected, there is great room for improvement; still we should be sorry to class him with such men of straw as our worthy favorite? Master Peat . . .

"The Oratorio", The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (2 July 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32189723 

This Festival, to which the musical portion of the community of the colony had been looking forward for so long a time with the greatest interest, took place in St. Mary's Cathedral, on Wednesday the 30th ultimo . . . INSTRUMENTAL PERFORMERS. Mrs. Prout, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Leggatt, Mr. Deane, Mr. John Deane, Mr. Edward Deane, Mr. William Deane, Mr. Wallace, sen., Mr. O'Flaherty, Mr. Portbury, Mr. Sippe, Mr. Meyer, Mr. Strong, and Mr. Walton . . . The whole under the entire management of Mr. Nathan, who presided at the organ . . .

"DEPARTURES", Australasian Chronicle (10 July 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31732244

9. - For Hobart Town, the schooner Sisters, Captain Clark, with sundries. Passengers - Mrs. Hill, Messrs. J. Moses, J. Barnett, Hammond, and Lawson; steerage, Mr. and Mrs. Frayne, and Mr. O'Flaherty.

Tasmania (July to December 1841):

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE. PORT OF HOBART TOWN. Arrivals. . .", The Courier (9 July 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2956018 

8 - the schooner Marian Watson, 140 tons, Richards, from Sydney, 20th June - passengers, Mrs. Flaherty, and three in the steerage.

"THEATRE", The Courier (30 July 1841), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2955910 

Mrs. O'Flaherty made her second appearance on our boards last evening, and was greeted with an extremely good house. We have not further space than to notice that the lady sustained the difficult character of Helen Macgregor, in Rob Roy, with great precision and judgment. We believe it is Mrs. O'Flaherty's intention, previous to her departure, to engage the house for one night; and as Mr. O'F.'s musical talents are highly spoken of, (who will perform on the occasion,) the public may anticipate a very pleasant evening's amusement.

"THE THEATRE", Colonial Times (10 August 1841), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8751940

Mrs. O'Flaherty's benefit took place, to a very respectable house, last evening. The Tower of Nesle and the Petticoat Colonel being the pieces, which were remarkably well performed. Mr. Galt, on the Slack Rope, really astonished the folks; and Mr. O'Flaherty, on the Spanish Guitar, shewed that he was a master of the instrument, although it was in such bad order, that he was unable to go through with his Solo, to the great disappointment of all present.

"THEATRE", The Courier (13 August 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2955834 

. . . Mr. O'Flaherty is also a star in our theatrical region; his acting of the part of Captain Buridan was uniformly discreet and intelligent throughout; he, however, evidently is not quite at home in his vocation; we would nevertheless augur that "avec le temps" he will make an excellent performer. But we must not in Hobart Town be critical; we should rather briefly say that such truly respectable performances as those of Monday last but seldom are afforded to our gude town. The guitar performance unfortunately proved a failure, owing to the quality of the instrument; this is the more to be regretted as Mr. O'Flaherty is evidently an unusually good player . . .

[Advertisement], Colonial Times (17 August 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8751978 

ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE . . . LAST NIGHT OF THE SEASON . . . POSTPONED TO Monday, 23rd August . . .
The Evening's Entertainment will commence with the interesting Drama, in two Acts, entitled the MENDICANT,
TO BE FOLLOWED BY, Song, "The Admiral," Mr. O'Flaherty, who will accompany himself on the Guitar . . .

"THEATRE", The Courier (27 August 1841), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2955729

To afford Mr. O'Flaherty an opportunity of taking a benefit, this place of amusement will reopen on Monday next, (previous to the company's departure for Launceston the following day,) when will be performed the interesting melodrama of Caroline Leslie, or the Emigrant's Daughter, and How to Die for Love. Mr. Fowell Courtier, the celebrated Fire King and Necromancer, just arrived from Launceston, will make his appearance on this occasion, and who will go through the whole of his astonishing feats.

"THEATRE", Launceston Courier (22 November 1841), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84674675 

This evening (last in order, though far from least in merit,) Mr. O'Flaherty will take his benefit, upon which occasion, we hope to have the pleasure of witnessing a full house. The selection for the evening are Matfie Falcone, the Siamese Twins, two pieces which have never been played before, on this side of the Island, and the Robber's Wife, which has been introduced by particular desire of several parties, who were present when it was performed on a previous occasion. In this piece Mrs. O'Flaherty plays the part of Rose Redland, the robber's wife, a character in which she appears to great advantage. This will positively be the last night of performance but one, as Mr. Watson, has advertised the re-opening of the season at Hobart Town, on the first of December.

Sydney, NSW (January 1842 to October 1843):

"THEATRICAL NEWS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 January 1842), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2555412 

It is confidently asserted, that both Mrs. O'Flaherty and Mrs. Ximenes (better known as the Misses Winstanley) will be engaged, next season, by the proprietor of the Victoria. Mr. O'Flaherty, it is said, will also appear next season. Rumour speaks highly of the improvement in the histrionic performance of this gentleman.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 February 1842), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2555673 

Australian Olympic Theatre, HUNTER-STREET.
SIGNOR DALLE CASE most respectfully informs his friends and the public generally . . . that, anxious to deserve their increasing patronage, he has formed engagements, for the ensuing season, with MR. & MRS. KNOWLES, MR. & MRS. O'FLAHERTY, MRS. XIMENES, MRS. LARRA . . .

"In the Insolvent Estate of Henry Charles O'Flaherty", New South Wales Government Gazette (18 February 1842), 293

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article230660805

"INSOLVENT ESTATES", The Sydney Herald (19 February 1842), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12873807

H. C. O'Flaherty [Date of surrender] Feb. 14 . . .

"INSOLVENT ESTATES", The Sydney Herald (3 March 1842), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12873976 

Henry Charles O'Flaherty . . . [Debts] £198 4s. ; [Credit . . .] £20; [Balance Deficiency . . .] £178 4

[Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (17 May 1842), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12875212

"CONCERT FOR THE BENEVOLENT ASYLUM", The Sydney Herald (11 July 1842), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12876089 

. . . Mr. O'Flaherty was encored in his guitar solo, which pleased us very much . . .

"THEATRE", Australasian Chronicle (23 August 1842), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31736951 

On Saturday evening, the new drama entitled "Isabel of Valois, or the Tyrant Queen," written by Mr. O'Flaherty, was, for the second time, performed at the Victoria Theatre. The house was very thinly attended. Mrs. O'Flaherty sustained the character of Isabel, in her usual effective manner, but the rest of the performers, with the exception of Mr. Simmons, as the Count de Foix, appeared to go through their parts with great carelessness, and required the assistance of the prompter for almost every word they uttered. The drama itself is not devoid of interest; it is one which will bear repetition; and though, as a literary production, it is scarcely above mediocrity, yet, as a first attempt, it does considerable credit to its author. The plot of the piece is simple and natural: - Philip, King of Navarre, an easy and confiding prince, marries Isabel of Valois, an ambitious, intriguing, and licentious princess of the blood royal of France, and brings her to his court at Navarre; among his followers is a young and dissolute noble of France, the Count de Foix, whose licentiousness had gained for him a hateful name in the court he had left, and who had been, and still was, the guilty partner of Isabella's intrigues and amours, the latter having married Philip merely as a cloak for her own loose practices. On coming to the court of Navarre, he is struck with the youth and beauty of Blanche, the king's sister, a virtuous princess, and having vowed to make her the victim of his passions, a quarrel ensues between him and Don Ferdinand, a Navarrese noble, and a duel is fought, in which the Count is severely wounded. He is attended in his illness by Blanche, who not only heals his wounds, but pours the consolations of religion into his mind, and he becomes a changed man, determines to renounce his former practices, to break off his secret intimacy with the Queen, resolves for the future to lead a virtuous life, and ultimately to make Blanche his wife. The Queen, being informed of this, endeavours to persuade the Count to retract his newly formed resolutions, but failing to do so, she becomes enraged, and procures the banishment of Blanche to the Castle of Ronscevalles. The Count becoming acquainted with the place of her confinement, follows her, and obtains admission into the castle, disguised as a minstrel, and succeeds in liberating Blanche from her imprisonment. Soon after their departure, the fact is discovered, and they are pursued and overtaken in a forest; the Count sends Blanche forward by one of his officers, and awaits the arrival of the pursuers, when a battle takes place, and two of the king's officers are slain. He is afterwards unable to find Blanche, and retraces his steps to the court of Navarre, where he arrives just at the time when he is attainted as a traitor and seducer of the king's sister. He asserts his own innocence, and defends the honor of Blanche, for which he is seized, by the orders of Isabel, and condemned to be executed. As he is about to ascend the scaffold, Blanche, who had repaired for protection to the camp of Charles of France, on the frontiers of Navarre, is brought back by Don Ferdinand, and her innocence and that of the Count being made apparent, Isabel, in despair lest her infamous conduct should be discovered, puts an end to her existence by poison, and thus tranquillity is restored to the kingdom of Navarre.

"AUSTRALIAN GRAND LODGE OF THE INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS", The Australian (1 March 1843), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37113900

On Friday last the Brethren at the above assembled at their Lodge Room, (Brother Smith's, "Saracen's Head Inn," King-street,) to celebrate the Seventh Anniversary of the introduction of the Order into Australia, and the establishment of their Lodge . . . A very excellent band attended, the principal performers being Messrs. Gibbs, Gautrot, O'Flaherty, &c. . . .

"DEPARTURES", Australasian Chronicle (4 October 1843), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31741188 

3. - For Twofold Bay, Port Phillip, and Launceston, the steamer Sihamrook, Gilmore, with sundries. Passengers - for Port Phillip . . . Mr. and Mrs. O'Flaherty . . .

Launceston, VDL (TAS) (October to December 1843):

"THINGS THEATRICAL", Melbourne Times (10 October 1843), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226925067 

By the Shamrock we notice the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. O'Flaherty the latter the star of the Sydney stage. We hear it is the intention of this lady and gentleman to proceed to Launceston by the earliest opportunity, the play going folks of Melbourne will therefore for a time be deprived of an opportunity of gratifying their taste by witnessing this lady's performance but in consequence of the strong wish which has been expressed that Mrs. O'Flaherty should for a time grace the Melbourne boards and the liberal inducements which have been held out by our talented and enterprising theatrical manager, it is not improbable, that she may be induced upon the completion of an engagement at Launceston, to again pay Melbourne a visit for the purpose of receiving the well merited plaudits of a Port Phillip audience.

"Launceston Shipping List", The Teetotal Advocate (14 October 1843), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228138743 

October 13 Steamer Shamrock, 200 tons, Gilmore, master, from Sydney and Port Phillip . . . Passengers . . . Mr. O'Flaherty and Mrs. O'Flaherty . . .

"THEATRICAL CHIT-CHAT", The Sydney Record (14 October 1843), 12

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228141497 

The Victoria opened for the Summer Season, on Monday the 19th of Sept. In consequence of the reduction which Mr. Wyatt found it necessary to make, several of the corps engaged during the last season, have either resigned or been discharged. Amongst the former class, are Mr. O'Flaherty the musician, and Mrs. O'Flaherty the actress, who went down by the Shamrock on her last trip to Melbourne, where very considerable encouragement is given to the Drama . . .

"POLICE . . . THE PRESS v. THE STAGE", The Cornwall Chronicle (15 November 1843), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66020003 

Mr. O'Flaherty, a six-foot aspirant for histrionic fame - who, by the redundant quantity of his crisped and golden locks, might have been taken for the brother of Absalom himself - appeared, in propria persona, to answer the complaint of Mr. John Knight, formerly printer and proprietor of the Launceston Advertiser, for the non-payment off £2 8s. 6d., for printing and advertisement . . .

"Shipping Intelligence", Launceston Examiner (29 November 1843), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36235324 

. . . DEPARTURES. November 28.- Steamer, Shamrock, 200 tons, Gilmore, master, for Sydney . . . Passengers . . . Mr. O'Flaherty . . .

"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE . . . CLEARED AT THE CUSTOMS", The Australian (7 December 1843), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37119556 

Dec. 6. - The steamer Shamrock, Gilmore, master, for Port Phillip, via Twofold Bay and Launceston, with sundries . . . Passengers for Launceston, Mrs. Ximines . . . Mr. O'Flaherty . . .

Sydney, NSW (January 1844 to 1 April 1846):

"INSOLVENCY PROCEEDINGS", The Sydney Morning Herald (26 January 1846), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12884911

"Supreme Court. WEDNESAY, MARCH 4, INSOLVENCY JURISDICTION", Morning Chronicle (7 March 1846), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31747502 

. . . The certificate of discharge of Henry Charles O'Flaherty was confirmed by the Court . . .

"MRS. O'FLAHERTY'S FAREWELL BENEFIT", The Spectator (28 March 1846), 117

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article250085141 

This deservedly favorite actress, who is about to visit England, takes a Farewell Benefit at the City Theatre, Market-street, on Monday evening next. We feel assured that we need but draw attention to the announcement, which appears above, to induce our play-going readers to patronise a lady whose attention and exertions in her profession have secured her the approbation and good wishes of the Sydney public.

[Advertisement], The Spectator (28 March 1846), 117

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article250085152 

ROYAL CITY THEATRE. MRS. O'FLHERTY'S FAREWELL BENEFIT. MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 30, 1846 . . . previous to her departure from this colony to England . . . a Solo on the Guitar, by Mr. O'Flaherty, by particular desire . . .

"DEPARTURES", Morning Chronicle (4 April 1846), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31747723

1. - Kinnear, barque, Capt. Veale; for London. Passengers . . . Mr. and Mrs. O'Flaherty . . .

England (from 1846):

"THEATRICALS", Sydney Chronicle (24 April 1847), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31751670

Mrs. O'Flaherty, formerly of the Sydney theatre, made a successful debut at the Manchester theatre in December last. The English papers speak of her in very flattering terms. - P. P. Patriot, April 7.

Burials in the Highgate Cemetery of Saint James', in the Parish of Saint Pancras . . . in the Year 1854; London Metropolitan Archives

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/1559/31547_212656-00280 (PAYWALL)

No. 11360 / Henry Charles O'Flaherty / 3, Gothic Cottages, Park Village East, Regents Park / [buried] Nov'r 3rd / 35 years . . .


Bibliography and resources:

N. M. Robinson, "O'Flaherty, Eliza (1818-1882)", Australian dictionary of biography 2 (1967)

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/oflaherty-eliza-2520

Fotheringham 2006, Australian plays for the colonial stage: 1834-1899, 41-58

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=2mIYkb8NaXYC&pg=PA41 (PREVIEW)




OHLFSEN-BAGGE, Emil (Emil OHLFSEN-BAGGE)

Teacher of piano and singing (Berlin Conservatory of Music)

Active Australia 1871-81

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OHLFSEN-BAGGE-Emil (shareable link to this entry)

OHLFSEN-BAGGE, Dora (Dorothea OHLFSEN-BAGGE; Dora OHLFSEN)

Pianist (pupil of Henri Kowalski), sculptor

Born Ballarat, ? 1867/1870 (daughter of C. H. Ohlfsen-Bagge and his wife Kate)
Died Rome, Italy, 1948

https://nla.gov.au/nla.party-1487661 (NLA persistent identifier)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OHLFSEN-BAGGE-Dora (shareable link to this entry)

OHLFSEN-BAGGE, Rita (Rita OHLFSEN-BAGGE; BAGGÉ)

Pianist


Documentation:

[Advertisement], Bendigo Advertiser (8 June 1871), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87970087

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (3 April 1872), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13255185

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (17 January 1876), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13366485

[Advertisement], The Mercury (12 October 1878), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8969038

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (31 December 1879), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43096664

[Advertisement], The Brisbane Courier (4 April 1881), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article913591

"ENTERTAINMENT AT KOGARAH", The Sydney Morning Herald (25 August 1894), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13965505

"A SYDNEY MUSICIAN", The Inquirer & Commercial News (6 November 1896), 14

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66536419

Amateurs of music will regret to hear that Miss Dora Ohlfsen-Baggé, the young pianist who left this city to study at Berlin, has been obliged to give up work for a time in order to recruit her health (says a Sydney contemporary). Miss Ohlfsen-Baggé studied at Berlin under Herr Moskowski and Fraulein Emma Koch until last autumn, when she broke down, and went to visit friends at Aromenbaun, on the Gulf of Finland. The young artist has now settled for a time at St. Petersburg, where she has met Glazounow, a new Russian composer, "tall, solemn, pale, who does not walk but moves," supposed to be the successor of Tschaikowsky.

"Local and General", The Campbelltown Herald (26 June 1901), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article102168675


Bibliography and resources:

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/t/a/l/Geert-Talst/WEBSITE-0001/UHP-0021.html

"Dora Ohlfsen-Bagge", Design & art Australia online (DAAO)

http://www.daao.org.au/bio/dora-ohlfsen-bagge

Elizabeth Ashburn, "Ohlfsen, Dora", in Robert Aldrich and Garry Wotherspoon (eds.), Who's who in gay and lesbian history from antiquity to World War II (London: Routledge, 2001), 333

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=giM73n_lca4C&pg=PA333 (PREVIEW)





O'KEEFE, Constantine (Constantine O'KEEFE; Mr. C. O'KEEFE)

Violinist, music teacher

Active Goulburn, NSW, c. 1883-1903

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Constantine+O'Keefe (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O'KEEFE-Constantine (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"Our Boys Amateur Dramatic Club", Goulburn Evening Penny Post (8 September 1887), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article98474190

. . . The most notable feature in the entertainment was the performance of Mr. C. O'Keefe's string band of eight performers, who made their first appearance on this occasion. They rendered several selections in a style which shows that the band numbers amongst its members some able instrumentalists, and their contribution to the evening's entertainment was highly appreciated. The members of the band are - Mr. C. O'Keefe, first violin; Messrs. B. Donnelly, Passmore, and J. Lynch, second violins; Mr. A. Badcock, flute; Mr. J. Slatyer, cornet; Mr. Percy Hollis, piano; Mr. J. M. Glynn, double bass . . .

"Academy Orchestra", Goulburn Evening Penny Post (12 October 1889), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article98488512

A meeting of O'Keefe's string band was held at the Academy of Music last evening, when it was resolved to reorganise the band and place the society on a permanent basis. Mr. C. O'Keefe was unanimously elected leader and treasurer and Mr. W. G. Rendall secretary. The band, which will in future be known as the "Academy Orchestra," will resume practice on Tuesday evening next and every subsequent Monday, and we are assured that no paine wilt be spared by its members to make it a musical society deserving of the best patronage and support of the public.

"PRESENTATIONS. Mr. C. O'KEEFE, music teacher . . .", Goulburn Evening Penny Post (11 February 1896), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article98568184

MR. O. O'KEEFE, music teacher, had a pleasant surprise on Saturday afternoon, when the children composing the orchestra which played at the recent annual concert of the Highland Society and Burns Club met at his residence and presented him with an address and a handsome amethyst scarf-pin. The address, which had been neatly illuminated by Mr. Townley, was most appropriately headed with a couple of bars of "Fiddle and I." The frame, supplied by Mr. Railton, was novel and pleasing. The wording of the document was as follows:

Goulburn, 8th February, 1896.
Dear Mr. O'Keele, - We, the undersigned members of your juvenile orchestra, desire to convey to you our thankfulness for the untiring interest you showed us during our study for the recent Scotch concert. We beg of you to accept the accompanying small gift, trusting you may long be spared to instruct us in the art of music.
Yours sincerely, Linda Hewitt, Constance March, Mina Hewitt, Lelia Denneen, Ada Fortescue, S. McDonell, John Ingelton, Willie Topham, R. baxter, Albert R. Ball, J. Taylor.

The address was read by Miss Linda Hewitt and presented by Miss Constance March. Mr. O'Keefe was very grateful for this thoughtful recognition by his pupils, and the present was all the more pleasing inasmuch as he had not heard the slightest whisper of it. Those who were at the concert will remember that the juveniles acquitted themselves excellently. The Highland Society have recognised Mr. O'Keefe's services by making him an honorary member for the current year.





OLDHAM, Mary (Mary OLDHAM; Mrs. Joseph HARBOTTLE)

Amateur composer, pianist, vocalist

Born Hobart Town, VDL (TAS), 8 October 1842; daughter of Peter OLDHAM (d. 1894) and Margaret KING (d. 1855)
Married Joseph HARBOTTLE, St. David's church, Hobart, TAS, 7 November 1865
Died Lindisfarne, TAS, 4 June 1923, aged 80

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Mary+Oldham+Harbottle+1842-1923 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OLDHAM-Mary (shareable link to this entry)


Summary:

Mary Oldham's father, Peter Oldham, was a leading member of the Tasmanian Yacht Club.

See, for instance, "WHALING, SHIPBUILDING, AND DEEPSEA FISHING", The Mercury (10 November 1865), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8835940 

. . . we have one vessel fitted out by a gentleman of our city, celebrated for his enterprise in all things nautical. Mr. Peter Oldham is the owner of a vessel of 33 tons register, formerly his yacht, during the existence of the Tasmanian Yacht Club . . .


Documentation:

"COLONIAL MUSIC", The Mercury (26 June 1862), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8808068

We have been favoured with a copy of "The Tasmanian Yacht Club Polka," composed and respectfully dedicated to the members of the Club by Miss Mary Oldham. It is published by J. Walch and Sons, and printed by J. Alvares and Co., of Hobart Town, in the style of the most finished perfection, quite equal, indeed, to any similar work published in mother country.

"THE TASMANIAN YACHT CLUB POLKA", Launceston Examiner (26 June 1862), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article41454125

This is the name of a very pretty polka just published at Hobart Town, and now on sale at the establishments of Messrs. Walch and Sons. It is composed by Miss Mary Oldham, and dedicated by her to the members of the club. The music is lively and spirited, and the piece will doubtless become a great favorite. The lithographers, Messrs. J. Alvarez and Co., are entitled to notice, for the creditable manner in which they have printed it.

Marriages in the district of Hobart, 1865; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:868070; RGD37/1/24 no 126

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/868070 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD37-1-24$init=RGD37-1-24p75 

"MARRIAGES", The Mercury (23 November 1865), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8836186

HARBOTTLE - OLDHAM. - On 7th November, at St. David's Cathedral, by the Ven. Archdeacon Davies, Joseph, third son of the late Mr. Thomas Harbottle, to Mary, eldest daughter of Mr. Peter Oldham, Cornelian Bay.

"CONCERT", The Mercury (3 May 1870), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8868007

. . . The duet from Maritana, sung by Miss Sherwin and Mrs. Harbottle, deserved the encore it received . . .

"CONCERT IN THE TOWN HALL", The Mercury (6 July 1881), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8998609

. . . Mrs. Harbottle and Mr. Seddon were the principal accompanyists, and they performed their duties to the satisfaction both of singers and auditors.

"DEATHS", The Mercury (5 June 1923), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article23662037 

HARBOTTLE - On June 4, 1923 at Lindisfarne, Mary, widow of the late Joseph Harbottle, in the 81st year of her age.


Musical works:

The Tasmanian Yacht Club polka respectfully dedicated to the members of the club by Miss Mary Oldham (Hobart Town: J. Walch & Sons, n.d. [1862])

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/9854765 (DIGITISED)




OLDHAM, William (William OLDHAM)

Amateur musician, vocalist, bandmaster, conductor, ? composer

Born Dublin, Ireland, 9 February 1811
Married Sarah Elizabeth CARMICHAEL (1812-1901), Dublin, by c. 1835
Arrived South Australia, 15 April 1838 (per Lord Goderich from London, via Gravesend, 15 October 1837)
Died Kapunda, SA, 3 July 1885, aged 75

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=William+Oldham+1811-1885 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OLDHAM-William (shareable link to this entry)

OLDHAM, William Carmichael (William Carmichael OLDHAM; Mr. W. C. OLDHAM)

Amateur (and briefly professional) musician, composer, piano tuner

Born Dublin, Ireland, c. 1836; son of William OLDHAM and Sarah Elizabeth CARMICHAEL
Arrived South Australia, 15 April 1838 (per Lord Goderich, from London, via Gravesend, 15 October 1837)
Married Marion Cowan TOD (1840-1875), Adelaide, SA, 8 July 1858
Died Melbourne, VIC, 21 May 1875, aged 39 years

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=William+Carmichael+Oldham+d1875 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OLDHAM-William-C (shareable link to this entry)

OLDHAM, Ernest William (Ernest William OLDHAM)

Amateur musician, composer

Born Allendale North, via Kapunda, SA, 15 July 1862, son of William Carmichael OLDHAM and Marion TOD
Died North Adelaide, SA, 17 December 1890

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OLDHAM-Ernest (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"NEW MUSIC", South Australian Register (12 January 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50020159

We have been favoured with a copy of a new schottische, composed by Mr. W. C. Oldham, and called the Kapunda Rifle Volunteers' Schottische. It is a lively and inspiriting piece of music, and will no doubt find great favour in our assemblies. We trust, for the credit of the colony, that it may not turn out to be a recollection of some long-forgotten melody; and in saying this, the composer will be fully aware that we intend no insinuation against his honour. The schottische is capitally lithographed by Penman & Galbraith, of Adelaide.

"SOUTH AUSTRALIAN VOLUNTEER MILITRAY TASK FORCE. APPOINTMENTS", Adelaide Observer (26 October 1861), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article158183618 

KAPUNDA MINE RIFLES. - William Oldham, Esq., to be Captain; and Thomas F. Oldham and William Carmichael Oldham, gentlemen, to be Lieutenants.

"COLONIAL MUSIC", South Australian Register (26 December 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50082179

A collection of the musical pieces composed and published in the colony would form quite a volume. We remember to have seen the productions of Mrs. A. J. Murray, Signor Cutolo, Herr Linger, Miska Hauser, Mrs. H. F. Price, Messrs. Draeger, O. F. V. Reyher, E. K. Daniel, W. C. Oldham, H. Pounsett, and J. Elliott . . .

"KAPUNDA [From our own Correspondent] August 7", The South Australian Advertiser (8 August 1863), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31826660 

The eighth anniversary of Court Rose of the Forest was held on Thursday last, and the day being a general holiday in honour of Prince Alfred a great number of people assembled to witness the proceedings . . . On the removal of the cloth the Kapunda Mine Rifles Band played the Overture from "Tancredi" in a very superior style . . .

"NEW MUSIC", South Australian Register (10 February 1871), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39255348

We have to acknowledge the receipt of the "Marion Waltz," composed by Mr. W. C. Oldham, of Kapunda, and very neatly lithographed. The artist has not attached his name, but we suppose the monogram at the foot of the title page (J. B. conjoined) indicates it. At any rate he deserves credit for the great care he has evidently bestowed upon his work. The melody of the music is simple, yet spirited and pleasing. The composer has also shown considerable skill as a contrapuntist. The introduction is in D major, and the after strains modulate successively into G, C, and F. A few bars towards the end very cleverly bring back the music to the original key. The "Marion Waltz" is lithographed for private circulation only, but it is a valuable addition to our "native industries" nevertheless.

[2 advertisements], South Australian Register (17 February 1871), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39245922

THE MARION WALTZ, by W. C. Oldham, on Sale at Marshall's, Woodman's, and Platts's.

W. C. OLDHAM, PIANOFORTE TUNER. Address Gover-street, North Adelaide, or Platts's.

"KAPUNDA", South Australian Register (22 August 1873), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39300149

Notwithstanding inclement weather the local Philharmonic Society held their third concert on Friday. Early in the evening, owing to steady rain, it wan thought that it would be necessary to postpone the entertainment; but the front seats and some at the back were well filled. The conductor was Mr. W. Oldham . . . The concert was ended by the first part of Haydn's oratorio, "The Seasons," being presented by the whole company. The Society must be congratulated upon the way that the members rendered this difficult production.

"DEATH", Kapunda Herald and Northern Intelligencer (28 May 1875), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108368854 

OLDHAM. - On the 21st inst., at Melbourne, on his way returning from the Northern Territory, William Carmichael, eldest son of William Oldham, of Kapunda, aged 39 years.

"MR. W. C. OLDHAM", Kapunda Herald and Northern Intelligencer (28 May 1875), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108368851 

Our obituary contains a notification of the death at Melbourne of our former townsman Mr. W. C. Oldham. Mr. W. G. Oldham had been some time at the Northern Territory, but his constitution would not stand the trying climate of that place, and when he left it in the Claud Hamilton he was almost in a dying state. Mr. Goodchild and others paid him every attention on the passage, but when he reached Melbourne it was evident that he could not stand the passage to Adelaide. He accordingly remained at Melbourne, where death put an end to his sufferings on Saturday last. Great sympathy is felt for the family in the bereavement they have sustained.

"DEATHS", Kapunda Herald and Northern Intelligencer (24 September 1875), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article108369510 

OLDHAM. - At Angaston, on the 18th inst., Mrs. W. C. Oldham, of consumption, aged 36 years.

"NEW MUSIC", Kapunda Herald (19 September 1882), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article106569990 

We have received from Mr. Ernest W. Oldham, of Adelaide, son of our former townsman, the late Mr. W. C. Oldham, copy of a new piece of dance music "Ma premiere Polka," composed by him, which has just been neatly lithographed by Messrs. Penman & Galbraith. On a first trial it went well, and we think bids fair to become a general favorite, the tune being well marked, and the air pretty, whilst, the harmonies are also pleasing. It will be remembered that Mr. W. C. Oldham published several dance compositions of his own that became very popular - "The Kapunda Rifle Schottische," "Marion Polka," &c., and it seems as though the gift is hereditary. The piece under notice is, we note, published at the moderate price of 2s.

"DEATH OF MR. W. OLDHAM, OF KAPUNDA", South Australian Register (4 July 1885), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article44945846

It is with regret that we record the death of Mr. W. Oldham, an old and respected resident of Kapunda, which took place at his residence about 1 o'clock on Friday morning. For some time past he had been in failing health, and for a month before his death had been laid aside from work suffering from a painful disorder, which gradually exhausted his strength and brought about his death. It would be difficult to find many in the colony who have had such a long, useful, and varied career, and still fewer have held a more extensive influence in a country town than many years ago Mr. Oldham enjoyed in Kapunda. He might, indeed, be called the founder of Kapunda, seeing that he was intimately connected with the origin of so many of its useful institutions. While he occupied the post of Manager of the famous mine he was also the pioneer Postmaster, Bank Manager, Congregational minister, and captain of the large and efficient company of volunteers known as the Mine Rifles, his two sons being officers under him. When the volunteers were re-enrolled under Major General Downes he was appointed Major, and when, on account of old age, he was compelled to resign, the Governor allowed him, on account of his long service, to retain the rank and to wear the uniform. Living to the ripe age of 75, and retaining to the full the capacities of an active and ingenious mind, it was to him an acute trial to see the influence and power for usefulness which in the prime of life he wielded gradually withdrawn from him. Nevertheless, it was to himself, to his family, and to the many friends who loved and honoured him a great satisfaction that he succeeded in accomplishing so much.

Mr. Oldham was born in Dublin on February 9, 1811, and the first twenty-six years of his life were spent in the Emerald Isle, where he married Miss Eliza Carmichael, who now survives him. In 1837 he left England in the Lord Godrich, and arrived in Adelaide in 1838. For some years he was Protector of the Aborigines, and in that capacity was instrumental in compiling a grammar of the Adelaide blackfellows' language. He subsequently opened a school in Light-square, next in Gawler, and afterwards in Angaston. About 1847 he was appointed purser to the Kapunda Mine, which had been opened a year or two before, and afterwards, on the retirement of Captain Bagot, succeeded to the Managership. He was for twenty years actively engaged in this work, during the flourishing days of the copper industry. In 1867 the mine changed hands, and the new process of "precipitating" the copper came into vogue in lieu of smelting. This revolution eventuated in his resigning, and Captain Osborn, who had come out from England for the purpose of inaugurating the new process, took his place. While managing the Kapunda Mine he was highly esteemed as a settler of disputes amongst the people, and for years afterwards it was a common practice for workers in the mine to appeal to him as an arbitrator when differences arose.

Mr. Oldham, with his extraordinary capacity for adapting himself to adverse circumstances, afterwards studied for and passed what examination was necessary for qualifying himself as a certificated architect and surveyor, and established a connection in the town in that capacity. A little later, in 1869, he was appointed Clerk to the District Council; and continued to work in this sphere of life until his decease. In religious matters he was an earnest worker, and during the greater part of his life was engaged in preaching the gospel. About the year 1858, when the necessities of the town seemed to demand it, he studied and became ordained as Congregational minister. For two years he was pastor of the newly formed Church, and in 1861 was succeeded by the Rev. Morgan Williams. In later years he continued to manifest his interest in the cause, and was for years a deacon of the Church.

He was, moreover, an earnest lover of music, and his practical mind soon caused his love for the art to show itself in useful work. He trained the band of the Mine Rifles, which earned for itself a reputation which has deservedly outlived it; also as conductor of the Philharmonic Society he was for years engaged in raising the standard of music in the town.

As a Magistrate for several years, and more recently a Freemason, his name has also been distinguished, and his character, if only for its ingenious versatility and wealth of resource, must be looked upon as worthy of admiration. His surviving sons are Mr. F. B. Oldham, Kapunda, and Mr. C. C. Oldham, National Bank Manager, Willunga; the daughters are Mrs. H. E. A. O'Sullivan, Orroroo, Mrs. E. Salter, Angaston, and Mrs. W. G. Goodchild, Kapunda.


Musical works:

The Kapunda Rifle Volunteers' schottische [W. C. Oldham] ([Adelaide: Penman and Galbraith, 1861])

NO COPY OF ORIGINAL EDITION IDENTIFIED

The Kapunda Rifle schottische by W. C. Oldham (Adelaide: Sims and Elliott, [c. 1867-69])

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/44349872 

The Kapunda Rifle schottische by W. C. Oldham, Kapunda (Adelaide: S. Marshall & Son., [c. 1870s])

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/7428043 

Kapunda Rifles schottische, Davison [sic] in Popular dance music arranged for the pianoforte by H. F. Wallace (Melbourne: [Author], [ ])

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/44438695 

http://handle.slv.vic.gov.au/10381/151846 (DIGITISED)

The Marion waltz ("composed by Mr. W. C. Oldham, of Kapunda") ([Adelaide: For private circulation, 1871])

NO COPY IDENTIFIED

Ma premiere polka ("by Mr. Ernest W. Oldham") (Adelaide: Penman and Galbraith, [1882])

NO COPY IDENTIFIED


Bibliography and resources:

Oldham family papers; State Library of South Australia

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/217098451 





OLIFFE, Harriet (Mrs. OLIFFE)

Actor, vocalist

= Harriet JONES





OLIVER, Mr. (Mr. OLIVER)

Music teacher

Active Melbourne, VIC, 1869

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OLIVER (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Argus (12 July 1869), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5821030

MISS E. SMITH wishes to communicate with Mr. Oliver, music teacher.





OLROH, Gurger (sic, ? spell.)

? Barrel organ player

Active Melbourne, VIC, 1855

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OLROH (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Argus (7 August 1855), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4814437 

TWO Weeks' Notice is hereby given to Mr. Gurger Olroh, that, after the 20th of this month, his Organ will be sold to defray the expenses and repairs it has cost, and for storage. Apply by letter, to Mr. Baike, at Mr. Lafargue's, 121 La Trobe-street east, Melbourne.





ONIONS, John (John ONIONS; ONION)

Convict, singing and music master

See main page John Onions





ONN, Constantia (Mary Theresa O'FLYNN; Constantia Mary; Mrs. John Withno ONN; Mrs. ONN; Constantia ONN; Madame ONN)

Mezzo-soprano vocalist, pianist, ballad singer, songwriter, composer

Born c. 1831; daughter of Michael O'FLYNN
Married John Withno ONN (1820-1906), Dublin, Ireland, 17 November 1849
Arrived Melbourne, VIC, 14 February 1854 (per Golden Age, from Liverpool, 5 December 1853)
Died Geelong, VIC, 21 December 1876, aged 45

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Constantia+Onn+d1876 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#ONN-Constantia (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Argus (18 September 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4797768 

ASTLEY'S AMPHITHEATRE, Spring-street. Sole Lessee, Mr. George Lewis . . .
GRAND MUSICAL AND COMIC ENTERTAINMENT.
2. - Song, Mrs. Onn . . .
8. - Concerto Medley, Irish Airs upon the Pianoforte, with Irish Ballad, Mrs. Onn . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (12 October 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4798863 

MRS. J. W. ONN'S Musical Academy, opened at 117 Spring-street, exactly opposite the National Schools.

[Advertisement], The Argus (30 March 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4806073 

LADY HOTHAM'S POLKA, Composed by Mrs. Onn. To be had at all the principal Music shops.

"BALLARAT", The Argus (20 August 1855), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4815743

. . . Every description of amusement is to be found here. The eminent violinist, Miska Hauser, left some days ago, having taken a farewell complimentary benefit at the Star, on which occasion he was greeted by a crowded house. Miss L. Swannell, Madame Onn, and a powerful company of gentlemen vocalists, continue to draw good houses at the Star Concert Hall . . .

"MECHANICS' INSTITUTE SOIREE", The Star (27 April 1857), 2s

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66041937

A social reunion of the committee, members, and friends of the Mechanics' Institute took place on Friday evening at the Council Chambers, Sturt-street . . . Tea being over and the tables spread with fruit , Madame Onn, who had kindly consented, as also Messrs D. Oliver, Stoddart, Pope, and one other member of the Ballarat Harmonic Society, to enliven the evening with singing, went on the platform and gave a song, accompanying herself on the piano . . . Madame Onn then sang a very beautiful melody . . .

[Advertisement], The Star (3 October 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66044533

STAR CONCERT HALL.
ENGAGEMENT of the celebrated Misses Creed Royal, Who will sing some, of their much admired Duets.
Mr Cassidy, The Australian Sam Cowell, in new characteristic Comic Songs.
Madam Onn, The admired Mezzo Soprano.
Mr. McDonald, The well known Scotch Vocalist.
To-night, Saturday, Billy Barlow will communicate the result of the great intercolonial matches between "ALICE HAWTHORN" and "VENO," &c., &c.
Pianists: Creed Royal and Mons. Palin.
WILLIAM IRWIN.
Saturday, 3rd October.

[Advertisement], The Argus (25 August 1868), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5825245

. . . AUSTRALIAN TUSSAUD'S Now contains ABOVE 200 FIGURES, Many of which can safely Challenge comparison. MADAME ONN'S MATINEES and SOIREES MUSICALE, Singing, Piano, Orchestra. Open from 10 a.m. till 10 p.m. . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (18 September 1868), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5827456

. . . AUSTRALIAN TUSSAUD'S . . . Madame Onn's new songs - "Come home, father" . . .

{Advertisement], Geelong Advertiser (4 November 1872), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article150400140 

MADAME CONSTANTIA ONN, Pupil of the celebrated Masters Henri Herz, Thalberg, Signor Sapio, and Haydn Corri (organist), gives LESSONS ON THE PIANOFORTE, SINGING, AND HARMONIUM, And the Theory of Music, At her Residence, 7 Virginia Street, Opposite Trinity Church.

[News], The Argus (24 November 1873), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5876113

We have received the following pieces of new music for review: - "The Victorian Volunteer Waltz," third edition, by Mrs. T. W. L. Martyr; "The Sunbeam," galop, by Alfred Anderson, R.A.M.; "The Grecian Polka," by Madame Onn. These compositions are of the average order of merit in the style to which each belongs . . .

[News], The Argus (23 December 1876), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5912811

Madame Onn, a music teacher, well known in Geelong, died very suddenly on Thursday evening. When playing the piano in a room with some friends about 6 o'clock she felt ill, and was endeavouring to leave when she fell, and in so doing came into contact with some flower pots and received a slight injury on the temple. Dr. Day was in attendance shortly afterwards, but was unable to relieve the lady's sufferings. She expired at midnight, a paralytic stroke being the cause.

"VICTORIA", The Mercury (2 January 1877), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8950240

Madame Onn, a well-known teacher of music, met with a very sudden death on Thursday night at her residence, in Geelong. She was playing the piano in apparently good health, when a kind of paralysis suddenly seized her, and on rising she fell down, and expired before medical aid could be obtained.

"Baandee. DEATH OF A WELL-KNOWN FARMER", Merredin Mercury and Central Districts Index [Merredin, WA] (16 October 1919), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article156008865 

On October the 4th, death took somewhat suddenly from our little community another of our earliest and best known settlers in the person of John Withno Onn, of Inglenook farm . . . At the time of his death he was 65 years of age, having been born in Dublin in 1854. At the early age of 2 years he was brought to Australia by his parents . . .


Musical works:

Lady Hotham's polka ([Melbourne, 1855])

NO COPY IDENTIFIED

The Grecian polka ([Melbourne, 1873])

NO COPY IDENTIFIED





ORAM, Robert (Robert ORAM; Mr. ORAM)

Amateur musician, flautist, flute player, publican

Active Sydney, NSW, by 1834
Died Sydney, NSW, 29 August 1850

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Robert+Oram+d1850 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#ORAM-Robert (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"A HINT TO THE MAITLAND POLICE", Bell's Life in Sydney (16 January 1847), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59765468

It may be in the recollection of our readers that a watch was lately stolen from the public-house of Mr. Oram, known as the Settler's Arms, Castlereagh-street, on the night of the 20th ult. by a lodger, whose name and occupation were not specified in the paragraph alluded to. At the request of the owner of the watch, and for the information of the Maitland Police, we beg to subjoin a detailed report of the occurrence. On Monday the 28th December, a man of gentlemanly exterior and address, named Fullard, a piano-forte tuner by profession, and a resident of Maitland, put up at the "Settler's Arms." He paid for all he had the first night, and requested to be shown a bed-room. In this he was accommodated, and there he slept, the landlord nothing doubting his ability or inclination to pay for all he so magnificently ordered. He remained there on the following day and night, "issuing his sublime commands," much in the air of a German Prince, and being served accordingly. On the following day he offered Mr. Oram, who is an expert musician, a flute, an elegant one of ebony, mounted with silver, and keys of the same metal, for sale, deficient only in the loss of the penultimate joint: this he said he had left with a musical-instrument maker, to have the key adjusted. Mr. Oram consented to be the purchaser, provided he supplied the missing joint, without which the instrument was, of course, perfectly useless. Having gone out for that purpose, he never returned; and it is supposed that he has found his way back to Maitland, where we hope the conservatives of the peace will have a sharp look out for him. He has a "pearl" in his eye - one of great price no doubt, and cannot easily escape detection, if he is the real thief. - However, the watch, which hung upon the mantle piece, disappeared with the ---- C operator, Mr. Fullard, and the owner is particularly anxious to know the "time o'day" by his own time-keeper - verbum sat.

"INQUESTS", The Sydney Morning Herald (4 September 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12920781 

On Friday last, an inquest was held at Driver's, the Three Tuns Tavern, King-street, on view of the body of Robert Oram. It appeared that the deceased had been of generally intemperate habits, but had during the last week or two more than ordinarily indulged, his usual drinks being rum and colonial ale. Mr. Cartwright, surgeon, deposed, that deceased was evidently dying when he was called in, and died in about half an hour afterwards; from his experience of four or five years' practice in Sydney, he was of opinion that drinking colonial ale to excess had a much more pernicious effect on the system than the use of spirituous liquors; it seemed to have a powerful narcotic effect. Verdict, Died from exhaustion induced by previous excessive intemperance.





ORCHARD, William Arundel (W. Arundel ORCHARD)

Musician, violinist, educator, conductor, composer, writer

Born London, 13 April 1867
Arrived Albany, WA, 31 August 1895 (on the Ormuz, from England)
Died at sea, 7 April 1961 (on the Dominion Monarch, returning from Europe)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.party-523416 (NLA persistent identifier)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#ORCHARD-William-Arundel (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"SHIPPING", The Inquirer and Commercial News (6 September 1895), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article72378989

"NEWS AND NOTES", The West Australian (9 September 1895), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4543787

MR. W. ARUNDEL ORCHARD, Bachelor of Music, Associate of the Royal College of Organists, has just recently arrived from England, and intends settling in Perth as a teacher of music. He has had a large teaching experience, and has been conductor of several London orchestral and choral societies. Mr. Orchard also holds authority from Trinity College, London, to form a local centre for both theoretical and practical examinations in music. These centres are very popular in the Eastern colonies. It may be added that Sir William Robinson has recently been appointed a vice-president of Trinity College.

"MUSICAL CULTURE IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA" [editorial], The Daily News (11 October 1895), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article81386670

"MUSICAL", The Mercury (8 February 1897), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9391130

Mr. Arundel Orchard, Mus. Bac. (England), who has been appointed to St. David's Cathedral, is said to possess the musical tastes and talents which will be approbated in Hobart. He has a reputation as a conductor of no mean standard in choral und orchestral work, and his powers in this direction have been turned to good account in West Australia, where Sir Gerard Smith has taken great interest in the work of his societies. Mr. Orchard takes up his duties at St. David's on March 1, and will doubtless upon his arrival make preparations for orchestral and choral work during the winter months.

"PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY'S CONCERT", The Mercury (10 May 1899), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article9447732

. . . Next came "The wreck of the Hesperus," a ballad for chorus and orchestra, composed by the conductor and dedicated to the society. This is undoubtedly a scholarly work, containing many passages of original, pleasing, and even sparkling music. In many respects the composition is Wagnerian in style and spirit to a considerable extent. This is especially noticeable in the colouring, dramatic intensity, and sonorous effects produced. Certainly the beautiful poem of Longfellow's lends itself very favourably to such a style of writing. It was stated on the programme that in setting the words to music the composer had endeavoured to keep well in view three dominant features of the poem (1) the wild and terrible night at sea; (2) the brave, unheeding, yet loving father; and (3) the gentle, but terror-stricken daughter; and that with such a continuous narrative it was deemed expedient to avoid making any distinct conclusion in the music until the end, and thereby secure a closer alliance to the words.

Undoubtedly Mr. Orchard's severest critics will warmly commend the idea. The first part of the composition is picturesquely written. As the narrative proceeds to the incidents of the girl's forebodings and distress the music is weird, and is occasionally somewhat lacking in apt expression; but when the description of the wreck is reached there is some splendid dramatic writing in the composition, and which last evening seemed to not only move the chorus, but also the audience, and will no doubt be most highly praised by all competent to judge. The chorus gave a spirited rendering of the ballad throughout, as though feeling proud of their conductor's work. The orchestra did very well. There were a few slips, but their breadth of tone and execution was highly creditable. At the conclusion of the performance the audience applauded with much enthusiasm, Mr. Orchard, as conductor and composer, being twice recalled, and a handsome bouquet of flowers was sent up to him.

"MUSIC IN THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES", Musical News [UK] 18 (1900), 517; reprinted: "MUSIC IN THE AUSTRALIAN COLONIES (Musical News)", The Mercury (4 August 1900), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12806348 

Musical progress in the colonies has quickened considerably during the last few years. Until recently the commercial atmosphere has been so pronounced that art has had a poor time of it. For a considerable time the majority of people that went to the Colonies remained with the one idea of money making and spending their leisure in the pursuit of outdoor pleasures which the climate in that part of the world renders so alluring. In a lesser degree the same condition exists with the people now, but there has been time for many to regard the Colonies as their home. Consequently the desire for art, where it existed, has taken the outward form of an effort to cultivate and develop a closer and deeper acquaintance with the better forms of the particular art most congenial.

Probably he first serious attempt on a large scale to put music in a recognised position was the engagement in the year 1888 by the authorities of the Melbourne Exhibition, of Mr. F. H. Cowen as Musical director. It is probably known that Mr. Cowen took with him from London several instrumentalists, the remainder of his orchestra being made up of players resident in the Colonies. All told the orchestra numbered 73, including five extra string players. The chorus numbered 709. The success of this venture is a matter of history. Concerts of a high order were frequently given and the total number of orchestral and choral works was 265. There is no doubt that the 10 months' engagement of Mr. Cowen and his forces gave a great impetus to the music of the Colonies. His public became acquainted with the best works, given in a manner reflecting the highest credit on all concerned. An extract from the official record of the Continental [recte Centennial] International Exhibition will be of interest: "It was anticipated that not only would these conceits be a source of pleasure to those visiting the exhibition, but that the stimulation of a love of good music for its own sake and the consequent elevation of the public taste would amply repay the expenditure that would necessarily be incurred.

At the present time time very good orchestral concerts may be heard in Melbourne. Especially good is Mr. Marshall-Hall's orchestra, which gives really finished performances. The Philharmonic Society, with its large chorus and orchestra, has an excellent repertoire, to which it is constantly adding.

Sydney, with its Liedertafel and orchestral societies, is not behind Melbourne in musical progress. Indeed, it would be difficult to say which of these two cities is making the most satisfactory headway. In both can be found many excellent professors of the various departments of the art, some of them doing most useful work. Both Melbourne and Adelaide Universities are fortunate in having a Chair of Music. In New Zealand the four affiliated colleges of the University teach and examine in music, but there is no Chair, nearly all the examination papers being sent home to examiners specially appointed.

When the University of Queensland is established - a bill for that purpose having already come before its Government - it will have powers to grant degrees in music as in Tasmania, where the Council of the University has already before it the question of granting musical degrees by examination. It is healthy to see musical activity existing in the educational centre of each colony, and much good must be the result in the not far distant future.

In 1895 an exhibition was held at Hobart, Tasmania, and an interesting feature was the engagement of an orchestra consisting of Tasmanians and those resident in the other colonies, under the direction of Mr. Otto Linden.

The concert tours made by many great artists from England are an important factor in the musical education of the colony. It will be remembered that Sir Charles and Lady Halle, Mr. Santley, Madame Albani, Ovide Musin and others received most enthusiastic receptions throughout their tours. The colonies are ever ready to give a cordial welcome where it is merited.

Ecclesiastical music is not as advanced as it might be. With a few notable exceptions, mainly cathedrals, musical services are at a low ebb. It is difficult to keep a choir together for any length of time, and often it is a question of local limitations mainly owing to the great isolation of many churches from the larger centres.

The examinations of the Associated Board and Trinity College London, have found a good field in this quarter of the globe. The number of entries for the Practice and Theory of Music is increasing greatly each year. The returns of the examinations would be interesting as evidence of the importance now being given to music in the general education of young colonials. Even the higher examinations are now in request.

Another interesting feature is the continued success of intercolonial band contests which take place annually and are the direct cause of much progress in this important department of music. The competition is frequently very keen, and the selected pieces invariably demand performances of no mean order.

Nothing has been said of West Australia, for the reason that it is early to give this colony a place in musical history. Perth has had and still has, some societies doing their best for the art, but hitherto the material has been of too migratory a nature and not sufficiently strong to maintain anything satisfactory. West Australia has a future and it is to be hoped that music will got its fair share of attention.

- W. Arundel Orchard.


Bibliography and resources:

NLA, MS 5782, Paper of Dr. William Arundel Orchard

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/11551993

www.nla.gov.au/ms/findaids/5782.html 

John Carmody, "Orchard, William Arundel (1867-1961)", Australian dictionary of biography 11 (1988)

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/orchard-william-arundel-7913 


ASSOCIATIONS: William Robinson




OSBORNE, Isabel Martha (Isabel THROSBY; Mrs. Alick OSBORNE)

Amateur pianist, vocalist, sheet music collector

Born Throsby Park, NSW, 1 January 1844 [sic]; 5th daughter of Charles THROSBY; younger sister of Mary THROSBY
Married Alick OSBORNE, Christ Church, Bong Bong, 5 September 1861
Died Hamilton, Moss Vale, NSW, 13 June 1901, aged 47 years

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Isabel+Throsby+Osborne+1844-1901 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OSBORNE-Isabel (shareable link to this entry)

OSBORNE, Laura Mary (Laura Mary OSBORNE; Mrs. Francis FOSBERRY)

Born Berrima, NSW, 1873; daughter of the above
Married Francis FOSBERRY, Moss Vale, NSW, 1897


Documentation:

"BIRTHS", The Sydney Morning Herald (4 January 1844), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article124118991 

"MARRIAGES", The Sydney Morning Herald (10 September 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13056204 

"DEATHS", The Daily Telegraph (22 June 1901), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article237263171 


Musical sources:

Isabel Throsby songbook; bound collection of early nineteenth century vocal music formerly belonging to Isabel Martha Throsby; Sydney Living Museums (digitised at Internet Archive)

https://archive.org/details/ThrosbySongbook41793 

See also a similar album from the Throsby-Osborne collection that previously belonged to Isabel's governess Elizabeth Gittins:

https://archive.org/details/Gittins46256 (DIGITISED)




OSBORNE, Ferdinand William (? Frederick William OSBORNE; Ferdinand OSBORNE; F. W. OSBORNE; W. F. OSBORNE; ? William OSBORNE)

Professor of music, violinist (pupil of Baillot and Toulbecque, Paris Conservatoire), orchestra leader, publican

Active Adelaide, SA, by May 1850
Active Melbourne, VIC, by April 1852
Active Beechworth, VIC, by 1857
Died Urana, NSW, 23 November 1898

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Ferdinand+Osborne+d1898 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OSBORNE-Ferdinand-W (shareable link to this entry)


Summary:

Osborne claimed later in life to have been a pupil of Pierre Baillot (1771-1842), and also of "Toulbecque" [sic], of the Paris Conservatoire, presumably August-Joseph Tolbecque (1801-1869). He also claimed to have played in England for Alfred Mellon (1820-1867), if so, presumably in the late 1840s, relatively early in Mellon's career.

Osborne first appeared in a public concert in May 1850, and was leader of the Adelaide Choral Society for its July concert. He made his "first appearance" in Melbourne playing a violin solo at a Thursday Concert in April 1852, part of a recent musical migration from Adelaide that also included Richard Bancroft, August Huenerbein, and Charles Mater.


Documentation:

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (22 May 1850), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207116153 

GRAND CONCERT . . . MR. S. W. WALLACE has the honour to inform the residents of Adelaide and its vicinity that he intends giving a Grand Concert, on the evening of Wednesday, (this day), for which many novelties are in preparation. He will be assisted by Mrs. Murray, Messrs. Ellard, Gale, Tilly, Fischer, Slater, Hunerbein, Chapman, Keidel, Osborne, Lee, Frederick Coppin, &c., &c.

"LOCAL INTELLIGENCE", South Australian Register (23 May 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38442088 

We were unwillingly compelled to omit the following notice of the conversazione at the Pulteney-street School in yesterday's paper . . . Mr. Osborne, on the violin, and Mrs. Murray, on the piano, played a duet, introducing airs from Massaniello; their performance was much admired . . .

[Advertisement], Adelaide Times (19 July 1850), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207117472 

EXCHANGE, KING WILLIAM-STREET . . . MONSTER CONCERT . . . IN AID OF THE FUNDS OF THE GERMAN AND BRITISH HOSPITAL.
Mrs. Murray, Madame Cranz, Miss Lazar, Miss Coglin, Mrs. Jupp, Mr. Ellard, Mr. Gale, Herr Fischer.
THE ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY.
Leader - Mr. Osborn.
THE DEUTSCHE LIEDERTAFEL.
Director - Herr Cranz.
INSTRUMENTAL.
Conductor - Mr. Wallace.
Principal 1st Violins - Messrs. Wallace, Osborn, Lee, and F. Coppin . . .
On Friday Evening, 19th of July, 1850 . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian (26 July 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71626796 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. Postponed to Friday, 26th July . . .
PROGRAMME.
Leader - MR. W. F. OSBORNE.
PART I. OVERTURE - Cosi fan Tutti - Mozart . . . SYMPHONY - The surprise - Hayden . . .
PART II. OVERTURE - Zampa - Herrold . . . DUET - Violin and Piano - On Airs from "Guillaume Tell " - Mr. F. W. Osborne and Mrs. Murray - De Beriot and Osborne . . .

[Concert program] Miscellaneous music, 26 July 1850, Exchange, King William Street, Adelaide Choral Society; State Library of South Australia

https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/215553357 

[Advertisement], South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal (27 July 1850), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195940457 

ADELAIDE CHORAL SOCIETY. Postponed to Friday, 26th July . . .
[further postponed to] . . . Wednesday, 31st July . . .

[News], South Australian Register (1 August 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38442662

. . . As it was, however, the concert went off well. Mozart's overture "Cosi fan Tutti" was brilliantly executed . . . In the second part, a selection of airs from "Guillaume Tell," by Mr. Osborne on the violin and Mrs. Murray on the piano, were deservedly applauded . . .

"MR. A. MOORE'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (19 September 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207119155 

. . . The beneficiare conducted the instrumental pieces quite a la Julien, and wielded the baton with the true gusto of the disciples of that personage. Whether that circumstance, or the excellent leading of Messrs. Osborne and Lee were the cause we cannot say, but we assuredly never heard the Fra Diavoli Overture so well done since our first attending a Colonial concert . . .

"ASSEMBLY BALL", Adelaide Times (25 October 1850), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article206987184 

One of Monsieur Paris's Assembly Balls came off last night in the Exchange, and was tolerably well attended. The band was an efficient one, led by Mr. Osborne . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (21 May 1851), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38434977

"NOVEL ATROCITY", Adelaide Observer (26 July 1851), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article165043830 

Among, the many nefarious contrivances adopted for purposes of plunder by the lawless wretches who infest the outlets of the city and the lonely paths leading to the surrounding villages, the most atrocious we have heard of was lately resorted to in an attempt to rob Mr. Osborne, the respected leader of the Choral Society, one night this week, near Kensington. At a very secluded spot he encountered three men, one of whom attempted to throw a noosed rope over his head in the manner of the South American lasso. Mr. Osborne was, however, too alert for the ruffian, and made good, his retreat with the loss only of his hat . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (14 October 1851), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38450038

"MR. BANCROFT'S CONCERT", Adelaide Times (18 October 1851), 1 supplementary sheet

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207069982 

This affair, the expected excellence of which had been noised abroad for several weeks past, came off on Wednesday night, and was a dead failure. The performance of most of the morceaux, in the programme, was below mediocrity; and in one or two instances execrable. Madame Allen's rendering of that pretty, song from Balfe's Bondsman, "They say there is some distant land," was the only redeeming feature in the concert, the band, notwithstanding the exertions of Mr. Osborne, being atrocious . . .

"THURSDAY'S CONCERT", The Argus (7 April 1852), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4784216

The following is the programme of tomorrow's performance: . . . Solo - Violin, Mr. Osborne (his first appearance) . . .

[Advertisement], The Argus (5 June 1852), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4785541

[Advertisement], The Argus (31 July 1852), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4786543

[Advertisement], The Argus (9 August 1855), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4814687 

WANTED. Mr. F. W. Osborne to call at half past 8 o'clock To-day, at Astley's.

[Advertisement], Ovens and Murray Advertiser (7 January 1857), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113013572

GRAND PROMENADE CONCERT AND BALL, Every Evening, admission One Shilling.
MR. JAMES ELLIS, originator of the first casino in England, viz., the Adelaide Gallery, Strand, and Cremorne Gardens, London; the Salle de Valentino and Cremorne Gardens, Melbourne; begs to inform the public, that having secured the services of the celebrated Mdelle. Schluter, such a sensation at the Theatre Royal, Melbourne, together with Messrs. Burchall, King, and Hammond, and a host of other available talent, he intends giving a series of Promenade Concerts, on a scale unequalled in Beechworth.
Musical director - Herr Collin.
Leader - Mr. Ferdinand Osborne.
Maitre de ceremonies - Mr. King . . .

[Advertisement], Ovens and Murray Advertiser (16 March 1857), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113014470

ST. PATRICK'S DAY. GRAND BALL . . . ORCHESTRA.
Conductor - Mr. Hurley
Leader - Mr. Osborne
Violin Primo - Mr. Osborne
Violin Secundo - Herr Weichmann
Violin Secundo - Herr Carll
Harp - M. Zeplin
Pianoforte - M. Carrie
Contra Basso - Herr Esther
Picolo Solo - Mr. Hurley
Clarionet - Mr. Fowriere
Cornet a piston - Mr. Barlow
Trombone - Sig. Rangoni . . .

[Advertisement], Ovens and Murray Advertiser (15 February 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article113236690

STAR THEATRE . . . Proprietor, J. A. WALLACE, under the direction of JAMES ELLIS, Late of Cremorne Gardens, LONDON and MELBOURNE, &c. . . . OPERATIC COMPANY. First Night of Donizetti's Grand Opera LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR . . . MISS JULIA HARLAND . . . MR. WALTER SHERWIN . . . MR. FARQUHARSON . . . Conductor - Mr. LINLY NORMAN . . . Leader - Mr. Ferdinand Osborne . . .

[Advertisement], Ovens and Murray Advertiser (14 October 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112898605

. . . HALF MOON HOTEL, Lower Nine Mile . . . GRAND FREE BALL AND SUPPER, At the above Hotel, on Friday Evening, the 15th Oct., A SPLENDID ORCHESTRA is engaged, under the direction of the celebrated chef, Mr. FERDINAND OSBORNE. - DANCING to commence at 9 o'clock precisely . . .

"BUCKLAND POLICE COURT . . . Sly-Grog Selling", Ovens and Murray Advertiser (27 December 1862), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112892484

James Farely, storekeeper, Lower Buckland, appeared to answer to the information of Ferdinand W. Osborne, for illegally selling and supplying spirits on the 8th inst . . .

"CONCERT AT THE BUCKLAND", Ovens and Murray Advertiser (1 May 1866), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112908619 

We understand that a concert for the benefit of Mr F. W. Osborne (a gentleman well-known, in musical circles in that locality) will take place at Frank Scott's hotel, Lower Flat, Buckland, on Saturday next. The Growler's Creek Dramatic Club and several amateur instrumental performers have proffered their services for the occasion . . .

"MURRUMBURRAH", Australian Town and Country Journal (31 January 1880), 39

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70940709

On Anniversary Day some very good sports were held here on the racecourse paddock, which were fairly attended. In the evening a grand concert was held in the large room at Wright's Commercial Hotel in aid of the Irish famine relief fund, it being financially a success, the best local talent appearing; Mr. Ferdinand Osborne, a clever violinist, having kindly given his services gratis. We are very sorry that he is leaving the district so soon. He intends visiting Yass and Goulburn next.

IRISH FAMINE RELIEF FUND. MURRUMBURRAH (FROM A CORRESPONDENT), The Burrangong Argus (31 January 1880), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article247736510 

A CONCERT was given here at Dillon's Hotel on the 26th inst., Anniversary day, in aid of the Irish Famine Relief Fund, which may be said to have been the best and most successful concert ever given in this town. The celebrated violinist, Mr. Ferdinand Osborne (who is precluded from appearing in Sydney until Mde. Urso's concerts have concluded), gave his services on this occasion, and all I can say is that he fully realized all that was said of him. The concert commenced with a solo, brilliant variations on the favourite old air "Home sweet Home," beautifully played by Mr. Osborne, and enthusiastically received by the audience . . .

[Advertisement], Australian Town and Country Journal (24 December 1881) 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article70963589

FERDINAND OSBORNE (Solo Violin. Mr. A. Mellon's Concerts, Royal Italian Opera, Covent Garden; Royal Opera, St. Felice, Cadiz, &c.) will be in Sydney about the 22nd instant. Will organise Concert Company for New Zealand, &c.

"A PROMINENT VIOLINIST", Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (10 December 1897), 23

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99415185

. . . A correspondent now sends us the following with regard to the success of another young Riverina musician: - Miss Edie Warhurst, of whom a notice appeared in this journal some two years ago, passed her final examination by the Musical Association of Sydney on the 23rd ult., and with highest honors; the principal members of the examiners being M. Henri Kowalsky, Madame Charbonnet-Kellerman, Mr. Edgar Strauss, M. Staell, M. Kellerman, and M. Poussard. Her best pieces were the No. 24 of Kreutzer's Studies, March in C Minor, the great difficulties of which are well known to all professors of the violin, and the seventh concerto of De Beriot, one of the most beautiful, and certainly one of the most replete with difficulties by the charming virtuoso and composer . . . Miss Warhurst has been a pupil of M. Horace Poussard - without doubt the finest master in Sydney - for the last three years. Previously she was a pupil for four years of Mr. Ferdinand Osborne, himself a pupil of M. Baillot and M. Tolbecque, the principal professors at the Conservatoire of Paris . . .

"DEATHS", Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (16 December 1898), 40

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99975666

OSBORNE. - On 23rd November, at Urana, Ferdinand Osborne, professor of music.

"DEATH OF AN OLD BORDER RESIDENT", Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (16 December 1898), 23

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99975618

We regret having to record the death at Urana on the 23rd ult. of Professor Ferdinand Osborne. Mr. Osborne, who was a highly cultivated musician and pupil of some of the leading violinists of 40 years ago, had resided for many years in the Border districts. In 1860 he was at Myrtle Creek, and he subsequently removed to Bright where he resided for a long time, and practised as a teacher of vocal and instrumental music. Subsequently he crossed the river into New South Wales and for a considerable period occupied the position of private tutor in the family of Mr. Warhurst, of Hidewell. A few years ago he took a trip to the old country, and upon returning retired from the active practice of his profession, to live on a small annuity left him by a brother. By some misfortune the capital sum representing the annuity was lost, and he had to again fall back upon his art. This, however, was only for a short period, as an attack of illness, added to the burden of advanced years, soon afterwards terminated a long and active life. Mr. Osborne was a very well informed man, more especially in all matters connected with music, and he had been on intimate terms with several of the most celebrated composers of the middle of the century. He was a kind hearted, genial, upright man, generally respected by all who knew him.





OSBORNE, Robert James (Robert James OSBORNE; R. J. OSBORNE)

Comic vocalist, actor, manager, convict

Born ? England, c. 1826/27
Convicted larceny, Central Criminal Court, London, 23 October 1843 (aged 17)
Arrived VDL (TAS), 17 June 1845 (convict per Mount Stewart Elphinstone, from London, 7 March 1845)
Active Launceston, VDL (TAS), by April 1846
Married (1) Anne RICHARDSON (1833-1878), Bethesda chapel, Hobart, VDL (TAS), 24 July 1848
? Married (2) A. FRAMPTON, NSW, c. 1858 Active VIC, by 1859
Active Sale, VIC, until February 1863

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=R+J+Osborne+convict+actor (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OSBORNE-Robert-James (shareable link to this entry)

OSBORNE, Mrs. R. J. (Mrs. R. J. OSBORNE, "late Miss A. FRAMPTON")

Dancer, vocalist, ballad singer, entertainer

Active VIC, by c. 1858


Summary:

"MONSIEURS [sic] OSBORNE (From the London Theatres)" took the Olympic Theatre in Launceston in April 1846. There in May, Osborne was presenting a company described as the Sable Minstrels, perhaps one of the earliest actual companies of black-faced minstrels to appear in Australia. In June he was billed in a "COMIC SONG, "The Werry Identical Flute", by MR. OSBORNE, with drum and whistle accompaniment, by Masters F. and W. HOWSON, pupils of Mr. Osborne". On 10 July, "Mr. Howson and Sons" (presumably then Francis Howson senior and Masters F. and W.) took their benefit, which included:

A MUSICAL MELANGE.
SONG, "Parody on the Misletoe Bough", Mr. OSBORNE
OVERTURE - BY THE BAND.
AIR, with Variation (Violin) MR. HOWSON
OVERTURE - BY THE BAND.
By particular desire, SONG, "Parody on Buy a Broom, Mr. OSBORNE.
By particular desire, NAVAL HORNPIPE, by MR.COONEY
VENETIAN STATUES By Masters W. & F. Howson, pupils of Mr. Osborne.

Osborne was still at the Olympic in 1849, but had moved to Sydney and was lessee of the Olympic Arena there by 1854.


Documentation:

Old Bailey proceedings, 23 October 1843; Old Bailey online

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18431023-2828 

2828. ROBERT JAMES OSBORNE was indicted for stealing, on the 30th of Sept., at St. George in the East, 18 spoons, value 5l.; 1 pair of sugar tongs, 5s.; 1 cruet-frame, 10s.; 2 cruet stops, 2s.; 1 toast-rack, 5s.; 6 knives, 2s.; and 6 forks, 2s.; also, on the 29th of Sept., 1 sheet, 2s.; and 1 table-cloth; the goods of William Skeggs Francis, his master, in his dwelling-house; and that he had been before convicted of felony; to which he pleaded GUILTY. Aged 17.- Transported for Ten Years.

No. 15730 / Osborne Robert James; convict record; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:1423625; CON33/1/66;

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/1423625 

http://search.archives.tas.gov.au/ImageViewer/image_viewer.htm?CON33-1-66,269,175,F,60 

[Tickets-of-leave], The Cornwall Chronicle (5 July 1845), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66269754

. . . The Right Honourable the Secretary of State has been pleased to grant Tickets-of-Leave to the undermentioned convicts, per Mount Stuart Elphinstone: . . . Robert James Osborne . . .

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (29 April 1846), 330

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66270405

THEATRE ROYAL OLYMPIC. MONSIEURS OSBORNE, (from the London Theatres,) and MR. McDONALD, have made arrangements with Mr. Story, for the above premises, which will be opened in a few evenings. Further particulars will be given in a future advertisement. April 28.

"THE THEATRE", The Cornwall Chronicle (20 May 1846), 384

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65943977

There was a good attendance at the Olympic on Monday evening, to witness the production of "The Deserter," which had been announced with new scenery, dresses, and decorations. The principal character "Adalbert" was ably sustained by Osborne, who is likely to become a favorite . . . Osborne's comic singing told with the audience, however, we prefer his acting, and a little more experience will, as we said, make him a useful performer . . .

"THE THEATRE", The Cornwall Chronicle (10 June 1846), 439

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65941843

. . . Osborne is a clever young man, and by care and study, he cannot fail to become exceedingly popular. He possesses powers of conception as well as of action, which enable him to understand his parts, and make the most of them. His imitations of celebrated London and Colonial actors are good. Real talent is sure to develop itself, and as sure to be eventually appreciated . . .

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (10 June 1846), 440

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65941832

. . . Negro Melody, "Jem Brown," with the original native music, MR. OSBORNE . . .

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (17 June 1846), 461

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65943669

. . . Comic Song, "The Werry Indentical Flute," by Mr. Osborne, with drum and whistle accompaniment, by Masters F. and W. Howson, pupils of Mr. Osborne . . .

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (4 July 1846), 512

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65942131

. . . Mr. Osborne will Sing "Unhappy Jeremiah," in the Pit . . .

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (8 July 1846), 522

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65944085

. . . SONG, "Parody on the Missletoe Bough," Mr. OSBORNE . . .
By particular desire, SONG, "Parody on Buy a Broom," Mr. OSBORNE . . .

[Advertisement], Launceston Examiner (25 July 1846), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36245677 

On MONDAY EVENING, July 27, 1846 . . .
MUSICAL MELANGE. Mr. Osborne will Extemporise on any subject given by the audience . . .

[Conditional pardons], The Cornwall Chronicle (5 December 1846), 948

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65941608

"CONVICT DEPARTMENT", Colonial Times (7 December 1847), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8761882 

It is hereby notified that his Excellency has received a despatch from the Right Honourable the Secretary of State, conveying her Majesty's approval of Pardons being granted to the undermentioned individuals, upon condition that they shall not return to or be found within the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland: - . . . M. S. Elphinstone. - William Adams; Samuel Battye; George McCabe; Robert J. Osborne . . .

Marriages in the district of Hobart, 1848; Tasmanian names index; NAME_INDEXES:836637; RGD37/1/7 no 1716

https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/836637 

https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD37-1-7$init=RGD37-1-7p122 

[Advertisement], The Cornwall Chronicle (27 October 1849), 963

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65976386 

ROYAL OLYMPIC THEATRE. MONDAY and WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29 & 31 . . . the performance will commence with the new local comic Pantomime, with entirely new scenery, machinery, dresses, tricks, and transformation, entitled, HARLEQUIN IN CALIFORNIA; Or, Emigration from Tasmania; and the Fiend of the GOLD MINE. Song, Mr. West, as sung by Mr. Rainsford, in the "Shipwreck of the Medusa." Dance, Master Wright . . . R. J. OSBORNE, Manager.

"ROYAL OLYMPIC ARENA", Illustrated Sydney News (13 May 1854), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63614309 

We were both surprised and pleased by a visit to this place of amusement, which was thrown open to the public on Tuesday evening. The entertainments were of a very varied and attractive character, and there was a total absence of that pretension which may be seen elsewhere, but which the performances elsewhere do not sustain. Mr. R. J. Osborne, the lessee of this little theatre, has much cleverness, and possesses a most decided talent for comedy. For any of our readers who may be suffering from an attack of the blues, we prescribe Mr. Osborne's song of "The Unfortunate Man" as an infallible remedy. Some very clever and difficult feats of skill and strength were executed by. Professor Wieland, and by Professor Seigrist and his son. Mr. Osborne, in his part of caterer for the public amusement, has laid even the canine tribe under contribution; and, under his instruction, the "Dog Jonathan" has reached a pitch of docile intelligence which some who are not quadrupeds, if they had sense enough, might envy. We should be unjust if we omitted to notice the very striking pianoforte-playing, of Mdlle. Elise Clauss. This young lady possesses a real genius for music, and would be an acquisition to the most fashionable concert. She plays with taste and feeling, her execution is brilliant, and her touch is light, yet decided. Indeed, the pleasure of hearing Mdlle. Clauss's playing would alone be worth the price of admission. On the whole, we were highly pleased with the performances at the Olympic; and, as this new theatre becomes more generally known, we predict for it an increasing success.

"SYDNEY POLICE COURT . . . RIVALS IN THE OLYMPIC", Empire (25 May 1854), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60196425

John Malcolm, proprietor of the Royal Amphitheatre, York-street, was charged by Robert James Osborne, lessee of the Olympic Arena, Castlereagh-street, with having on the previous evening forcibly entered his (Osborne's) premises . . .

"THEATRICAL APPRENTICES AGAIN", Colonial Times (29 December 1854), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8778583 

YESTERDAY, at the Police Court, Mr. Robert J. Osborne complained by information of Thomas Stevens and John Buckley, better known as professor Wieland and Hernandez, his indentured apprentices, with absenting themselves from their service without their master's leave . . .

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (1 February 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13005687 

[Advertisement], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (24 April 1858), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article18645310 

FOLEY'S AMERICAN CIRCUS . . . LIST OF COMPANY: Messrs. W. H. Foley, C. Devere, A. Palmer, W. Hingler, T. Bird, R. H. Osborne, Madame Tournaire, Miss A. Frampton, Miss Le Gray, &c., &c. . . .

[Advertisement], The Goulburn Herald and County of Argyle Advertiser (27 October 1858), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article118247071 

MR. R. J. OSBORNE'S TROUPE . . .
MR. R. J. OSBORNE, Late Manager of the Prince of Wales Theatre, Sydney.
MRS, R. J. OSBORNE, Late Miss A. FRAMPTON, Premier Danseuse.
MR. J. FRAZER, Vocalist from the Melbourne Theatres . . .

"BUTLER'S NEW EAGLE THEATRE", Ovens and Murray Advertiser (1 August 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article112906249 

On Monday evening last a complimentary benefit was given to Mrs. Osborne. The house was crowded to the ceiling, and the entertainments met with their usual success. The fair beneficiaire has proved herself possessed of great powers of originality, and naturalness, coupled with that naivete which forms the great charm of acting. The favorable opinion pronounced by us upon the merits of this young lady, whose appearance in this district has been an immense success, is fully confirmed: as a danseuse, actress, and singer, she exhibits qualities which hold out to her the prospect of a bright future. Mr. Osborne is an actor of no mean pretensions. His powers of mimicry are abundant, his repertoire of songs (mostly on local subjects) bring forth thunders of applause, and the redundant jests and flow of witticisms in his characteristic impersonations are of a superior character. The success which has attended the performance of these clever artistes is most satisfactory. This week they continue their popular entertainment at the above place of amusement, and on Saturday evening (the last night) the whole of the proceeds will be handed over to the committee for the benefit of the Ovens District Hospital.

[Advertisement], The Golden Age [Queanbeyan] (21 August 1862), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30632807 

. . . Mr. R. J. OSBORNE, Polyphonist, Buffo Vocalist, Commedian [sic], &c. . . .

"OLD TIMES", Evening News (8 February 1908), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article114107888 

Prince of Wales' Theatre. - "Mazeppa, or the Wild Horse of Tartary" (real horses); "Alonzo the Brave;", grand equestrian spectacle, four cats harnessed; "Fall of Delhi;" the new comic pantomime, "Harlequin Emigration, or the Demon of Discord and Fairies of the Little Golden Palace," produced under the direction of Mr. R. J. Osborne. New music composed by Mr. Charles Eigenschenck. Scenery, Mr. Guy; machinery, Mr. Rain.

[see 1 February 1858 above]




OSBORNE, S. (S. OSBORNE)

Teacher of music, composer

Active Sydney, NSW, 1876

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OSBORNE-S (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (31 August 1876), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13379273

MRS. S. OSBORNE begs to notify to the inhabitants of the Glebe, that she has opened a SCHOOL for young ladies, in music and English; and will be glad to make terms for a limited number of pupils. 50, Derwent-street, Glebe.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (28 September 1876), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13380652 

NEW MUSIC - The NEREDAH GALOP, by composer of Rose d'Amor Galop, 2s. 6d. Reading and Co.

"MUSIC", The Sydney Morning Herald (30 September 1876), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13380760

MUSIC - A few days ago we received from the composer Mrs. Osborne, a galop entitled the Neredah Galop dedicated to Miss Neredah Robinson, Government House. The galop commences in the key of F and changes into the key of B flat, taking up a second air, and again changing to the original theme. The music is printed by Messrs S. T. Leigh and Co.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (23 October 1876), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13382084

NEREDAH GALOP, by Mrs. S. Osborne, price 2s. 6d.
Naida, Grand Galop de Concert. by R. H. L. Watson, R.A.M., 2s. 6d.
The Sydney Polka Mazurka, by Master John Stevens, 2s. 6d.
The Zealandia Polka Mazurka, by Luscombe Searell, 2s. 6d.
CLARKE, No. 235. George-street.


Musical work:

Neredah galop (dedicated to Miss Neredah Robinson, Government House) ([Sydney: printed by S. T. Leigh, 1876])

NO COPY IDENTIFIED




O'SULLIVAN, Charles J.

Pianist

See Charles J. SULLIVAN




OTTO, Madame S. (Madame OTTO)

Vocalist

Active SA, 1851

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Madame+Otto (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OTTO-Madame (shareable link to this entry)

OTTO, Herr (Herr OTTO)

Vocalist

Active SA, 1859

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OTTO-Herr (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"CONCERT AT THE BURRA HOTEL", South Australian Gazette and Mining Journal (19 April 1851), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article195942162 

Mr. Bambrick, whose last concert, and particularly his own part of it, elicited so much eclat at Kooringa, has announced a grand concert, to take place on the evening of Easter Monday, the 21st inst, on which occasion will appear Madame S. Otto (guitar accompaniment), who will sing a solo, "Les Adieux" (The Adieus), composed by Dressler. The reported high attainments of this little German nightingale will, no doubt, secure a crowded audience.

"KOORINGA", South Australian Register (30 April 1851), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38452078 

Mr. Bambrick's second concert took place on Saturday, the 26th instant, when Madame Allen [recte Madame Otto] again appeared. Her reception on this occasion was most triumphant; one universal feeling of inexpressible rapture prevailed; every song was loudly encored, and the lady resumed her seat amidst great applause. The third concert, which is announced for some day this week, is looked forward to with no small degree of interest. This little Jenny Lind of the Burra seems to have quite infatuated the elite of the North.

"MR. BAMBRICK'S CONCERT", South Australian Register (7 May 1851), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article38444302 

We desire to correct an error in the notice of Mr. Bambrick's second concert at the Burra Hotel, which appeared in the Register of Wednesday last, and in which Madame Allen's name was inadvertently introduced instead of that of Madame Otto.

"TANUNDA [From our own Correspondent] Tanunda. October 8", South Australian Register (10 October 1859), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49825367 

The usual quietness of this township was agreeably interrupted on Thursday, the 6th inst., by a musical entertainment at the Tanunda Hotel. On that day the Tanunda Band, conducted by Mr. F. Draeger, celebrated their second anniversary, inviting to it a number of friends, whom they entertained during the evening with the performance of a variety of musical pieces selected for the occasion. The festival was opened at about 8 o'clock with Rossini's overture to "L'Italiani-Algieri," then followed in succession . . . "Ave Maria" by Kuecken, sung by Herr Otto . . . Kreutzer's "Kapelle," sung by Messrs. Fischer, Otto, Barton, and Wiener . . . Beethoven's "Adelaide," sung by Herr Otto . . .




OUGDEN, Miss (Miss OUGDEN)

Pianist, vocalist

Active Perth, WA, by 1852; ? eldest daughter of James OUGDEN

OUGDEN, Martha Hannah

= Mrs. Alfred Perkins CURTIS

Pianist, vocalist

Born c. 1839; second daughter of James OUGDEN
Married Alfred Perkins CURTIS, St. George's Church, Perth, WA, 16 August 1856
Died Perth, WA, 20 February 1923, in her 85th year

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Martha+Ougden+Curtis+d1923 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OUGDEN-Martha (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"THE AMATEUR CONCERT", The Perth Gazette and Independent Journal of Politics and News (25 June 1852), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3173549 

THE concert in aid of funds for promoting a Musical Class for the Mechanics' Institute, took place at the Court House in Perth last Friday evening . . . The two Misses Ougden performed the Overture to La Dame Blanche very pleasingly on the piano; and Mr. E. Hamersley played an excellent accompaniment to the Rosita Waltz on the Cornet a Piston; Mr. A. H. Stone ably conducted the whole performance. The vocal parts were undertaken by Messrs William Clifton, Bell and Parry . . . We had almost forgotten to mention that the musical bell-ringers played several popular airs between the parts, with which the audience seemed much pleased.

"MARRIED", The Inquirer and Commercial News (27 August 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66005177 

"Local and Domestic Intelligence", The Inquirer and Commercial News (14 October 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66005336 

A public Tea-Meeting - the proceeds of which are to be devoted to the enlargement and improvement of the Congregational Chapel, Fremantle - took place in the Boy's School-room there on the evening of Tuesday, 6th inst., on which occasion the lovers of sacred music enjoyed a treat unprecedented in this colony. Mr. Curtis, organist of St. George's Church, Perth, presided at the piano, accompanied by the choirs of Perth and Fremantle. The anthem "Awake, awake," was given with excellent time and tone, followed by another and chorus "Soon shall the trumpet sound," in which the fine tenor voice of Mr. Crowther was heard to perfection. A trio "The Vesper Song at Sea," sung by Mrs. C. Duffield, Mr. H. Birch, and Corporal Scott, R.E., was much admired, and displayed good taste; followed by "Sound the loud timbrel," by Mr. and Mrs. Curtis and Mrs. Maycock, which was also much praised; other pieces being sung by Misses Oakley, Ougden, Pearse, and Paterson . . .

"Local and Domestic Intelligence", The Inquirer and Commercial News (19 September 1860), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66009605 

Last Wednesday evening a very interesting and happy assembly of about 150 persons met together in the Wesleyan Sunday Schoolroom . . . Mention must not be omitted to be made of the good services rendered by the ladies and gentlemen composing the choir, who sang several anthems very effectively during the evening, the Harmonium giving forth its solemn, melodious roll under the skilful touch of Miss Ougden.

"DIED", The Daily News (22 February 1923), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article82516048 

CURTIS. - On February 20, 1923, at her late residence, 30 Beaufort-street, Perth, Martha Hannah, widow of the late Alfred P. Curtis, in her 85th year. Privately interred.




OUGH, Thomas (Thomas OUGH)

Amateur musician, bandmaster (The Adelaide Brass and Reed Band), clarinet player, stone mason

Born Devon, England, c.1799
Arrived Adelaide, SA, 19 September 1839 (per Recovery, from England, 21 May)
Died Mount Pleasant, SA, 15 July 1870, aged 71, a colonist of 31 years

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Thomas+Ough+d1870 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OUGH-Thomas (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

"EXTRACTS FROM SETTLERS' LETTERS", The South Australian Colonist and Settlers' Weekly Record of British, Foreign and Colonial Intelligence [UK] (19 May 1840), 161

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article228133333 

. . . The following letter from South Australia appeared in the Plymouth Herald on the 9th inst . . . Thomas Ough (by trade a mason,) from whom the letter came, held the situation of district Postman in Plymouth for several years, and therefore must have been generally known in the town, and, from the character he bore, no doubt was equally respected . . . [letter dated] "Adelaide, October, 27, 1839. Dear Brother . . .. THOMAS OUGH

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (29 March 1854), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article48551182

MUSIC. THE ADELAIDE BRASS and REED BAND is now reorganized under the direction of Mr. Taylor, late Leader of Wombwell's Brass Band. Parties requiring the service of the above Band must apply on Tuesday or Friday evening at the practice-room. Thistle Inn, Weymouth-street; or to Mr. Taylor, Everett's Cottage, Grote-street. THOMAS OUGH, Band-Master. Adelaide, March 24, 1854.

"LAW AND CRIMINAL COURTS", South Australian Register (9 November 1855), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article49295554

The plaintiff deposed that on the evening of June 21 he was engaged as a musician at the Black Swan. He left at half-past 9 with two other men. In passing through Light-square, the defendant drove up, with himself and two other men in his cart, and on their rounding a corner he was knocked down by the cart, and received serious bodily injury. He had a double bass Saxe-horn under his arm, which cost him £12. It was also run over, and damaged. Its repair cost him £2 10s. He was a mason, and in consequence of the injury he had sustained he lost eight weeks' work . . . This was corroborated by the evidence of Wm. Jenkins and Wm. Denton, the plaintiff's musical companions.

"SUPREME COURT - CRIMINAL SITTINGS", The South Australian Advertiser (12 February 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article830338 

. . . Thomas Ough, of Mount Pleasant, mason, applied to be excused, on account of deafness. He said he had assisted in the building of the Supreme Court, and having accidentally been precipitated from the scaffolding, it had shattered his acoustic nerves so much that that he was incapacitated from hearing evidence. His Honor having ascertained that Mr. Ough had really taken a hand in the erection of the highest legal temple of the colony, and had one of his faculties impaired thereby, pronounced it to be a very proper and sufficient reason for exercising the indulgence of the Court, and without further hesitation excused him.

"MOUNT PLEASANT", South Australian Register (24 October 1861), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article50081403

. . . After the tea-tables were cleared, dancing commenced to the enlivening sounds of the violin and clarionet, ably handled by our old and respected friends Mr. H. Bushell and Mr. Thomas Ough, assisted occasionally by the piano, which was presided over by Mrs. T. N. Lewis - one of the guests of the evening . . .

"DEATHS", South Australian Register (20 July 1870), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article39201512

OUGH. - On the 15th July, at his residence, Mount Pleasant, Thomas Ough, after a long and painful illness, aged 71 years - a colonist of 31 years.




OUSEY, Harriet (Harriet OUSY; Miss H. OUSEY)

Teacher of the Pianoforte

Born Manchester, England, 4th quarter, 1837; daughter of Joseph OUSEY (d. 1870) and Harriet MEASHAM (d. 1888)
Active Melbourne, VIC, by 1857
Died Lilydale, VIC, 1922, aged 86

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OUSEY-Harriet (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

England census, 30 March 1851; Manchester; 255 Deansgate

https://www.ancestry.com.au/interactive/8860/30859_A008135-00068/36356554 (PAYWALL)

[Advertisement], The Argus (4 April 1857), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7147441

MISS OUSEY RECEIVES or Attends PUPILS for the PIANOFORTE. Church-street, near the Swan Inn, Richmond.

[Advertisement], The Argus (12 June 1857), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7133420

  [Advertisement], The Argus (27 August 1859), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5687036

[Advertisement], The Argus (9 July 1862), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5718009

? "DESTRUCTIVE FIRE IN EAST KYNETON", The Argus (3 March 1866), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5768385

[Advertisement], The Lilydale Express (15 November 1918), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article74600521 

IRWELL SCHOOL OF MUSIC. Clarke Street, Lilydale. Principal: Miss H. OUSEY. (Registered Teacher of Music.) Formerly Organist at the Independent Church, Hawthorn. Piano, Theory, Organ. Pupils must have passed in Theory at either the University or Trinity College of Music, London, before learning the organ. Miss Ousey was trained in England, under one of the organists of the Manchester Cathedral. Miss Ousey's pupils have passed at the Melbourne University, Trinity College of Music, London, and at the Education Department, Melbourne.




O-WAI

Chinese musician

Active Ballarat, VIC, 1856

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#O-WAI (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Star (30 November 1856), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66039902

. . . THE CELEBRATED CHINESE MUSICIANS, O-Wai and A-Fou, Principal Musicians to the O-ho of Tibet, Lassa, will perform SOLOS, DUETS, &c. During the evening on the KAI-PI! and HUC-MUC! . . .

"THEATRES", The Star (4 November 1856), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66039954

. . . Our reporter being unable to obtain admission at the Montezuma last night, writes: - Proceeding outwards to the Celestial entertainment we met with a more benign reception. The great attraction of the evening was the performance of six Chinese upon certain musical instruments The number of persons present was about 2000, there being a great muster of Celestials. The principal performers were O-Wai and A-Fou, but what particular instruments they played we are at a loss to say. Out of the six musicians three performed on what bears some remote resemblance to an English violin; the bow used being somewhat similar to that used with a violincello. Two others performed on instruments played in the same fashion as a guitar, and the sixth had a small basket placed before him, fixed on three pieces of wood, which was evidently meant to represent a drum. This basket the performer beat with two very small drumsticks occasionally accompanying the action by singing. To say that these six Chinese 'discoursed most eloquent music', would be to make a great mistake, as the sound produced reminded us of certainly nothing terrestrial which we ever heard before. The novelty of this entertainment drew a large company, together, but the music was far too peculiar to be generally appreciated.

"A CHINESE CONCERT ON BALLARAT", The Argus (5 November 1856), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article7139523

"A CHINESE CONCERT ON BALLARAT", The Perth Gazette (16 January 1857), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2929721




OWEN, Robert (Robert OWEN; Mr. R. A. R. OWEN)

Musician, pianist, music teacher

Arrived Melbourne, VIC, 12 November 1852 (per Great Britain, from Liverpool, 21 August)
Active Ballarat, VIC, until May 1861
Died Thames, New Zealand, 25 October 1894

https://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=R+A+R+Owen+musician+d1894 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

https://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/register-O.php#OWEN-Robert (shareable link to this entry)


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Argus (6 February 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4802849 

GRAND Concert every evening at the Casino, top of Stephen-street, near the Olive Branch, under the direction of Mr. Owen, assisted by Madame Camille, Messrs. Leman, Hill and Jones.

[Advertisement], The Argus (30 June 1855), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4810050 

CHARLIE NAPIER HOTEL, Ballaarat. Concerts for the People. Open Every Evening. Enlargement of the Grand Concert Hoom, Mrs. Hancock, Mr. Hancock, Mr. Lyall, and Mr. Thatcher. Mr. Owen presides at the Pianoforte. Admission, 1s. Reserve Seats, 2s. 6d. Observe Alteration of Time. Doors Open at Seven o'Clock, Commence at half-past Seven o'Clock.

"NEWS AND NOTES", The Star (2 April 1861), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66338311 

The burlesque of the "Nymph of the Lurleyburg" was brought out last night at the Royal, before a crowded house, and notwithstanding a few hitches both in the dialogue and the management of the scenery, the production was very successful. The plot consists of the adventures of a "hard up" German Sir Rupert (Mrs. Holt), who is dreadfully in love with Lady Una, "a young heiress," on the Rhine (Mrs. Gill). Sir Rupert has "a still harder-up" Seneschal (Mr. Holt), and a rival (Mr. Manly), and the Lady Una's parent (Mr. Sherwin), is absolute in his refusal of consent to the union of the Lady Una and Sir Rupert, whereupon Sir Rupert repairs to the cave of Lurline (Madame Carandini) for advice, and has the ill luck to fall desperately in love with her too, and promises her marriage. Out of all this there came lots of peccadillos, and outrageously nonsensical feats of flood and field, puns of indescribable atrocity, and local allusions of a very harmless nature. The make-up of the characters was splendid, and Mr. Holt was very happy in his fun, for he was the droll of the piece, and did the business capitally. Madame Carandini was not in very good voice, but sang the music of the part with a will that made her right welcome; and Mr Sherwin and his supporters, in the musical portion of the burlesque, also did very well. We should mention here that the parodies in "The Muleteer," sung by Mr. Sherwin, and "Sweet Agnes" and "Riflemen Form," sung by Madame Carandini, were written by Mr. R. A. R. Owen . . .

"DEATH OF MR. R. A. R. OWEN", Thames Advertiser [NZ] (26 October 1894), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/THA18941026.2.7 

The numerous Thames friends of Mr. R. A. R. Owen, will learn with sincere regret, and no doubt, with great surprise, of his death, which look place at the Hospital last night. Deceased has been ailing for some considerable time past, but he was never sufficiently indisposed to prevent him from following his avocation of music teaching. It appears, however, that he was admitted to the Hospital about 9.30 o'clock, and about two hours afterwards he rolled clean out of bed onto the floor, and when picked up immediately afterwards, it was found that life was quite extinct. He was of a genial, kindly disposition, and a through musician, and his demise will be deeply regretted by a very large circle of acquaintances.

"DEATH OF MR R. A. R. OWEN", Thames Star [NZ] (26 October 1894), 2

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/THS18941026.2.26 

Universal regret was expressed this morning when the news of the death of Mr. R. A. R. Owen, the well-known musician, became known throughout the town. For the last two or three years the deceased had been suffering from a gradually increasing affection of the heart, and a short time ago he took a trip to Auckland in the hope that the change would benefit his health. He returned to the Thames by boat yesterday afternoon, and at once proceeded to the residence of Mr. Horatio Phillips, in Sealey street. He was then suffering great pain, and his condition became such that it was thought advisable to remove him to the Hospital, where he arrived at about 8 o'clock. He was at that time in his usual spirits, but gradually sank, and about 12 o'clock he rolled out of bed on to the floor, and when picked up immediately afterwards it was found that life was quite extinct. Mr. Owen, who was 60 years of age, was a native of Carnarvonshire, Wales, and attended the City of London School along with Mr. Phillips, with whom he was very intimate. After he left school he was for some time a clerk in the London Stock Exchange, but in August, 1852, he decided to proceed to the colonies, leaving in the Great Britain, then on her first voyage. He first visited Victoria, and after a sojourn there departed for New Zealand about the time of the Gabriel's Gully rush. He next resided at Wanganui, and other parts of the colony, and subsequently came to the Thames, where he has lived for the last 20 years. The deceased had no relatives in the colony, and only a distant cousin at Home. Mr. Owen revisited the Old Country some years back, and was contemplating another trip. He was a gentleman of great musical abilities, being noted as a pianist, and on the occasion of the grand band contest held in Auckland some years back was one of the judges. Deceased was a good linguist, speaking Greek, Latin, Spanish, Italian, and German with great fluency. The funeral of the deceased gentleman will leave the Hospital tomorrow afternoon for Shortland Cemetery at 3 o'clock.




OXBERRY, Mr. (Mr. OXBERRY; William OXBERRY)

See William Penphrase







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