Biomedical Engineering

For a standard enrolment plan for Biomedical Engineering visit CUSP.

Unit outlines will be available through Find a unit outline two weeks before the first day of teaching for 1000-level and 5000-level units, or one week before the first day of teaching for all other units.
 

Biomedical Engineering Stream Combined Degrees

To qualify for the Bachelor of Engineering Honours component in the combined degree, students must complete the following:
(a) 42 credit points from the Engineering Core Table, consisting of:
(i) 18 credit points of Engineering Foundation units
(ii) 24 credit points of Project units
(iii) The requirements of the Professional Engagement Program
(b) 102 credit points from the Biomedical Engineering Stream table, consisting of:
(i) 78 credit points of Stream Core units
(ii) 6 credit points of Stream Core Option units
(iii) 18 credit points of Stream Elective units
Stream Core units
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
ELEC1103 Fundamentals of Elec and Electronic Eng

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, and PHYS1003 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. This is a foundation unit in circuit theory. Circuit theory is the electrical engineer's fundamental tool.
The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of electronics, instrumentation, electrical machines, power systems, communication systems, and signal processing.
Topics: a) Basic electrical and electronic circuit concepts: Circuits, circuit elements, circuit laws, node and mesh analysis, circuit theorems, energy storage, capacitors and inductors, circuits with switches, transient response, sine waves and complex analysis, phasors, impedance, ac power. ; b) Project management, teamwork, ethics; c) Safety issues
AMME1362 Materials 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL2110 or CIVL1110 or AMME2302 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AMME1362 is an introductory course in engineering materials. The unit aims to develop students' understanding of the structures, mechanical properties and manufacture of a range of engineering materials as well as how the mechanical properties relate to microstructure and forming and treatment methods. The unit has no prerequisite subject and is therefore intended for those with little or no previous background in engineering materials. However the unit does require students to take a significant degree of independent responsibility for developing their own background knowledge of materials and their properties. The electrical, magnetic, thermal and optical properties of materials are a critical need-to-know area where students are expected to do most of their learning by independent study.
AMME1802 Engineering Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: CIVL1802 or ENGG1802 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to provide students with an understanding of and competence in solving statics and introductory dynamics problems in engineering. Tutorial sessions will help students to improve their group work and problem solving skills, and gain competency in extracting a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation. Emphasis is placed on the ability to work in 3D as well as 2D, including the 2D and 3D visualisation of structures and structural components, and the vectorial 2D and 3D representations of spatial points, forces and moments. Introduction to kinematics and dynamics topics includes position, velocity and acceleration of a point; relative motion, force and acceleration, momentum, collisions and energy methods.
BMET1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME1961 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: HSC Biology and HSC Chemistry. Summer bridging courses are available for students who did not complete HSC Biology or Chemistry
This biomedical engineering core junior unit of study provides an introduction to the relatively recent, and rapidly growing, biotechnology industry, with a focus on the current key commercial applications. In the 1990s, the word 'biotech' entered our lexicon as a synonym for overnight investment wealth. The biotechnology acronym GM (genetically modified) also entered our lexicon in the 1990s. Biotechnology can be broadly defined as the commercial exploitation of biological processes for industrial and other purposes. A significant focus for commercial activities has been GM technology: GM microorganisms, plants, animals, and even humans (gene therapy). The 'biotech industry' arose rapidly in the late 20th century, and is now one of the largest industries in the world, and is one of the cornerstones of the global biomedical industry which comprises three main sectors: Medical Devices, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotechnology. Significant global commercial biotechnology activity concerns the manufacture of therapeutic compounds from GM microorganisms using bioreactors, for example insulin. Another significant sector is agricultural: 'agri-biotech' which concerns GM higher lifeforms (plants and animals) primarily for the food industry, and also other industries such as the energy industry (biofuels). The third sector concerns therapeutic GM of humans, known as 'gene-therapy'. Some other important biotechnologies will also be explored including monoclonal antibodies, genome sequencing and personalised medicine, and RNA-interference technology (RNAi).
BMET2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR ENGG1800 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1961 OR [BIOL1xxx]) AND [6cp 1000-level Chemistry] Prohibitions: MECH2901 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides the underpinning knowledge needed in biomedical engineering designs. The anatomic and physiological functional knowledge gained in this subject will enhance prototype development of biomedical designs. Students should gain familiarity with anatomical and physiological terms and their meaning, understanding of the gross anatomy of the major systems in the human body and their importance in the design of biomedical devices and understanding of the major physiological principles which govern the operation of the human body.
BMET2903 Biomedical Physics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: 12cp of 1000-level MATH units of study Prohibitions: BMET9903 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers essential knowledge of physics for applications in biomedical engineering, medicine and medical sciences. The unit will cover fundamentals concepts of electromagnetism, optics and quantum physics - these concepts are becoming rapidly relevant and vital with new and emerging technologies in the biomedical and health sector. It is imperative for the next generation of biomedical engineers and healthcare providers to develop a strong foundational knowledge in these concepts in the context of biomedicine. The knowledge provided by this unit is intended to prepare the students to be able to understand pivotal technologies used in medical research and the medical clinic, such as fluorescence based imaging, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetotherapy.
BMET2922 Computational Analysis for Biomedical Signals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET9922 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of basic biomedical engineering principles (BMET1960) and basic programming (ENGG1801 or ENGG1810 or INFO1110). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomedical engineering is being deeply reshaped by the advancements in computational tools and the utilisation of rich data. This unit will explore the processes involved in designing and building systems to perform computational analysis on biological signals, using microcontrollers and desktop or server computing. The main teaching activities will focus on the theory and practical skills for data capture, cleaning, communication, storage, and analytics. The purpose is to ensure that students develop the skills necessary to design systems that can be used for monitoring of patients, where the data can be used for analytics, e.g. prediction of an adverse event. This is relevant to a number of applications in modern healthcare such as continuous and remote monitoring devices. The unit will develop core skills in programming, solution design, sensor interfacing, and data analysis.
BMET2960 Biomedical Engineering 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) Prohibitions: AMME2960 Assumed knowledge: (AMME1960 OR BMET1960) AND (AMME1961 OR BMET1961) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2 is the third of the four Biomedical Engineering foundational units. The first (AMME1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A) introduces students to the discipline of biomedical engineering, covering the key concepts of biomedical technology, design, biomechanics, and the important systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective. The second (AMME1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B) is an introduction to Biotechnology. The fourth (MECH2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers) provides a hands-on anatomy and physiology study of the key systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective and includes cadaver laboratories. This unit (AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2) is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems, including conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The mathematical tools covered in the lectures include: deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches. There is a strong emphasis in both the lectures and tutorials on applying these mathematical methods to real biomedical engineering problems involving electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical mechanisms in the human body. Specific examples include heat regulation, vibrations in biological systems, and the analysis of physiological signals such as ECG and EEG.
BMET3660 Biomanufacturing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: BMET1960 or BMET1961 or ENGG1800 Prohibitions: MECH3660 OR AMME3660 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to teach the fundamentals of biomedical manufacturing processes, including traditional and advanced manufacturing technologies. This unit aims to develop the following attributes: to understand the fundamental principles of biomedical manufacturing approaches; to gain the ability to understand and select appropriate manufacturing processes and systems for biomedical applications; to develop ability to create innovative new manufacturing technologies for medical bionics and other applications in biomedical engineering; to develop ability to invent new manufacturing systems suitable for biomedical engineering implementation. At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: merits and advantages of individual manufacturing processes and systems used in the fabrication of medical devices and products that support human health and well-being; principles of developing new technologies for biomedical engineering applications; comprehensive applications and strategic selection of manufacturing processes and systems within the regulatory landscape of biomedical manufacturing. Unit content will include: Materials Processing: An introduction into the use of joining, moulding, and other manufacturing processes. Rapid Prototyping: An introduction into the most current prototyping methods currently in use. Manufacturing Processes: Common processes and their science (machining, moulding, sintering, materials processing, joining processes) and their relative merits and limitations.
BMET3921 Biomedical Design and Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MECH2901 or BMET2901 or MEDS2001 or PHSI2X07 or BDSN2001 Prohibitions: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 OR BMET9921 Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of human physiology and anatomy and an understanding of the engineering design process. Students are recommended to have completed 36cp of 2000-level or higher units before attempting this unit. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an understanding of the Australian and International biomedical industry and in the development, manufacture and uses of biomedical engineering products in therapeutic, rehabilitation and clinical settings. Students will gain an understanding of the process of biomedical regulation in Australia and other major international markets as well as the entire process of creating a new biomedical engineering product, from design through to marketing and monitoring of the product. Students will design a biomedical device including the preparation of a detailed design brief. This will be done as a team project. Each team will work on a specific biomedical design project following formal design protocols, including design control, regulatory considerations, and commercialisation/IP considerations.
BMET3961 Biomaterials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ENGG1960 or AMME1802 or ENGG1802 or PHYS1001) and (AMME2302 or AMME1362) and (MECH2901 or BMET2901 or (MEDS2005 and (MEDS2001 or PHSI2007))) Prohibitions: MECH4961 or BMET4961 or AMME9961 or BMET9961 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will build on knowledge in materials science and merge knowledge in the biomedical sciences, in particular with the aspects of the human anatomy and physiology. The students will appreciate that developing engineering solutions to solve problems associated with the human body will bring forward a unique set of constraints and conditions not found in alternate contexts. For example, the human body is composed of living constituents called 'cells' that produce matter called 'tissues' in a structured manner to form functioning systems called 'organs'. The function(s) of these cells is heavily dependent on the surrounding physical and chemical cues - the parameters (for which there are multiple) of these cues have to be 'right' or 'optimal' for the cells to function well to produce the correct type of tissue for the correct functioning of the organ. A biomedical engineering solution (e.g. an implantable or wearable device) to treat, monitor or diagnose a disease or medical condition must take these parameters into serious consideration.
BMET3971 Tissue Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MECH2901 or BMET2901 or [MEDS2005 and (MEDS2001 or PHSI2007)] Prohibitions: AMME4971 or BMET4971 or AMME9971 or BMET9971 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With the severe worldwide shortage of donor organs and the ubiquitous problem of donor organ rejection, there is a strong need for developing technologies for engineering replacement organs and other body parts. Recent developments in engineering and the life sciences have begun to make this possible, and as a consequence, the very new and multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering has been making dramatic progress in the last few years. This unit will provide an introduction to the principles of tissue engineering, as well as an up to date overview of recent progress and future outlook in the field of tissue engineering. This unit assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of tissue engineering. The objectives are: To gain a basic understanding of the major areas of interest in tissue engineering; To learn to apply basic engineering principles to tissue engineering systems; To understand the promises and limitations of tissue engineering; To understand the advances and challenges of stem cell applications; Enable students to access web-based resources in tissue engineering; Enable students to develop basic skills in tissue engineering research.
Note: Candidates enrolled in the Biomedical Stream in a combined degree with Bachelor of Science (Medical Science) are exempt from BMET2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers.
Stream Core option
BMET3990 Biomedical Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: MECH2901 or BMET2901 or [MEDS2005 and (MEDS2001 or PHSI2007)] Prohibitions: AMME4990 or BMET4990 or AMME9990 or BMET9990 Assumed knowledge: 1000-level chemistry, 2000-level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the 1000-level, and preferably at the 2000-level. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This UoS will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.
BMET5992 Regulatory Affairs in the Medical Industry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME4992 OR AMME5992 Assumed knowledge: MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 and 6cp of 1000-level Chemistry and 6cp of Biology units Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Supply of medical devices, diagnostics and related therapeutic products is regulated in most jurisdictions, with sophisticated and complex regulatory regimes in all large economies. These regulations are applied both to manufacturers and designers and to biomedical engineers undertaking device custom manufacture or maintenance in clinical environments. This UoS will explore the different regulatory frameworks in the 'Global Harmonisation Task Force' group of jurisdictions (US, EU, Canada, Japan, Australia), as well as emerging regulatory practices in Asia and South America. Emphasis will be on the commonality of the underlying technical standards and the importance of sophisticated risk management approaches to compliance.
Stream Elective units
BMET2400 Biomechanical Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH2400 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1801 and (AMME1802 or ENGG1802). HSC Maths and HSC Physics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ability to design within the context of biomedical engineering requires cross-disciplinary knowledge and an appreciation and application of professional engineering standards and ethics. This unit provides students the opportunity to experience the design process and to develop good engineering skills. Students will build on skills and knowledge developed in prerequisite units and be introduced to standards and creative tools relevant to biomedical applications. The importance of standard engineering drawings in the communication and definition of parts and assemblies, the use of a CAD package to create them, and the importance and deeper understanding of standard components will be integral to the learning in this unit. Students will also learn and use the design process from initial idea to finished product, and practice various methods used to generate creative solutions.
BMET2925 AI, Data, and Society in Health

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: BMET9925 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with general mathematical and statistical concepts. Online learning modules will be provided to support obtaining this knowledge. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Unprecedented growth in computing power, the advent of artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning technologies, and global data platforms are changing the way in which we approach real-world healthcare challenges. This interdisciplinary unit will introduce students from different backgrounds to the fundamental concepts of data analytics and AI, and their practical applications in healthcare. Throughout the unit, students will learn about the key concepts in data analytics and AI techniques, and obtain hands-on experience in applying these techniques to a broad range of healthcare problems. At the same time, they will develop an understanding of the ethical considerations in health data analytics and AI, and how their use impacts society: from the patient, to the doctor, to the broader community. A key element of the learning process will be a team-based Datathon project where students will deploy their knowledge to address an open-ended healthcare problem, in particular developing a practical solution and analysing how it's use may change things in the healthcare domain. Upon completion of this unit, students will understand and be able to enlist data analytics and AI tools to design solutions to healthcare problems.
BMET3802 Biomedical Instrumentation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: ELEC3802 or ELEC8882 or BMET9802 Assumed knowledge: A knowledge of basic anatomy and physiology and electrical circuits is required: Ohm's law, Thevenin's and Norton's theorems, basic circuit theory involving linear resistors, capacitors and inductors, operational amplifiers. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assumes a knowledge of basic principles in physics, mathematics, circuit theory and electronics. In particular, some understanding of the following is required: Thevenins and Nortons theorems, Fourier analysis, radiation, filtering, bipolar and field effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. The following topics are covered. Biology of the heart, circulatory and respiratory systems, physiology of nerve and muscle cells, fundamental organization of the brain and spinal cord. Medical instrumentation. ElectrocardioGram and automated diagnosis. Heart pacemakers and defibrillators. The bionic ear. Apparatus for treatment of sleep disordered breathing(sleep apnoea). Medical imaging and signal processing This unit is descriptive and does not require detailed knowledge of electronics or mathematics, but does require an understanding of some key aspects of mathematical and electronic theory. The unit concentrates on some of the practical applications of biomedical engineering to patient diagnosis and treatment.
BMET4981 Applied Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (ENGG1802 OR AMME1802) AND (MECH2400 OR BMET2400) Prohibitions: AMME4981 OR AMME9981 OR BMET9981 Assumed knowledge: MECH3361 AND (MECH2400 OR BMET2400) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901) AND MECH3362 AND (MECH3921 OR BMET3921) AND AMME2301 AND (AMME1362 OR AMME2302) AND AMME2500 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS will give students an understanding of CT/MRI based solid modelling, finite element methods, constitutive material models, design analysis and optimisation, experimental validation and their use in biomedical engineering. The students are expected to gain skills and experience with finite element software for the solution to sophisticated problems associated with biomedical engineering and experimentation techniques for the validation of these problems. The unit will take a holistic approach to the learning outcomes: an overview of typical biomedical design problems, an overview of finite element analysis software, a detailed look at finite element methods in biomedical applications, and a project-based learning approach to the development of a biomedical prosthesis. By the end of the unit, the students are expected to have familiarised themselves with design analysis, optimisation, and validation for biomedical engineering problems.
BMET5790 Introduction to Biomechatronics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prerequisites: (MECH3921 or BMET3921) or MTRX3700 or MTRX3760 or (AMME5921 or BMET5921 or BMET9921) Prohibitions: AMME4790 or AMME5790 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in mechanical and electronic engineering; adequate maths and applied maths skills; background knowledge of physics, chemistry and biology; Some programming capability: MATLAB, C, C++, software tools used by engineers including CAD and EDA packages. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomechatronics is the application of mechatronic engineering to human biology, and as such it forms an important subset of the overall biomedical engineering discipline. This unit focusses on a number of areas of interest including auditory and optical prostheses, artificial hearts and active and passive prosthetic limbs and examines the biomechatronic systems (hardware and signal processing) that underpin their operation.
BMET5907 Orthopaedic and Surgical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: MECH4902 OR MECH5907 Assumed knowledge: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901 OR AMME9901 OR BMET9901) AND (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921) Basic concepts in engineering mechanics - statics; dynamics; and solid mechanics. Basic concepts in materials science; specifically with regard to types of materials and the relation between properties and microstructure. A basic understanding of human biology and anatomy. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims and objectives of the UoS are: 1. To introduce the student to the details and practice of orthopaedic engineering; 2. To give students an overview of the diverse knowledge necessary for the design and evaluation of implants used in orthopaedic surgery; 3. To enable students to learn the language and concepts necessary for interaction with orthopaedic surgeons and the orthopaedic implant industry; 4. To introduce the student to the details and practice of other engineering applications in surgery, particularly in the cardiovascular realm.
BMET5911 Advanced Instrumentation for Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: Knowledge in calculus, linear differential equations, basic mechanics and electromagnetism. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers fundamental knowledge about the working principles of scanning probe microscopies, microsensors and other key instrumentation in nanotechnology with a focus on biophysical, biomedical and material science applications. Scanning probe microscopes work in a variety of environments ranging from vacuum to liquids, and are frequently used to study samples spanning from single atoms all the way up to live cells and tissues. Besides imaging, these technologies enable the manipulation of matter and the acquisition of many physical and chemical properties of samples up to the atomic scale. The knowledge provided in this UoS is intended to improve the competences of the students to understand, use and create technologies of great value in nanotechnology with applications across multiple disciplines.
BMET5931 Nanomaterials in Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5931 Assumed knowledge: [[(BIOL1xxx OR MBLG1xxx) AND CHEM1xxx AND PHYS1xxx] OR [(AMME1961 OR BMET1961)] AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901)]] AND (NANO2xxx OR AMME1362) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The application of science and technology at the nanoscale for biomedical problems promises to revolutionise medicine. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by applying nanotechnology to medicine. This course focuses on explaining the fundamentals of nanomedicine, and highlighting the special properties and application of nanomaterials in medicine. This course also reviews the most significant biomedical applications of nanomaterials including the recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, medical imaging, gene therapy, biosensors and cancer treatment.
BMET5933 Biomedical Image Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: An understanding of biology (1000-level), experience with programming (ENGG1801, ENGG1810, BMET2922 or BMET9922). Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomedical imaging technology is a fundamental element of both clinical practice and biomedical research, enabling the visualisation of biological characteristics and function often in a non-invasive fashion. The advancement of digital scanning technologies alongside the development of computational tools has driven significant progress in medical image analysis tools that support clinical decisions and the analysis of data from biological experiments. The focus of this unit will be the development of fundamental computational skills and knowledge in biomedical imaging, including data acquisition, formats, visualisation, segmentation, feature extraction, and machine learning based image analysis. On completion of this unit, students will be able to engineer and develop solutions for different biomedical imaging tasks encountered across a variety of use cases: clinical practice (e.g., computerised disease detection and diagnosis), research (e.g., cell video analysis), and industry (e.g., fabrication of customised implants from patient image data).
BMET5944 Bioinspired Materials: Design and Fabrication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000-level materials science and mechanics. Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
BMET5944 equips students with the state-of-the-art knowledge about the design and development of new generations of multifunctional materials by learning from nature. The unit covers: (a) the construction, deformation and failure behaviour of hard and soft natural materials which confer them with outstanding mechanical properties and multi-functionalities such as shape-morphing, self-healing and damage sensing, (b) the fabrication techniques to implement similar principles in engineering materials in order to improve their performance, (c) the theoretical and experimental approaches to study the mechanics of resulting materials, and (d) examples of bioinspired materials in industries, current challenges of the field and future perspectives.
BMET5953 Rehabilitation Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: 1000-level mathematics and 1000-level biology Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Rehabilitation Engineering is a staple course of biomedical engineering programs worldwide. This unit focuses on rehabilitation devices, external and internal, for communication and mobility. Rehabilitation engineering is the application of engineering analysis and design expertise to overcome disabilities and improve quality of life with assistive technologies. The unit will cover the inclusive design or 'design for all' process with consumer engagement, human-computer interfaces, mobility and communication needs. All students will design a project that addresses an unmet need. There will be visits to disability services organisations and learn about the National Disability Insurance Scheme. The unit will be taught through lectures and the design lab including computational and hands on design. Communication skills will be tested through a project 'pitch' presentation. Some teaching will be provided by rehabilitation engineers working in industry.
BMET5957 Bioelectronic Medicine Circuits and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Assumed knowledge: ELEC2104 and BMET2922 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is focused on the emergent and highly interdisciplinary field of electroceuticals as an alternative to pharmaceutical therapeutics. Biomedical devices, circuits and systems employ electrical, magnetic, optical, ultrasound, or other pulses to modulate peripheral nerves for target- and organ-specific effects. We want to understand: What is electroceutical therapy? How bioelectronic medicine could replace drugs? What are the benefits and side effects of electroceuticals in terms of safety, efficacy, and cost compared with pharmaceutical therapeutics?, and How a future bioelectrician works with clinician and conventional clinical practice? This unit aims to build complementary capabilities in design and simulation of circuits and systems for bioelectronic medicine interfaces. Students review, learn, design, simulate and implement test platforms for circuits and systems that enable bioelectronic treatments. Students will be equipped with knowledge on how to make more targeted and personalised treatments for neurological based diseases and conditions with a focus on closed-loop control systems. Students are expected to perform research on circuit implementation for different applications such as pain relief, bionic eye, pace makers. The unit also provides a deep overview on the roadmap of technologies and future trends in bioelectronic medicine and electroceuticals.
BMET5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5958 Assumed knowledge: (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR BMET9921) Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
BMET5962 Introduction to Mechanobiology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5962 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of 1000-level biology, 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry and 6 credit points of 2000-level physiology or equivalent Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mechanobiology has emerged as a new field of science that integrates biology and engineering and is now considered to have significant influence on the development of technologies for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. It is well known that tissues and cells are sensitive to their mechanical environment and changes to this environment can affect the physiological and pathophysiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms by which biological cells sense and respond to mechanical signals can lead to the development of novel treatments and therapies for a variety of diseases.
BMET5995 Advanced Bionics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Refer to the unit of study outline https://www.sydney.edu.au/units Prohibitions: AMME5995 OR AMME5951 OR BMET5951 Assumed knowledge: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 OR BMET3921 Assessment: Refer to the assessment table in the unit outline. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The field of 'bionics' is one of the primary embodiments of biomedical engineering. In the context of this unit, bionics is defined as a collection of therapeutic devices implanted into the body to restore or enhance functions lost through disease, developmental anomaly, or injury. Most typically, bionic devices intervene with the nervous system and aim to control neural activity through the delivery of electrical impulses. An example of this is a cochlear implant which delivers electrical impulses to physiologically excite surviving neurons of the auditory system, providing the capacity to elicit the psychological perception of sound. This unit primarily focuses upon the replacement of human senses, the nature and transduction of signals acquired, and how these ultimately effect neural activity.